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Thermostat

NEWS
June 18, 1989 | STRAT DOUTHAT, Associated Press
In the years after the methodical murders of his wife, mother and three children in New Jersey, John Emil List painstakingly created a new identity for himself in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains. He dyed his hair and changed his name to establish new credit accounts and a phony Social Security number. He took a new wife, to whom he lied about his age and personal history. List finally was tripped up after nearly two decades in hiding because his new persona was made in his old image--that of a wimpy, bespectacled accountant whose life centered around the Lutheran Church.
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HOME & GARDEN
February 6, 1999 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
Sandwich makers and waffle irons have two cooking surfaces, each with a heating element. The temperatures are regulated by a built-in thermostat, often knob-controlled. The heating element used in most waffle irons and some sandwich makers is an exposed spring-like wire coil made from an alloy able to withstand high temperatures. This replaceable coil, called an open element, is suspended between ceramic insulating supports.
REAL ESTATE
July 2, 2000 | POPULAR MECHANICS
Question: Can I file down the wide tip on a polarized plug without bad effects? Answer: No. Inserting a polarized plug incorrectly, which is possible if you file down the wide prong, could cause a shock hazard by making the appliance cabinet live even when the switch is turned off. The slots in a polarized receptacle are different sizes to prevent this very thing. The wide slot is connected to the neutral wire and the narrow one to the hot wire.
SCIENCE
November 4, 2006 | Jia-Rui Chong, Times Staff Writer
A new study on genetically engineered mice appears to offer a novel way to live as much as 20% longer: Chill out. Scientists engineered mice to have body temperatures 0.5 to 0.9 degrees lower than normal mice. Female experimental mice lived a median of 662 days, about 112 days longer than normal female mice. Male experimental mice survived a median of 805 days, 89 days longer than their normal counterparts.
MAGAZINE
July 23, 2006
I wouldn't exactly lump the community of Hidden Hills in with the rest of the Valley ("Provence in the Valley," by Barbara Thornburg, Style, July 2). I can do without the 10,000-square-foot house and all the energy it takes to heat, cool and maintain it, the built-in outdoor pizza oven and the private chef. Instead I will do my best to reduce my energy consumption, turn my thermostat down and fire up the grill in the backyard of my home. Get real. Carey Okrand Via the Internet
HOME & GARDEN
December 10, 1994 | CYNDI Y. NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Who doesn't like to be waited on? Occasional tables with personality can hold snacks or reading material in small spaces and may be just the right piece to complete a playful setting or to lighten up a serious room. For those with sport in mind, Reginald is a caddie of wood, hand-painted and waiting to serve you.
HOME & GARDEN
November 21, 1992 | From Associated Press
Simple trouble-shooting of gas and electric water heaters is not difficult and can save you money as well as preventing potentially dangerous situations. A gas heater must have enough air to burn efficiently. If the heater shares space with the furnace and clothes dryer, then an ample air supply is even more important. When a burner is starved for air, it fires with an inefficient orange flame that jumps and pops.
REAL ESTATE
June 28, 1998 | POPULAR MECHANICS, FOR AP SPECIAL FEATURES
QUESTION: Most hot-water tanks have a dial for water temperatures at the bottom. They read hot, warm and normal. What would be the minimum temperature, the next temperature and then the hot temperature? I have heard of a code in most places that the minimum temperatures should be 120 degrees Fahrenheit and the maximum 140 degrees. ANSWER: Not all water heater manufacturers use the same names for the thermostat settings. Nevertheless, the settings are basically hot, medium and warm.
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