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NEWS
October 4, 1992 | BRAD BONHALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was 9:15 on the night of May 27, and Cara Vanni was chatting with a friend on the phone, just like any number of San Clemente teen-agers. Suddenly the line went dead. A minute later, strangers appeared in her bedroom doorway. "My parents brought these three people into my room," Cara, 16, recalled. "At first I thought they were old friends of the family who were about to say they knew me when I was 4. They weren't."
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OPINION
March 27, 2014
Re “Finding healing in music,” Column, March 22 Music as a tool to help children cope with feelings of grief and pain has been shown to be an effective intervention; in fact, even lighthearted group drumming sessions can be of positive benefit. Incorporating sensory integrative activities, such as music, help break down barriers posed by the feelings of fear, frustration, desperation and helplessness that children face when dealing with the loss of a loved one. I underscore Arvis Jones' music therapy methodology as part of a psychosocial grief management recovery process for traumatized children.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2000 | KENDALL S. POWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Have you ever tried to read a newspaper with one hand?" asked Leslie McClellan. The 68-year-old man from Gainesville, Fla., knows that it's truly an exercise in frustration. Reading a newspaper is just one of life's daily activities that is a challenge for the two-thirds of the 4 million American stroke survivors who are left physically impaired. (Former President Gerald R. Ford suffered what was called a small stroke Wednesday, but doctors said he does not seem to be significantly impaired).
BUSINESS
March 9, 2014 | By Chad Terhune and Eryn Brown
A pair of new drugs to treat hepatitis C offer a cure for millions of Americans afflicted with the disease - but at a potentially staggering cost to taxpayers and health plans. Until now, therapies for hepatitis C helped only about half of patients and posed numerous side effects, such as flu-like symptoms, anemia or depression. In comparison, clinical trials of Sovaldi and Olysio have shown cure rates of 80% to 90% with far fewer complications. That progress, though, comes at a price.
HEALTH
August 2, 2010 | By Jessie Schiewe, Los Angeles Times
It's 1 o'clock on a Tuesday afternoon, and Heidi Kling is reading in an all-white room. She's shoeless, but socks protect her feet from the 6 inches of salt that cake the floor. The only objects in the windowless room are four chaise longues and hand-molded plaster icicles that hang from the ceiling. If there were a Yeti in the room, you would swear you were on the Matterhorn at Disneyland. Normally, Kling would be at work or running errands, but today her allergies, which cause her ears to ring, have brought her to this monochrome sanctuary.
OPINION
March 27, 2014
Re “Finding healing in music,” Column, March 22 Music as a tool to help children cope with feelings of grief and pain has been shown to be an effective intervention; in fact, even lighthearted group drumming sessions can be of positive benefit. Incorporating sensory integrative activities, such as music, help break down barriers posed by the feelings of fear, frustration, desperation and helplessness that children face when dealing with the loss of a loved one. I underscore Arvis Jones' music therapy methodology as part of a psychosocial grief management recovery process for traumatized children.
OPINION
September 4, 2012
Re "Therapy that isn't," Opinion, Aug. 27 Let me add my voice in support of Lara Embry, a psychologist who rightly excoriates "conversion therapy" to change someone's sexual orientation. Such conversion therapies are harmful and without credibility or professional support, and we shouldn't be surprised that our society would take measures to make them illegal. The belief of the immorality of gay or lesbian behavior is purely religious. Until my retirement, I professionally engaged in supervising psychotherapists as a licensed clinical social worker and as a psychologist.
NEWS
May 17, 2012
Gay conversion "therapy" is ineffective and harmful, The Times acknowledges in a May 11 editorial . Still, the editorial board opposes a bill in the state Senate to protect Californians from this dangerous practice. I was a gay teenager in a deeply fundamentalist Christian household, desperate to escape what I was taught was the shame and sin of my sexual orientation. A psychotherapist promised me and my parents that he could make me straight if I tried hard enough. I latched onto that hope, envisioning a new life in which I could be saved by God and accepted by my family.  But that hope turned to despair -- deep despair that lasted for years -- when I realized I could not change who I was.  My experience deepened my depression, shame and feelings of isolation, rejection and failure.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2012 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
There is a great deal of music in the world, and no one knows exactly why. But it does have its ready uses. The music business can make you rich and famous. The pianist Christopher O'Riley admitted in The Times last week what a lot of classical musicians won't: He learned the piano, at least in part, to attract the attention of girls. As I write this, a sparkling new recording of Tod Machover's "Sparkler," an infectious overture for orchestra and live electronics, is playing on my stereo and making itself useful.
SCIENCE
July 11, 2013 | By Melissa Pandika
Italian researchers have used a defanged version of HIV to replace faulty genes - and eliminate devastating symptoms - in children suffering two rare and fatal genetic diseases. Improved gene therapy techniques prevented the onset of metachromatic leukodystrophy in three young children and halted the progression of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome in three others. The advance represents a major stride for a field that has struggled to translate experimental successes in lab animals into safe and effective treatments for people, experts said.
