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HOME & GARDEN
March 30, 2006 | Emily Green, Times Staff Writer
FOR most of the 46 years that the Theodore Payne Foundation has worked to educate Angelenos about the splendor of native flora, the group has been largely dismissed as weed huggers. Payne was an obscure English seedsman who championed wildflowers. The California dream was supposed to be about roses in January, not sagebrush. Yet three years ago, the foundation finally discovered its secret weapon: beauty. It would let the plants do the talking. It would stage a garden tour.
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NEWS
April 4, 2013
If the phrase “native plants” conjures the image of a scrubby yard that looks more like wild parkland than lovingly tended landscape, then Lynnette Kampe asks for a little open-mindedness. “You can't typecast these gardens,” said Kampe, executive director of the Theodore Payne Foundation for Wildflowers and Native Plants, which holds its annual garden tour this weekend. The 42 featured properties include romantic cottage gardens, native gardens with clean lines and a modern aesthetic, and some pretty substitutes for traditional lawns, she said.
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HOME & GARDEN
March 30, 2006 | Emily Green, Times Staff Writer
LIKE so many Californians, the man who would become synonymous with the campaign to save our fluttering wildflowers wasn't born here. Rather, Theodore Payne was born in Northamptonshire, a no-nonsense belt of middle England. Orphaned in childhood, he emigrated from Britain as a young nurseryman in 1893. By his death in 1963 at the age of 91, he was not just a paid-up Californian, but also one of that distinctly independent subset: a Southern Californian.
OPINION
December 11, 2010 | Patt Morrison
Once upon a time, California wholesaled its fabulous flora. The searing brilliance of poppies and lupines and the pale greens of grasses spread themselves like titanic picnic cloths over a seemingly endless landscape. Now, of course, much of this vast plant menagerie has been plowed or paved or plucked away to the margins, even toward extinction. Horticulturist Theodore Payne saw this unhappy prospect when he came here more than a century ago from England as a teenager; in his 70 years in Southern California, he crafted native plant legacies in gardens from Santa Ana, Exposition Park and Caltech to Descanso Gardens.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1996
This 23-acre native plant nursery and education facility is blooming with more than 400 varieties of wildflowers and plants. It is also a bird sanctuary, home to many red-tailed hawks, majestic golden eagles and owls.
NEWS
April 4, 2013
If the phrase “native plants” conjures the image of a scrubby yard that looks more like wild parkland than lovingly tended landscape, then Lynnette Kampe asks for a little open-mindedness. “You can't typecast these gardens,” said Kampe, executive director of the Theodore Payne Foundation for Wildflowers and Native Plants, which holds its annual garden tour this weekend. The 42 featured properties include romantic cottage gardens, native gardens with clean lines and a modern aesthetic, and some pretty substitutes for traditional lawns, she said.
HOME & GARDEN
December 16, 2004 | Lili Singer
Few men have done more for the California landscape than a Brit named Theodore Payne. He arrived here as a young man in 1893, fell hard for his new homeland and devoted his life to the preservation and distribution of its plants and flowers. In the early 1960s, he penned his memories, which are gathered in this charming collection, printed for the Theodore Payne Foundation in Sun Valley. "Life on the Modjeska Ranch in the Gay Nineties," recounts his first U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2002 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This time of year, when many Southern Californians come to realize their near-perfect climate is actually challenging for backyard gardeners, they often turn to the Theodore Payne Foundation in Sun Valley, which is dedicated to the propagation of native species. At the foundation Wednesday, Sharon Emanuelli lifted pots of young plants from a red wagon and into the back of her car.
