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Thermostat

REAL ESTATE
May 2, 1993 | From Popular Mechanics
QUESTION: Most hot water tanks have a dial for water temperatures at their bottom. They read hot, warm and normal. What would be the minimum temperature and the next temperature and then the hot temperature? I have heard of a code in most places that the minimum temperatures should be 120 degrees and the maximum 140 degrees. ANSWER: Not all water heater manufacturers use the same names for the thermostat settings. Nevertheless, the settings are basically hot, medium and warm.
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MAGAZINE
July 23, 2006
I wouldn't exactly lump the community of Hidden Hills in with the rest of the Valley ("Provence in the Valley," by Barbara Thornburg, Style, July 2). I can do without the 10,000-square-foot house and all the energy it takes to heat, cool and maintain it, the built-in outdoor pizza oven and the private chef. Instead I will do my best to reduce my energy consumption, turn my thermostat down and fire up the grill in the backyard of my home. Get real. Carey Okrand Via the Internet
HOME & GARDEN
December 10, 1994 | CYNDI Y. NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Who doesn't like to be waited on? Occasional tables with personality can hold snacks or reading material in small spaces and may be just the right piece to complete a playful setting or to lighten up a serious room. For those with sport in mind, Reginald is a caddie of wood, hand-painted and waiting to serve you.
HOME & GARDEN
November 21, 1992 | From Associated Press
Simple trouble-shooting of gas and electric water heaters is not difficult and can save you money as well as preventing potentially dangerous situations. A gas heater must have enough air to burn efficiently. If the heater shares space with the furnace and clothes dryer, then an ample air supply is even more important. When a burner is starved for air, it fires with an inefficient orange flame that jumps and pops.
NEWS
November 13, 2012 | By Jon Healey
In my previous post, I described the potential for a new era of automated manufacturing in which it's easier for entrepreneurs to create products but harder for workers to find jobs on the assembly line. A contrary note was sounded, ironically, by a robotics executive, who insisted that the next generation of smart machines would make human employees more valuable, not more dispensable. The executive, Rethink Robotics' Rodney Brooks, didn't offer any concrete examples to support his argument.
REAL ESTATE
June 28, 1998 | POPULAR MECHANICS, FOR AP SPECIAL FEATURES
QUESTION: Most hot-water tanks have a dial for water temperatures at the bottom. They read hot, warm and normal. What would be the minimum temperature, the next temperature and then the hot temperature? I have heard of a code in most places that the minimum temperatures should be 120 degrees Fahrenheit and the maximum 140 degrees. ANSWER: Not all water heater manufacturers use the same names for the thermostat settings. Nevertheless, the settings are basically hot, medium and warm.
REAL ESTATE
November 24, 1991 | From Popular Mechanics
QUESTION: What's the best way to store partly used cans of paint without having them develop a skin on the surface? ANSWER: Here are several solutions that have worked for us: * Store the can upside down. * Cut a piece of wax paper the same diameter as the inside of the can and drop it down on top of the paint. When you are ready to paint again, simply remove the paper and the paint under it will be ready to stir up and use without lumps or pieces of dried paint skin to strain out.
REAL ESTATE
April 1, 2001 | JAMES DULLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Question: To heat my home more economically, I considered a setback thermostat, but our family's daily schedule is never the same. Also, someone is always too warm or chilly year-round. Is a whole-house zoning system the answer for us? Answer: Adding a zoning system is the answer for almost any home, and I would not be surprised if it becomes standard equipment in every new home within 10 years.
REAL ESTATE
July 2, 2000 | POPULAR MECHANICS
Question: Can I file down the wide tip on a polarized plug without bad effects? Answer: No. Inserting a polarized plug incorrectly, which is possible if you file down the wide prong, could cause a shock hazard by making the appliance cabinet live even when the switch is turned off. The slots in a polarized receptacle are different sizes to prevent this very thing. The wide slot is connected to the neutral wire and the narrow one to the hot wire.
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