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Theodore Roosevelt National Park

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NATIONAL
November 2, 2013 | By Becca Clemons
WASHINGTON - On a stretch of ranchland nestled in the North Dakota Badlands, under dark, star-filled night skies, serene landscape and solitude, Theodore Roosevelt formed his strong conservationist ideals more than a century ago. But the night skies around the former president's Elkhorn Ranch, referred to as the "cradle of conservation" by environmentalists and historians, now glow orange. From some of the highest points in what is now Theodore Roosevelt National Park, dozens of natural gas flares are visible not far away.
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NATIONAL
November 2, 2013 | By Becca Clemons
WASHINGTON - On a stretch of ranchland nestled in the North Dakota Badlands, under dark, star-filled night skies, serene landscape and solitude, Theodore Roosevelt formed his strong conservationist ideals more than a century ago. But the night skies around the former president's Elkhorn Ranch, referred to as the "cradle of conservation" by environmentalists and historians, now glow orange. From some of the highest points in what is now Theodore Roosevelt National Park, dozens of natural gas flares are visible not far away.
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TRAVEL
August 31, 2003
I was thrilled to see the article on Theodore Roosevelt National Park in North Dakota ["Roosevelt's Home on the Range," July 20]. I am a native of North Dakota, and my heart will always be there. It was great to see the state reflected in a positive light instead of as some place almost off the planet. The colors in the Grand Canyon may be beautiful, but the colors in Theodore Roosevelt Park are beyond description. The article did not mention that the Maah Daah Hey Trail now connects both units of the park [through Little Missouri National Grassland]
NATIONAL
February 14, 2004 | Elizabeth Shogren, Times Staff Writer
In a decision that raises the possibility of increased pollution in national parks around the country, the Bush administration will allow North Dakota to change the way it estimates air pollution over Theodore Roosevelt National Park. The change, announced Friday in Bismarck, N.D., means that a consortium of power companies will be able to go ahead with a coal-fired power plant in North Dakota, and other power plants could open in the future, state officials said.
TRAVEL
July 20, 2003 | Joe McElwee, Special to The Times
The Sioux call this bleak terrain mako shika, "land of no good." When Gen. Alfred Sully led an expedition through North Dakota's badlands in the 1860s, he dubbed the place "hell with the fires out." But in 1883, when a 24-year-old New Yorker named Teddy Roosevelt arrived on this frontier for the first time, he called the experience "the romance of my life." On a family vacation two years ago, I began to understand why.
NATIONAL
February 14, 2004 | Elizabeth Shogren, Times Staff Writer
In a decision that raises the possibility of increased pollution in national parks around the country, the Bush administration will allow North Dakota to change the way it estimates air pollution over Theodore Roosevelt National Park. The change, announced Friday in Bismarck, N.D., means that a consortium of power companies will be able to go ahead with a coal-fired power plant in North Dakota, and other power plants could open in the future, state officials said.
TRAVEL
July 7, 1996 | KEVIN BREEN, Breen is a freelance writer from Grand Rapids, Mich
Tucked away at the western edge of North Dakota, among endless prairies and grasslands and far from any large cities, Theodore Roosevelt National Park is among the least visited of all our national parks--a fate that is ill-deserved because a trip here promises open land, abundant wildlife and very few people. But those weren't the only features I found attractive. I was also interested in how the land had shaped the political life of Theodore Roosevelt, particularly his conservation policies.
NEWS
October 1, 2012 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
More than a century ago, Teddy Roosevelt went on a really big camping trip that forever changed America. In 1903 he visited Yellowstone National Park , the Grand Canyon and slept under the stars in Yosemite with John Muir, who pressed him to preserve the land of big granite walls as a national park. By the time he left office, Roosevelt had created five national parks, 18 national monuments, 51 federal bird sanctuaries and added millions of acres to the national forests.
NEWS
August 22, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
President Wilson on Aug. 25, 1916, created a National Park Service that would "... conserve the scenery and the natural and historic objects and wild life therein, and to provide for the enjoyment of the same in such manner and by such means as will leave them unimpaired for future generations. " Ninety-seven years later, the system has grown to oversee more than 84 million acres of public lands. To mark Founders Day on Sunday, parks across the nation will waive entrance fees. The deal: In addition to free entrance, many parks have special free events planned too. --At Theodore Roosevelt National Park , the "president" will show up between 11 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. local time at the South Unit Visitor Center in Medora, N.D. -- Arches National Park near Moab, Utah, will host events on culture and natural diversity all day at the park's visitor center.
NEWS
October 26, 2003 | Curt Woodward, Associated Press Writer
Is North Dakota's air clean enough? The answer depends who you ask. Ron Patch, who monitors air quality for the state from stations like this one at the edge of Painted Canyon in Theodore Roosevelt National Park, says the sulfur dioxide readings he gets are "always pretty much zero." The only surprises he encounters on the badlands of Theodore Roosevelt National Park are the occasional bison wandering by.
TRAVEL
August 31, 2003
I was thrilled to see the article on Theodore Roosevelt National Park in North Dakota ["Roosevelt's Home on the Range," July 20]. I am a native of North Dakota, and my heart will always be there. It was great to see the state reflected in a positive light instead of as some place almost off the planet. The colors in the Grand Canyon may be beautiful, but the colors in Theodore Roosevelt Park are beyond description. The article did not mention that the Maah Daah Hey Trail now connects both units of the park [through Little Missouri National Grassland]
TRAVEL
July 20, 2003 | Joe McElwee, Special to The Times
The Sioux call this bleak terrain mako shika, "land of no good." When Gen. Alfred Sully led an expedition through North Dakota's badlands in the 1860s, he dubbed the place "hell with the fires out." But in 1883, when a 24-year-old New Yorker named Teddy Roosevelt arrived on this frontier for the first time, he called the experience "the romance of my life." On a family vacation two years ago, I began to understand why.
TRAVEL
July 7, 1996 | KEVIN BREEN, Breen is a freelance writer from Grand Rapids, Mich
Tucked away at the western edge of North Dakota, among endless prairies and grasslands and far from any large cities, Theodore Roosevelt National Park is among the least visited of all our national parks--a fate that is ill-deserved because a trip here promises open land, abundant wildlife and very few people. But those weren't the only features I found attractive. I was also interested in how the land had shaped the political life of Theodore Roosevelt, particularly his conservation policies.
NEWS
April 7, 1991 | MARILYNN WHEELER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Little Missouri National Grasslands, in the rugged Dakota territory where Theodore Roosevelt rode the range, could become the next frontier of oil development. Two-thirds of the 20 million barrels of oil pumped on U.S. Forest Service lands in the last fiscal year came from 522 wells on the grasslands, said Louise Odegaard, the agency's spokeswoman in Bismarck.
NEWS
September 22, 1991 | MARILYNN WHEELER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Dozens of wild horses that some assert are descended from Sitting Bull's war ponies are to be captured this fall at Theodore Roosevelt National Park in western North Dakota. Chief ranger Bob Powell says the wild horse population is nearing 120, and he hopes that the Oct. 1 roundup will reduce the herd by at least 75 animals. "If we didn't remove some of the horses, they would start to compete with the park's bison, elk and bighorn sheep," Powell said.
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