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Thermostat

HEALTH
February 27, 2012 | By Amber Dance, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Bonnie Addario didn't even know there was a word for what was happening to her. As if lung cancer weren't bad enough, the 54-year-old had lost 30 pounds off her normally 130-pound frame. Her life was limited to her husband's Barcalounger, where she had to recline because she lacked the strength to sit up straight. "It affected everything I did," says Addario, who is alive and well nine years later in San Carlos, Calif. "I literally could not get up and down the stairs. " There is a name for what Addario experienced: cachexia.
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OPINION
April 18, 2010 | By Eli Kintisch
You're likely to hear a chorus of dire warnings as we approach Earth Day, but there's a serious shortage few pundits are talking about: air pollution. That's right, the world is running short on air pollution, and if we continue to cut back on smoke pouring forth from industrial smokestacks, the increase in global warming could be profound. Cleaner air, one of the signature achievements of the U.S. environmental movement, is certainly worth celebrating. Scientists estimate that the U.S. Clean Air Act has cut a major air pollutant called sulfate aerosols, for example, by 30% to 50% since the 1980s, helping greatly reduce cases of asthma and other respiratory problems.
SCIENCE
November 4, 2006 | Jia-Rui Chong, Times Staff Writer
A new study on genetically engineered mice appears to offer a novel way to live as much as 20% longer: Chill out. Scientists engineered mice to have body temperatures 0.5 to 0.9 degrees lower than normal mice. Female experimental mice lived a median of 662 days, about 112 days longer than normal female mice. Male experimental mice survived a median of 805 days, 89 days longer than their normal counterparts.
MAGAZINE
July 23, 2006
I wouldn't exactly lump the community of Hidden Hills in with the rest of the Valley ("Provence in the Valley," by Barbara Thornburg, Style, July 2). I can do without the 10,000-square-foot house and all the energy it takes to heat, cool and maintain it, the built-in outdoor pizza oven and the private chef. Instead I will do my best to reduce my energy consumption, turn my thermostat down and fire up the grill in the backyard of my home. Get real. Carey Okrand Via the Internet
HOME & GARDEN
December 10, 1994 | CYNDI Y. NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Who doesn't like to be waited on? Occasional tables with personality can hold snacks or reading material in small spaces and may be just the right piece to complete a playful setting or to lighten up a serious room. For those with sport in mind, Reginald is a caddie of wood, hand-painted and waiting to serve you.
HOME & GARDEN
November 21, 1992 | From Associated Press
Simple trouble-shooting of gas and electric water heaters is not difficult and can save you money as well as preventing potentially dangerous situations. A gas heater must have enough air to burn efficiently. If the heater shares space with the furnace and clothes dryer, then an ample air supply is even more important. When a burner is starved for air, it fires with an inefficient orange flame that jumps and pops.
TRAVEL
March 14, 2010 | By Judy Mandell
Bad things can happen at your hotel. Your reservation may be lost. The front desk agent may be rude. The room may be dirty. A naked man may be sitting on the bed. The room may be too hot or too cold, and the thermostat may not work. The TV in the next room may be blasting. The soap or shampoo may be missing. The toilet may flush continually. The tub may not drain. Room service breakfast may arrive an hour late and cold. The line to check out may be long, and the room charges may be wrong.
REAL ESTATE
June 28, 1998 | POPULAR MECHANICS, FOR AP SPECIAL FEATURES
QUESTION: Most hot-water tanks have a dial for water temperatures at the bottom. They read hot, warm and normal. What would be the minimum temperature, the next temperature and then the hot temperature? I have heard of a code in most places that the minimum temperatures should be 120 degrees Fahrenheit and the maximum 140 degrees. ANSWER: Not all water heater manufacturers use the same names for the thermostat settings. Nevertheless, the settings are basically hot, medium and warm.
REAL ESTATE
May 2, 1993 | From Popular Mechanics
QUESTION: Most hot water tanks have a dial for water temperatures at their bottom. They read hot, warm and normal. What would be the minimum temperature and the next temperature and then the hot temperature? I have heard of a code in most places that the minimum temperatures should be 120 degrees and the maximum 140 degrees. ANSWER: Not all water heater manufacturers use the same names for the thermostat settings. Nevertheless, the settings are basically hot, medium and warm.
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