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Theodore B Olson

NATIONAL
May 28, 2003 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
In a victory for the Bush administration, the Supreme Court on Tuesday rejected a challenge to the use of secret deportation hearings authorized after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Without comment, the justices turned away an appeal brought by news organizations in New Jersey. So far, the high court has shown no interest in taking up legal claims that have arisen recently in the war on terrorism.
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NATIONAL
November 14, 2003 | From Reuters
A federal judge Thursday rejected a request by Jonathan Pollard, a civilian U.S. naval intelligence officer who admitted spying for Israel, to reopen his case and reconsider his 1987 sentence of life in prison. U.S. District Chief Judge Thomas Hogan said a different judge had been correct in 2001 in turning down Pollard's request for resentencing. Pollard, 49, is serving the life sentence at a federal prison in North Carolina.
NATIONAL
November 14, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The Supreme Court on Monday let stand the murder conviction of Kennedy cousin Michael Skakel, who is serving a prison term of at least 20 years. The justices declined, without comment, to take Skakel's appeal of his conviction in the beating death of his Greenwich, Conn., neighbor, Martha Moxley, 31 years ago when the two were teenagers. Skakel, a nephew of Ethel Kennedy, was convicted in 2002. Skakel, 46, is serving 20 years to life in prison. His lawyer, former Solicitor General Theodore B.
OPINION
March 25, 2009
When is a movie not just a movie? According to the Federal Election Commission, when the film's villain isn't a terrorist or a drug dealer but a candidate for president. The agency decided that the producers of a 90-minute documentary critical of Hillary Rodham Clinton -- which they hoped to offer "on demand" to interested cable TV viewers -- had to abide by rules governing "electioneering communications," including a prohibition on advertising close to a primary or general election.
OPINION
February 14, 1999
Re "Leading the President Astray," Commentary, Jan. 25: The rantings of Harvard law professor Alan Dershowitz against Robert Bennett, President Clinton's lawyer in the Paula Jones case, would be laughable if they were not so irresponsible. Dershowitz does not know what advice Bennett gave to his client, the extent to which the president may have lied to his lawyer (beyond the lying to Bennett that the president has already acknowledged), or what tactical decisions in the Jones case were made, not by Bennett, but by the president or others on the ample White House legal team.
NATIONAL
April 28, 2004 | From Associated Press
Excerpts from Tuesday's Supreme Court oral arguments, as transcribed by Alderson Reporting Co.: Solicitor Gen. Theodore B. Olson: This is a case about the separation of powers. The Constitution explicitly commits to the president's discretion the authority to obtain the opinions of subordinates and to formulate recommendations for legislation. Congress may neither intrude on the president's ability to perform these functions nor authorize private litigants to use the courts to do so....
BUSINESS
June 24, 2007 | Abigail Goldman, Times Staff Writer
In 2004, Wal-Mart Stores Inc. was looking to hire an expert to handle an appeal, not to build a long-term relationship with another big-city attorney. The world's largest retailer had plenty of those, paying 250 law firms around the country about $200 million a year to represent its interests. Then the legal team at Wal-Mart met mild-mannered Theodore J. Boutrous Jr., a Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher partner. Now, he represents the company on a variety of matters around the U.S.
NATIONAL
June 17, 2003 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
Corporations, even small ones that earn no profits and use their money to promote causes, can be barred from directly funding federal campaigns, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday. The 7-2 decision strongly reaffirms the view that the government can bar the flow of corporate money to politicians and their campaigns. Some legal experts viewed the ruling as good news for defenders of the broad campaign finance law that will be challenged in the high court in September.
BUSINESS
June 27, 2001 | PETER KAPLAN, REUTERS
The U.S. government will appeal a judge's dismissal of a landmark suit charging AMR Corp.'s American Airlines with using predatory tactics to drive low-cost carriers from its hub at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport, the Justice Department said Tuesday. The case has been closely watched because it could settle some long-disputed questions about what constitutes fair competition in the airline industry. The government filed notice of the pending appeal with the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2000
Underlying all the U.S. Supreme Court debate Monday over equal-protection guarantees, the intent of the voter and the appropriate reach of the Florida Supreme Court was a single question, the most basic one the court has faced in this matter: Does every vote count? In a second round of solemn yet spirited argument, a majority of the justices appeared not to have moved from the presumption they seemingly held in stopping the recount Saturday--that George W.
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