OPINION
December 11, 2010 | Patt Morrison
Once upon a time, California wholesaled its fabulous flora. The searing brilliance of poppies and lupines and the pale greens of grasses spread themselves like titanic picnic cloths over a seemingly endless landscape. Now, of course, much of this vast plant menagerie has been plowed or paved or plucked away to the margins, even toward extinction. Horticulturist Theodore Payne saw this unhappy prospect when he came here more than a century ago from England as a teenager; in his 70 years in Southern California, he crafted native plant legacies in gardens from Santa Ana, Exposition Park and Caltech to Descanso Gardens.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2002 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Time is running out for the Theodore Payne Foundation. For almost 30 years, the nonprofit organization has sold wildflowers and other native plants out of a modest wooden building in Sun Valley. But the zoning variance that allows it to operate its current office expires Sept. 14. Unless a new variance is approved by the city of Los Angeles, the foundation will have to find another home from which to preach the virtues of native plants.
HOME & GARDEN
March 30, 2006 | Emily Green, Times Staff Writer
LIKE so many Californians, the man who would become synonymous with the campaign to save our fluttering wildflowers wasn't born here. Rather, Theodore Payne was born in Northamptonshire, a no-nonsense belt of middle England. Orphaned in childhood, he emigrated from Britain as a young nurseryman in 1893. By his death in 1963 at the age of 91, he was not just a paid-up Californian, but also one of that distinctly independent subset: a Southern Californian.
HOME & GARDEN
March 30, 2006 | Emily Green, Times Staff Writer
FOR most of the 46 years that the Theodore Payne Foundation has worked to educate Angelenos about the splendor of native flora, the group has been largely dismissed as weed huggers. Payne was an obscure English seedsman who championed wildflowers. The California dream was supposed to be about roses in January, not sagebrush. Yet three years ago, the foundation finally discovered its secret weapon: beauty. It would let the plants do the talking. It would stage a garden tour.
HOME & GARDEN
December 16, 2004 | Lili Singer
Few men have done more for the California landscape than a Brit named Theodore Payne. He arrived here as a young man in 1893, fell hard for his new homeland and devoted his life to the preservation and distribution of its plants and flowers. In the early 1960s, he penned his memories, which are gathered in this charming collection, printed for the Theodore Payne Foundation in Sun Valley. "Life on the Modjeska Ranch in the Gay Nineties," recounts his first U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2002 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Time is running out for the Theodore Payne Foundation. For almost 30 years, the nonprofit organization has sold wildflowers and other native plants out of a modest wooden building in Sun Valley. But the zoning variance that allows it to operate its current office expires Sept. 14. Unless a new variance is approved by the city of Los Angeles, the foundation will have to find another home from which to preach the virtues of native plants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2002 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This time of year, when many Southern Californians come to realize their near-perfect climate is actually challenging for backyard gardeners, they often turn to the Theodore Payne Foundation in Sun Valley, which is dedicated to the propagation of native species. At the foundation Wednesday, Sharon Emanuelli lifted pots of young plants from a red wagon and into the back of her car.
MAGAZINE
July 30, 2000 | MARY MELTON
Named for a British horticulturist who fell in love with the native flora when he moved here in 1893, the Theodore Payne Foundation sells more than 300 indigenous California plants and seeds on its 22 acres. We looked into the rolling wagons of a few shoppers during a Saturday morning sale at the nonprofit retail nursery to see what makes their gardens grow.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1998 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Talk about timing. When the folks at the Theodore Payne Foundation picked Feb. 6 to launch their annual winter sale of drought-resistant plants, how could they have known that one of the season's meanest El Nino storms would strike the very same day? "It's windy, it's cold and it's wet," said Michael Kristiansen, the foundation's executive director. "Nobody's going to come out on a day like this." Kristiansen was close but not totally accurate in his prediction Friday morning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1998 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Talk about timing. When the folks at the Theodore Payne Foundation picked Feb. 6 to launch their annual winter sale of drought-resistant plants, how could they have known that one of the season's meanest El Nino storms would strike the very same day? "It's windy, it's cold and it's wet," said Michael Kristiansen, the foundation's executive director. "Nobody's going to come out on a day like this." Kristiansen was close but not totally accurate in his prediction Friday morning.
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