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Theodore B Olson

NATIONAL
December 6, 2006 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
A presidential advisory commission created two years ago to monitor the effects of anti-terrorism measures on civil liberties held its first public hearing Tuesday amid criticism from advocacy groups that the panel was a paper tiger and indications that its members were wrestling with their watchdog role. The four-member Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board was urged to take a more aggressive tack in checking the power of the Bush administration in its handling of the war on terrorism.
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OPINION
December 3, 2000
Court wrestles with complex issues. "May it please the court," intoned each lawyer as he began his argument before the U.S. Supreme Court at Friday's extraordinary recorded session. Though questions from the nine justices raised doubt about how they would rule on the constitutional challenge to Florida's Supreme Court decision regarding ballot recounts, there can be no doubt about the value of listening to the hearing, as Americans were finally permitted to do.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2003 | Cara Mia DiMassa, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. Department of Justice has urged the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn regulations established by Southern California's smog-fighting agency to curb pollution from taxis, buses, trash trucks and other fleet vehicles. The government contended in a friend of the court brief filed Friday that the rules are at odds with the federal Clean Air Act because the authority to make such rules is limited to the federal government.
NEWS
December 24, 1993 | RONALD J. OSTROW and DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The campaign to win release for convicted spy Jonathan Pollard hit a snag Thursday with the disclosure of a note Pollard wrote that appears to express justification for his actions in selling classified information to Israel. The handwritten note was dated last June and disclosed Thursday by Jewish Week, a New York-based newspaper. In it, Pollard praised an article emphasizing the moral rightness of his action and comparing him to Moses.
NEWS
March 30, 1989 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
As Oliver L. North's lawyers prepared to put their case before the jury in his Iran-Contra trial, Ronald Reagan Wednesday objected to appearing for the defense. Reagan's attorney, Theodore B. Olson, filed papers with the court saying that the former President is not convinced that his testimony is necessary to North's case.
NEWS
October 26, 1989 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Justice Department raised the possibility Wednesday that it might challenge a federal judge's ruling that former President Ronald Reagan's notes and diaries on Iran-Contra events can be subpoenaed for the trial of his former national security adviser, John M. Poindexter. Department lawyers are reviewing the 67-page ruling of U.S. District Judge Harold Greene, said David Runkel, the department's chief spokesman.
NEWS
December 3, 1986 | RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writer
In asking a special three-judge panel to name an independent counsel, Atty. Gen. Edwin Meese III will be acting under a law that is designed to avoid conflict of interest in the investigation of high-ranking Administration officials who are suspected of violating federal criminal law. The law setting up the apparatus for an independent counsel, formerly known as a special prosecutor, is the Ethics in Government Act of 1978, which grew out of the Watergate scandal.
NEWS
November 17, 1989 | RONALD J. OSTROW and ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A federal judge ruled Thursday that former President Ronald Reagan must turn over by next Wednesday the diaries and other personal records that John M. Poindexter, his former national security adviser, says he needs to defend himself against Iran-Contra charges. In issuing the order, which sets the stage for a constitutional battle over executive privilege, U.S. District Judge Harold H.
NEWS
November 29, 2001 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The era of the unregulated Internet may be nearing an end. Congress wants to make it a crime to put sexually explicit material on the Web if it can be obtained freely by children and teenagers. Until now, the courts have blocked all the moves to regulate free speech on the Internet, but the Supreme Court justices strongly suggested during arguments Wednesday that they will revive a new law that targets commercial pornographers.
NEWS
January 24, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration argued Tuesday that former President Ronald Reagan should be permitted to testify on videotape if he must give evidence in the Iran-Contra trial of former National Security Adviser John M. Poindexter.
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