OPINION
March 5, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Clostridium difficile is a dangerous infection that, as its name implies, is not always easy to treat successfully with antibiotics. In many cases, the infection is actually triggered by antibiotic use during hospitalization; the medications kill beneficial bacteria that keep C. difficile in check. Now, some doctors are treating the infection with a procedure called fecal transplant, an unappealing but extremely effective approach that involves transferring filtered stool from a healthy donor to a patient afflicted with the disease, to reintroduce the helpful gut bacteria.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2014
On The Takeaway video wrapup, The Times' Ann Simmons and columnist Robin Abcarian chat about former KCBS-TV news anchor Bree Walker, reparative therapy, and the always entertaining Rob Ford, Toronto's crack-smoking mayor who is the subject of a new biography. Walker, who has been out of the public eye for many years, was suddenly thrust back into the headlines when Anaheim police pulled her over early Wednesday on suspicion of driving while under the influence of alcohol. Her unflattering booking mug shot was picked up by Internet news and gossip sites, and became an instant object of ridicule.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2014 | By Robin Abcarian
There may have been a time when the impulse to “cure” people of their homosexuality through psychological or spiritual intervention was accepted as an ethical course of action. Those days are long gone. And yet even today, despite all the evidence that it's harmful, the practice, known as “reparative therapy,” “conversion therapy” or “sex orientation change efforts,” continues to mess with the sanity of youngsters coming to grips with who they are. “Ten or 15 years ago, our main challenge was getting people to believe that this was harmful to people,” said Samantha Ames, a staff attorney at the National Center for Lesbian Rights, part of a coalition of civil rights groups like Equality California and mental health organizations, toiling to outlaw reparative therapy for minors state by state.
NEWS
February 25, 2014 | By Jay Jones
A Chinese master of medicine-free healing is prompting interest in Kokolulu Farm, a retreat center on the Big Island of Hawaii. Ning Jian Xiong arrived in early February and will be in residency at Kokolulu , near the village of Hawi, through July. Since arriving in early February, Ning's weekend retreats have been sellouts as people seek his knowledge in Zhineng Qigong, a 6,000-year-old Chinese therapy in which healing focuses on exercise, love and energy. “Energy has been the foundation of our program from the very beginning,” said Lew Whitney, the retreat's co-founder.
WORLD
February 21, 2014 | By Kate Linthicum
TEL AVIV - Before the Israeli rock band 9 Lives takes the stage, its members gather for a rowdy group hug. They slap one another on the back, jump a few times in unison and gulp shots of arak, a popular anise-infused spirit. The nine musicians have overcome crippling injuries and post-traumatic stress to arrive together at a popular Tel Aviv nightclub, where on this night they share billing with Israeli rock legend Ehud Banai. "This band keeps me alive," said 9 Lives vocalist Dekel Darchani, 37, who wears his black hair in a rockabilly pompadour.
HEALTH
February 14, 2014 | By Melinda Fulmer
Lower-back pain is one of the most common adult complaints. Here's a way to roll away some of the tension in this area. Fitness instructor Jill Miller uses yoga therapy balls (or tennis balls) to massage away the tension in this low-back lengthener. What it does The yoga therapy balls grip the skin as they roll, digging and loosening up the thoracolumbar fascia, the connective tissue that covers the muscles of the back of the trunk. What to do Lie on the floor and prop yourself up on your elbows.
OPINION
December 29, 2010
The picture says it all. Taken by Times photographer Rick Loomis, it neatly sums up the dysfunction of California's prison system. In the photograph, two mentally ill inmates in the Vacaville prison sit in metal cages the size of phone booths for what is supposed to be a group therapy session; a psychologist, seated several feet away and wearing a sport coat over body armor, plays an acoustic guitar and attempts to build trust by leading them in a...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2010
Lawrence Talbot's (Benicio Del Toro) stay in a mental asylum in "The Wolfman" is short, but quite memorable thanks to the ghoulish therapy devices created by production designer Rick Heinrichs. One of the most notable is the dunking chair that functions like a Victorian-era waterboarding torture. The hand-cranked chair (actually controlled by a motor) is tipped backward into a pool of freezing water using gears Heinrichs and crew salvaged from controls of a sluice gate. "They were experimenting at the time with mental illness and trying almost medieval treatment methods using people as guinea pigs," Heinrichs says.
SCIENCE
February 5, 2014 | By Monte Morin
Scientists have identified a simple, inexpensive compound that made cancer drugs more effective in mice and helped human patients weather the toxic side effects of chemotherapy. But even as they touted their experimental results, they acknowledged that their remedy was unlikely to inspire the vigorous - and expensive - research necessary to win regulatory approval and join the ranks of mainstream medicine. The drug in question is vitamin C. When absorbed from foods such as oranges, strawberries, broccoli and kale, it feeds neurotransmitters and helps the body make collagen, among other important functions.
SPORTS
February 4, 2014 | By Eric Pincus
The Lakers have hit the road for a three-game trip, but Pau Gasol remains in Los Angeles trying to recover from a groin injury. Gasol was declared out at least a week on Saturday after aggravating the injury in a Friday night loss to the Charlotte Bobcats. On Monday night, Gasol posted a photo on Instagram , revealing he underwent platelet-rich plasma therapy to help accelerate the healing process. The treatment involves drawing some of Gasol's own blood. The platelets, which promote healing, are then filtered to concentrate them, then injected directly into the problem area.
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