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April 14, 2010 | By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
Helen Harris was sitting in a movie theater nearly two decades ago watching "Aladdin" when she felt someone start to kick her chair. Soon, tiny bits of popcorn were flying toward her, and then the sound of angry hissing from audience members asking her to leave the theater. She understood the patrons' frustration: For the better part of the film, Harris' son had been whispering in her ear, to explain what was going on on-screen. Harris, now 72, has retinitis pigmentosa, a degenerative and hereditary eye disease that she's lived with for most of her life.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2010 | By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
Helen Harris was sitting in a movie theater nearly two decades ago watching "Aladdin" when she felt someone start to kick her chair. Soon, tiny bits of popcorn were flying toward her, and then the sound of angry hissing from audience members asking her to leave the theater. She understood the patrons' frustration: For the better part of the film, Harris' son had been whispering in her ear, to explain what was going on on-screen. Harris, now 72, has retinitis pigmentosa, a degenerative and hereditary eye disease that she's lived with for most of her life.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1995 | MICHAEL ARKUSH
Thanks to Helen Harris, blind moviegoers may not stay in the dark much longer. Harris, head of Retinitis Pigmentosa International in Woodland Hills, has come up with the idea of TheatreVision, a process that allows the blind to receive film narration through a headset. The invention will officially debut tonight at a special showing of the smash movie "Forrest Gump" at Paramount Studios in Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1998 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Helen Harris is blind, but she still "sees" Christmas every year, from the strings of popcorn and brightly colored decorations on the tree to a roly-poly Santa with a long, white beard, soot-dusted red suit and shiny black boots. It's all due to Harris' own perseverance and the wide range of celebrities she's persuaded to lend their time, and their holiday memories, to a special television broadcast, "Eyes of Christmas."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1998 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Helen Harris is blind, but she still "sees" Christmas every year, from the strings of popcorn and brightly colored decorations on the tree to a roly-poly Santa with a long, white beard, soot-dusted red suit and shiny black boots. It's all due to Harris' own perseverance and the wide range of celebrities she's persuaded to lend their time, and their holiday memories, to a special television broadcast, "Eyes of Christmas."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1995 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Being blind accounts for Helen Harris' unusual vision for the movie industry. In her mind, she sees thousands of other sightless people sitting in theaters, enjoying the latest films by listening to a running account of the on-screen action through headphones. That explains why two stars from the 1948 movie classic "Little Women" were back on the old MGM lot in Culver City on Wednesday dubbing a new soundtrack for the 1994 remake of the Louisa May Alcott story.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 1995 | LEE MARGULIES, TIMES TELEVISION EDITOR
Call it an infomercial for the blind. A Woodland Hills-based nonprofit group called Retinitis Pigmentosa International has purchased time on KCOP-TV Channel 13 Sunday for a broadcast of the 1978 movie "Heaven Can Wait" with a special soundtrack that describes what's happening on screen for those who can't see.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2002 | Tracy L. Scott, Washington Post
This year, the Frank Capra Christmas classic "It's a Wonderful Life" features former President George H.W. Bush in a major role. He cannot be seen, but he can be heard by viewers whose televisions come equipped with the secondary audio program option. The new version of "It's a Wonderful Life," including Bush's narrative, first aired on Dec. 7 and will repeat Tuesday at 8 p.m. on NBC.
MAGAZINE
November 7, 1999 | Ed Leibowitz
While James Cameron's "Titanic" unspools on two monitors, actor Efrain Figueroa is laying down an audio play-by-play in Spanish, bringing the action into the realm of the blind. At this relatively calm moment in the film, Titanic survivor Gloria Stuart settles her 101-year-old eyes on Leonardo DiCaprio's nude portrait of Kate Winslet. "El retrato esta en solucion liquitada para no se desintegre," Figueroa intones (The drawing sits in clear liquid to keep it from drying out).
NEWS
April 17, 2010
High school basketball: In Thursday's Sports section, one of the photos accompanying an article about colleges' signing basketball recruits identified the player pictured as Ray McCallum, who had been pursued by UCLA. The photo was of Jared Sullinger, another top prospect. Deadmau5: An article in Friday's Calendar section about the electronic music act deadmau5 said that Joel Zimmerman, the man behind the act, was from Niagara Falls, N.Y. He is from Niagara Falls, Canada.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 1995 | LEE MARGULIES, TIMES TELEVISION EDITOR
Call it an infomercial for the blind. A Woodland Hills-based nonprofit group called Retinitis Pigmentosa International has purchased time on KCOP-TV Channel 13 Sunday for a broadcast of the 1978 movie "Heaven Can Wait" with a special soundtrack that describes what's happening on screen for those who can't see.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1995 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Being blind accounts for Helen Harris' unusual vision for the movie industry. In her mind, she sees thousands of other sightless people sitting in theaters, enjoying the latest films by listening to a running account of the on-screen action through headphones. That explains why two stars from the 1948 movie classic "Little Women" were back on the old MGM lot in Culver City on Wednesday dubbing a new soundtrack for the 1994 remake of the Louisa May Alcott story.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1995 | MICHAEL ARKUSH
Thanks to Helen Harris, blind moviegoers may not stay in the dark much longer. Harris, head of Retinitis Pigmentosa International in Woodland Hills, has come up with the idea of TheatreVision, a process that allows the blind to receive film narration through a headset. The invention will officially debut tonight at a special showing of the smash movie "Forrest Gump" at Paramount Studios in Hollywood.
NEWS
July 12, 1998 | HEATHER STEWART JORDEN
* Dustin Hoffman and Michael York were among the 200 guests who enjoyed "An Epicurean Evening" and raised $300,000 for UCLA's Jonsson Cancer Center on June 6. Held at UCLA's Franklin Murphy Sculpture Garden, the evening featured a four-course gourmet meal prepared by renowned chefs Roland Gibert of 72 Market St. and Gary Clauson, executive chef of the Hotel Bel-Air.
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