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BUSINESS
August 9, 1989 | From Reuters
The United States will open an investigation of worker rights and expropriation policies in eight developing countries, the U.S. Trade Representative's Office said Tuesday. If violations of American trade policies are found, the nations could lose their low-tariff benefits for exports to the United States under the Generalized System of Preferences program.
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NEWS
March 7, 1995 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Workers of the world, beware. With the worst unemployment crisis since the Great Depression at hand, almost one in every three workers--or 820 million out of 2.8 billion--is either without a job or underemployed, according to the International Labor Organization. That chilling statistic underscores how, of all the world's changes at the end of the millennium, the upheaval in jobs may have the deepest impact on the average person.
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NEWS
March 7, 1995 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Workers of the world, beware. With the worst unemployment crisis since the Great Depression at hand, almost one in every three workers--or 820 million out of 2.8 billion--is either without a job or underemployed, according to the International Labor Organization. That chilling statistic underscores how, of all the world's changes at the end of the millennium, the upheaval in jobs may have the deepest impact on the average person.
NEWS
August 6, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With her cherubic face, purple T-shirt and jeans, Mukda looks like a fairly typical 14-year-old from the rural areas of Thailand. She stands barely 4 1/2 feet tall and giggles bashfully when asked a personal question. Until police rescued her in late July, Mukda was a slave. Eight months earlier, she had been brought to Bangkok from her village near the Myanmar border and sold to a brothel by her stepfather. Every night, seven days a week, Mukda was forced to sleep with five or six men.
NEWS
August 6, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With her cherubic face, purple T-shirt and jeans, Mukda looks like a fairly typical 14-year-old from the rural areas of Thailand. She stands barely 4 1/2 feet tall and giggles bashfully when asked a personal question. Until police rescued her in late July, Mukda was a slave. Eight months earlier, she had been brought to Bangkok from her village near the Myanmar border and sold to a brothel by her stepfather. Every night, seven days a week, Mukda was forced to sleep with five or six men.
OPINION
January 22, 2004
Re "Love's OK, but Hate Keeps Us Together," Commentary, Jan. 20: Crispin Sartwell argues, following Heraclitus and others, that hate is a progressive engine of change. Academics, and maybe arms dealers, love this kind of talk. In a ludicrous cherry-picking of ancient sources and detestable quotes, he argues that hate is a unifying force throughout all societies. He says, in closing, that as the universe was born in conflagration, and since we are part of this universe, we are "exploding [read: with exclusionary hate]
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1998
While it is heartening to see an economist who actually cares about people and the poor, Amartya Sen still manages to perpetuate some important misconceptions about the politics of famine (Commentary, Oct. 16). There have been famine conditions in the U.S., especially on Native American reservations in the 19th and early 20th century. Chronic hunger is still a widespread problem in the U.S. today. Sen also mistakenly attributes the lack of famine in the First World to our democratic governments and relatively free press.
OPINION
May 7, 2005
Re "Why So Many Jobs Have Wanderlust," Opinion, May 1: Businesses stand on three legs: sales, operations and back office. Kenneth Swift has just facilitated the amputation of his company's supporting limb. Sure, Praveen works for a lot less and may have advanced degrees, but does he have an ounce of real loyalty? I have seen countless examples of clerical workers spending nights and weekends fixing and undoing the catastrophic miscalculations of executives like Swift. They do it because they belong to an organization and want that organization to succeed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1987 | CHRISTOPHER B. LEINBERGER, Christopher B. Leinberger is a managing partner of Robert Charles Lesser & Co., an urban development and real estate firm in Beverly Hills. His commentary is adapted from "Los Angeles Comes of Age," an article co-authored with Charles Lockwood in the January issue of the Atlantic Monthly
Last year, Greater Los Angeles produced $250 billion worth of goods and services, making the 12.6-million-person metropolitan area the world's 11th-largest "nation" in terms of gross national product, ahead of Australia, India, Mexico, Sweden and Switzerland. In coming years, the region's economy will grow even larger, according to Southern California Assn. of Governments projections, and the number of jobs is expected to jump from approximately 6 million at present to 8 million in 2000.
BUSINESS
December 4, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
That's the suggestion buried within this item from Reuters. The item reports that Peugeot closed its assembly plant in Nigeria some years ago, and that " Africa's growing middle-class" has shifted out of Peugeot sedans and into Toyota Land Cruisers as status symbols. If this is so, it's proper to mark the end of an era. To old hands in East, South and West Africa, the Peugeot 504 was a familiar sight on highways, byways, dirt roads and mud flats. Our family acquired one shortly after arriving in Nairobi in 1988, and it served us for nearly five years, surviving indescribably potholed roads and one broadsiding by a couple of joyriders from Kenya President Moi's personal motor escort.
BUSINESS
August 9, 1989 | From Reuters
The United States will open an investigation of worker rights and expropriation policies in eight developing countries, the U.S. Trade Representative's Office said Tuesday. If violations of American trade policies are found, the nations could lose their low-tariff benefits for exports to the United States under the Generalized System of Preferences program.
WORLD
June 3, 2007 | Christian Retzlaff and Jeffrey Fleishman, Times Staff Writers
Sporadic violence erupted Saturday in this port city as radicals, their faces hidden by hoods and bandannas, broke from a largely peaceful anti-globalization protest and attacked police with sticks, bottles and Molotov cocktails ahead of this week's summit of leading industrialized nations. Authorities said 146 police officers were injured, 25 of them seriously; 78 demonstrators were arrested or taken into temporary custody.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1996 | Tom Plate, Times columnist Tom Plate also teaches at UCLA. He can be reached by e-mail at:
Does America's first Asian American governor feel a need to chat with President Clinton about the European bias of U.S. foreign policy while at the Democratic National Convention this week? Benjamin J. Cayetano smiles and struggles to put on his best diplomatic face: "Asians do complain to me that they don't think Clinton gets it. But the president is driven by politics--by the Israeli lobby, plus long ties to England and France. We understand. I'm an optimist about Clinton.
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