Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsThings
IN THE NEWS

Things

NEWS
September 5, 1987 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Morton Feldman, an expressionistic composer who gloried in his iconoclasm as he both irritated and intrigued audiences with esoteric exercises in form and melody, died Thursday of cancer. He was 61 and had been in a hospital in Buffalo, N.Y., near the State University of Buffalo where he had taught for the last 15 years. Although based in New York most of his life, Feldman taught across the country, primarily at conservatories and colleges where his works normally were performed.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1985 | ROBERT HILBURN
. . . a time comes when two people should think of these things. Having a home and a family Facing up to their responsibilities. --Bruce Springsteen's "I Wanna Marry You," 1980. Bruce Springsteen's wedding plans gave the rock 'n' roll world this week one of its hottest pieces of gossip since the "Paul Is Dead" rumors in the '60s. Only this time, the reports turned out to be true. The uproar began Thursday when a Portland, Ore.
NEWS
December 11, 1988 | BOB BAKER, Times Staff Writer
Elias Lopez never had a chance. He got sucked into something so much stronger than he was, something with a history so powerful, that there seemed no choice but to submit. He was 17, a nice, quietly handsome young man with jet-black hair and a plan. He was going to be a cop, a narcotics investigator. Sure, there were street gangs in his neighborhood, but he did not want to join one. All Elias wanted to do was look like a gang member.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1999 | ALISA VALDES-RODRIGUEZ, Alisa Valdes-Rodriguez is a Times staff writer
Chris Perez is staring at his 4-month-old daughter, Cassie, who at this moment rests in the arms of her smiling mother, Venessa Villanueva. Perez's bright and beaming face is nothing like it appears in the mournful publicity shots for "Resurrection," the debut rock album by his new group, the Chris Perez Band, due out on Hollywood Records on May 18. No. A grinning, affable new daddy just ain't what one would expect of the most famous 29-year-old widower in pop music.
SPORTS
May 17, 1987 | THOMAS FERRARO, United Press International
Joe Paterno shifts uncomfortably on the couch of his office at Penn State University and makes a confession about his holier-than-thou image. "It scares the heck out of me," booms the hallowed football coach. "Because I know I'm not that clean. Nobody is that clean." "I don't want to appear to be any more than I am," says Paterno, now speaking in a near whisper. "And that's a good, hard-working coach who is a decent guy, a family guy, who doesn't want to cheat." "I lose my temper sometimes.
MAGAZINE
July 23, 1989 | JOY HOROWITZ, Joy Horowitz's last story for this magazine was "Dr. Amnio."
REMEMBERING HER DAYS AS A young girl--"No one would have accused me of being a happy child"--Leslie Abramson has an enduring memory of her favorite means of escape. After school, at the corner luncheonette, she'd buy button candies and chocolate marshmallow twists (two for a nickel) and spend hours at the comic-book racks, reading. Mad magazine was good for a giggle. But it was the spooky stuff, the horror comics like "Tales From the Crypt," that she really loved. And hated, too.
NEWS
June 4, 1998 | KATHRYN BOLD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the rarefied, regimented world of ballroom dancing, an incident in 1982 proved nothing short of a fashion coup: During an international competition, half a dozen of the world's reigning ballroom dancers--queens of the floor--threw down their tutus. For decades they'd been consigned to wear short skirts with layer upon layer of netting that made them look as if they had stick legs and huge hips. They'd had enough.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1987 | Herbert J. Vida
Lynn Sarkisian admits he's afraid of riding in big roller coasters. But he's not afraid to build them, albeit on a miniature scale. "I've been on a couple of real roller coasters," he said, while standing next to his miniature creation, "and I was scared to death." His biggest fright occurred years ago on the old Long Beach roller coaster when he slid off the seat and had to hold on for dear life. "I didn't enjoy the rides then, and I still don't enjoy them," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1988 | ANDREA FORD, Times Staff Writer
So you want to grouse about paying almost a quarter for a postage stamp? Consider this: Newport Beach lawyer Michael T. Walsh paid $75,000 for one Thursday. And the picture on it isn't even right side up. The stamp was issued by the Iranian government in 1950 and still is glued to an envelope. It is, according to a stamp broker, the most expensive Iranian stamp ever sold, and it is thought to be one of only two of its kind still in existence.
MAGAZINE
January 25, 1987 | WILLIAM JORDAN, William Jordan is Long Beach-based science writer.
I was lying there one morning last October, somewhere between one-third and one-quarter conscious in the softening darkness. The first sounds of dawn were tinkling dimly in the distance as a mockingbird warmed his throat for the day's performance. Then, suddenly, I was bolt upright in bed like a stepped-on rake. The mockingbirds had gone back to regular hours.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|