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NEWS
December 11, 1988 | BOB BAKER, Times Staff Writer
Elias Lopez never had a chance. He got sucked into something so much stronger than he was, something with a history so powerful, that there seemed no choice but to submit. He was 17, a nice, quietly handsome young man with jet-black hair and a plan. He was going to be a cop, a narcotics investigator. Sure, there were street gangs in his neighborhood, but he did not want to join one. All Elias wanted to do was look like a gang member.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
Stephen Colbert has made a career out of conducting uncomfortable interviews, but on Thursday he brought new meaning to the term "cringe-worthy" when he sat down with former intelligence official Philip Mudd.  Mudd, who has served as the deputy director of the CIA's counter-terrorist center and as a senior intelligence advisor at the FBI, stopped by the show to talk about his new book, "Takedown: Inside the Hunt for Al Qaeda. " Let's just say he's no Saul Berenson.  The conversation began pleasantly enough, with Mudd discussing the changes to Al Qaeda over the past 12 years and emphasizing the importance of human informants in the fight against terrorism.  PHOTOS: Celebrities by The Times But then Colbert made a joke about "Homeland," and, well, things got awkward very quickly.
SPORTS
May 17, 1987 | THOMAS FERRARO, United Press International
Joe Paterno shifts uncomfortably on the couch of his office at Penn State University and makes a confession about his holier-than-thou image. "It scares the heck out of me," booms the hallowed football coach. "Because I know I'm not that clean. Nobody is that clean." "I don't want to appear to be any more than I am," says Paterno, now speaking in a near whisper. "And that's a good, hard-working coach who is a decent guy, a family guy, who doesn't want to cheat." "I lose my temper sometimes.
MAGAZINE
July 23, 1989 | JOY HOROWITZ, Joy Horowitz's last story for this magazine was "Dr. Amnio."
REMEMBERING HER DAYS AS A young girl--"No one would have accused me of being a happy child"--Leslie Abramson has an enduring memory of her favorite means of escape. After school, at the corner luncheonette, she'd buy button candies and chocolate marshmallow twists (two for a nickel) and spend hours at the comic-book racks, reading. Mad magazine was good for a giggle. But it was the spooky stuff, the horror comics like "Tales From the Crypt," that she really loved. And hated, too.
NEWS
June 4, 1998 | KATHRYN BOLD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the rarefied, regimented world of ballroom dancing, an incident in 1982 proved nothing short of a fashion coup: During an international competition, half a dozen of the world's reigning ballroom dancers--queens of the floor--threw down their tutus. For decades they'd been consigned to wear short skirts with layer upon layer of netting that made them look as if they had stick legs and huge hips. They'd had enough.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1987 | Herbert J. Vida
Lynn Sarkisian admits he's afraid of riding in big roller coasters. But he's not afraid to build them, albeit on a miniature scale. "I've been on a couple of real roller coasters," he said, while standing next to his miniature creation, "and I was scared to death." His biggest fright occurred years ago on the old Long Beach roller coaster when he slid off the seat and had to hold on for dear life. "I didn't enjoy the rides then, and I still don't enjoy them," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1988 | ANDREA FORD, Times Staff Writer
So you want to grouse about paying almost a quarter for a postage stamp? Consider this: Newport Beach lawyer Michael T. Walsh paid $75,000 for one Thursday. And the picture on it isn't even right side up. The stamp was issued by the Iranian government in 1950 and still is glued to an envelope. It is, according to a stamp broker, the most expensive Iranian stamp ever sold, and it is thought to be one of only two of its kind still in existence.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1987 | SANDRA HANSEN KONTE, Konte is a San Francisco journalist
I can't wait until I'm 45 and get all those great parts. --Elizabeth Hartman, in a 1971 interview. The first reports of 43-year-old Elizabeth Hartman's June 10 suicide here were sketchy. Homicide detectives weren't sure just who the slight woman was who had thrown herself from the fifth-story window of her efficiency apartment. A handful of neighbors volunteered what they knew. She was an unemployed actress, they thought, who had starred long ago in some movie with Sidney Poitier.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 2000 | SUE FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hours before he was killed, Nick Markowitz thought he was finally going home. It had been a strange, often scary two-day odyssey since a group of young men had snatched him off the street in his West Hills neighborhood and carted him up the coast to Santa Barbara, according to testimony before a Santa Barbara County grand jury released last week.
SPORTS
January 25, 1986 | JERRY CROWE, Times Staff Writer
Flo Hyman, perhaps the most recognizable name in international volleyball, collapsed during a match in Japan Friday night and died of heart failure. A member of the U.S. Olympic team that won a silver medal in the 1984 Games at Long Beach, Hyman, 31, was playing for Daiei, Inc., in a Japanese women's league match against Hitachi, Ltd., in Matsue City, about 380 miles west of Tokyo.
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