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ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2012 | By Charlotte Stoudt
They're looking for a few good denouements. The Promenade Players Theater Company's “Six Characters Looking for an Author” and Katselas Theatre Company's solo show “I Am Chrissie” both spark from the same premise: Those who don't stage their history are condemned to repeat it. “Six Characters” is a new version of Luigi Pirandello's one-act by David Harrower. In this surreal skit, a tedious theater rehearsal takes an unexpected turn when an agitated family enters and announces its members are characters from an unfinished play.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2014 | By Margaret Gray
Among the revivals and West Coast premieres that dominate our theatrical offerings, the startling phrase “world premiere” implies an exhilarating, possibly risky novelty: You can't help expecting pyrotechnics. But Rachel Bonds' “Five Mile Lake,” receiving its world premiere at South Coast Repertory, is a small, quiet play in which nothing particularly momentous happens. In fact, you may forget you're watching a play at all, and that the people in whose every fleeting expression you have become so deeply absorbed are actors reciting memorized lines.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
At 80, South African playwright Athol Fugard is still turning out plays at a rate that would be daunting for a dramatist half his age. A crucial witness to the warping effect of apartheid on his country's soul, Fugard has continued in the post-apartheid era to track the difficult moral journey of characters heeding and resisting the national imperative of reconciliation. His latest play, "The Blue Iris," receiving its U.S. premiere at the Fountain Theatre, is in keeping with the distilled, backward-looking, frankly mournful style that has dominated his late works.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2012 | By Chris Willman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
You'd be hard-pressed to find a musical with less dramatic tension than "Million Dollar Quartet" anywhere this side of a "My Little Pony" touring show. The production that opened Tuesday at the Segerstrom Center for the Arts really just wants to let the good times roll, so you can be glad it devotes only about 10 minutes of its 105-minute running time to drumming up token conflicts between Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis, Carl Perkins and Johnny Cash and their visionary producer, Sam Phillips.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Just a few years after writing his antiwar masterpiece, "The Trojan Women," Euripides was even more despondent about the reckless imperialist course of Athenian foreign policy. His response wasn't a louder shriek of lament but a rollicking romantic melodrama - escapist fare, really, but with a radical Euripidean twist. Conceived of during a low point in the long and costly Peloponnesian War, "Helen," a sentimental adventure tale with a biting undercurrent of social criticism, dares to debunk the rationale for the Trojan War by imagining an alternative narrative about the faithless beauty who infamously launched a thousand Greek ships.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Before Quentin Tarantino, Martin McDonagh and all the other sadistic bad boys of film and theater, there was the 17th century dramatist John Ford testing his audience's tolerance for perverse blood sport. In his most popular play, " 'Tis Pity She's a Whore," now at Freud Playhouse through Saturday in an international touring production by the acclaimed London-based company Cheek by Jowl, Ford does his best to out-Jacobean the Jacobean playwrights he was weaned on. Revenge isn't just the main dish - it's the theme of his entire buffet.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Charles Smith is just your average, bumbling occupant of the Oval Office. Up for reelection, he doesn't stand much of a chance of gaining a second term. His wife is already asking whether she can take one of the White House couches she had reupholstered when they leave. Even those seeking favors are apt to remind him that his poll numbers are "lower than Gandhi's cholesterol. " From this desperate political situation, David Mamet, playwriting's graying enfant terrible, spins a retro farce that will have many wondering whether the ghost of Sid Caesar has taken possession of the author of such foul-mouthed dramatic landmarks as "American Buffalo" and "Glengarry Glen Ross.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Enigmatic anecdote is the currency of Martin Crimp's "The City," having its U.S. premiere at Son of Semele Theater in a production directed by artistic director Matthew McCray. The characters don't so much engage in dialogue as indulge in a cryptic form of storytelling, in which puzzling incidents are set against a background of warfare, brutality and personal desolation. A foreboding air of menace invokes the work of Harold Pinter, though Crimp, a playwright better known in the States for his springy translations of French dramatic classics, is more abstract and diffuse.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Six months after her husband's death, Olga Knipper, famed actress and widow of Anton Chekhov, is gearing up to face an audience again. In a dimly lighted rehearsal hall in St. Petersburg, Russia, with two other actors, she prepares to resume her life onstage. Her monologue from "The Cherry Orchard," though, is not coming out right. She fears that grief has destroyed her capacity to feel. Outside a graver crisis is erupting. A march of workers ended in a massacre. Actors from this company may have been killed.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
As imagined by John Logan in his Tony-winning drama "Red" and portrayed by the galvanizing Alfred Molina, painter Mark Rothko is a man of fierce convictions and fiery words. His opinions about art are delivered like biblical proclamations, spoken in the Old Testament cadences of a burning bush. As he holds forth on the nobility of highbrow ambition and the ignominy of commercial frivolity you might momentarily think you've stumbled into a town hall on the fate of the Museum of Contemporary Art. In fact, you are at the Mark Taper Forum, where this sensational production from London's Donmar Warehouse (and later Broadway)
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