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Theodore B Olson

NEWS
February 12, 2001 | From the Washington Post
President Bush intends to appoint Larry D. Thompson, an Atlanta lawyer who is African American, to the high-profile post of deputy attorney general, a move designed in part to counter criticism that Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft is insensitive to race, administration sources said Sunday.
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NEWS
February 27, 1988 | Associated Press
Justice Anthony M. Kennedy will not take part in the Supreme Court's deliberations on the constitutionality of a federal law authorizing independent counsels to investigate alleged crimes by government officials, a spokeswoman said Friday. Court spokeswoman Toni House said Kennedy, who joined the court on Feb. 18, removed himself from consideration of the case without stating a reason. His absence creates the possibility of a 4-4 tie when the court's ruling, expected by July, is announced.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2014 | By Stephen Ceasar
Arguments begin Monday in a lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of laws that govern California's teacher tenure rules, seniority policies and the dismissal process -- an overhaul of which could upend controversial job security for instructors.  The lawsuit, filed by the nonprofit advocacy group Students Matter, contends these education laws are a violation of the Constitution's equal protection guarantee because they do not ensure all...
OPINION
January 27, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
State laws that make it nearly impossible to fire even the worst teachers make for poor educational policy. The same is true of laws that require teacher layoffs to be decided on the basis of seniority, and that give principals only a year and a half to decide whether a new teacher deserves the extraordinary protections of tenure. It seems pretty obvious: Incompetent or uncaring teachers shouldn't be allowed to keep their jobs. On Monday, a trial will begin in a lawsuit that claims California's teacher protection laws unconstitutionally deprive students of equal access to a quality education.
NATIONAL
March 27, 2013 | By David Horsey
This week, the United States Supreme Court is delving into arguments about same-sex marriage and doing so with apparent reluctance and unease. Today, the justices will consider the federal Defense of Marriage Act that denies federal benefits to same-sex married couples. On Tuesday, the issue before them was California's Proposition 8, the voter-approved initiative that placed a same-sex marriage ban in the state constitution in 2008. A U.S. District Court judge subsequently declared the ban unconstitutional, and in 2012 the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals upheld that ruling.
OPINION
February 14, 1999
Re "Leading the President Astray," Commentary, Jan. 25: The rantings of Harvard law professor Alan Dershowitz against Robert Bennett, President Clinton's lawyer in the Paula Jones case, would be laughable if they were not so irresponsible. Dershowitz does not know what advice Bennett gave to his client, the extent to which the president may have lied to his lawyer (beyond the lying to Bennett that the president has already acknowledged), or what tactical decisions in the Jones case were made, not by Bennett, but by the president or others on the ample White House legal team.
OPINION
March 25, 2009
When is a movie not just a movie? According to the Federal Election Commission, when the film's villain isn't a terrorist or a drug dealer but a candidate for president. The agency decided that the producers of a 90-minute documentary critical of Hillary Rodham Clinton -- which they hoped to offer "on demand" to interested cable TV viewers -- had to abide by rules governing "electioneering communications," including a prohibition on advertising close to a primary or general election.
OPINION
March 26, 2009
In 2006, during hearings on President Bush's nomination of Samuel A. Alito Jr. to the Supreme Court, Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) reminded Democrats inclined to oppose Alito that "elections matter." Apparently Graham's wisdom was lost on 31 of his fellow Republicans who voted against President Obama's nomination of Elena Kagan, dean of Harvard Law School, to serve as U.S. solicitor general, the government's chief courtroom advocate. (Graham himself didn't vote.
NATIONAL
September 12, 2001 | By Matea Gold and Maggie Farley, Los Angeles Times Staff Writers
In the worst terrorist attack ever against the United States, hijackers struck at the preeminent symbols of the nation's wealth and might Tuesday, flying airliners into the World Trade Center and the Pentagon and killing or injuring thousands of people. As a horrified nation watched on television, the twin towers of the World Trade Center in lower Manhattan collapsed into flaming rubble after two Boeing 767s rammed their upper stories. A third airliner, a Boeing 757, flattened one of the Pentagon's five sides.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2001
During the first six months of his presidency, George W. Bush sided consistently with conservatives on issues ranging from the environment to missile defenses. But as President Bush aims to get back to the "compassionate" conservatism that he campaigned on, he is signaling compromise. The first was his decision on the funding of stem cell research.
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