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ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1990
I do not consider myself a "narrow-minded ignoramus" (as Rosenberg described opponents of the episode). I am an avid fan of "thirtysomething." However, I do not accept homosexuality as a normal lifestyle and was highly insulted by the episode in question. If the producers actually believe that most Americans would do matchmaking for gay men, as the characters did, they are more out of touch with mainstream America than I ever thought possible. Bravo to the sponsors who caused ABC to lose more than $1 million in advertising.
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SPORTS
March 8, 2014 | By Ben Bolch
For old-timer's sake Washington Wizards Coach Randy Wittman , on the collective play of Andre Miller , 37, Al Harrington , 34, and Drew Gooden , 32: "We had the AARP group in there. It was doing pretty good. You can see it in practice and out here on the floor. They're getting their legs under them a little bit more and more each day. They gave us a big boost. " The silent treatment San Antonio Coach Gregg Popovich , on how he handles his team in games when things aren't going well: "Sometimes in timeouts I'll say, 'I've got nothing for you. What do you want me to do?
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1987 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
The 35-year-old TV producers sat opposite each other, slouched like two boys shooting the breeze, their sneakered feet propped on a coffee table in a cluttered Studio City office that resembled a large playroom. From time to time, Ed Zwick tossed a ball toward the ceiling. The game is prime time, though, and like the seven characters in their charming, inventive series, the creators of ABC's new "thirtysomething" are doing a lot of improvising--flying by the shiny seats of their ragged jeans.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2013 | By Jeffrey Fleishman
One suspects the world is out of kilter when a French girl utters cultural sacrilege: "Love is stronger than death? What a load of bull. " The girl in question, Camille, has returned from the dead, unbruised and unbloodied and looking just as she did four years earlier, before her school bus rounded a reservoir and sailed off a mountain. She does not devour flesh or walk in spastic shuffles. She's a zombie in the European style, moving with grace, pouting and posing existential questions in a mountain village where the water is rising and animals are up to strange things.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2009 | Maria Elena Fernandez
Long before there was an Ally McBeal waxing neurotic about love or a Carrie Bradshaw leading the glamorous life, there was Melissa Steadman, the artsy cousin of Michael (Ken Olin) that female fans of "thirtysomething" longed to be like. She was independent, creative, quirky and funny -- a single woman in her 30s who had a love affair with a younger man. (Yes, even before cougars became something other than a four-legged mammal.) As a TV series, "thirtysomething" was known for its intimate look at marriage and relationships at a time when gender roles were dramatically changing.
OPINION
August 27, 2009 | MEGHAN DAUM
There's a delectable symmetry in the fact that the long-awaited DVDs of "thirtysomething," that late 1980s paean to yuppie disquietude and silver-tongued solipsism, have unleashed themselves on us just a week after the flurry of excitement surrounding season three of "Mad Men." I won't go so far as to say the latter show wouldn't have been possible without the former (it's a superior product and very much its own entity), but the programs do have a few eerie commonalities. For starters, they both traffic in the complicated emotions that arise from the relationship between human beings and advertising (we know we're being manipulated, but we reach for our wallets nonetheless)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2009 | MARY McNAMARA, TELEVISION CRITIC
When "thirtysomething" debuted, I was still a young twentysomething. Although I am, to my everlasting dismay, technically a tail-end baby boomer, my friends and I came of age in the midst of boomer disillusionment, when organized protest had dropped to an inescapable social whine. Love beads gave way to power shoulders, hippies morphed into yuppies and the only solace was irony. (This was a self-indulgent generational viewpoint too, of course, but that took me a few more years to understand.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2009 | Scott Collins
Twenty-two years ago this fall, just before ABC premiered "thirtysomething," the producers were keeping their expectations low. "We wanted to make movies," Marshall Herskovitz, who created the era-defining drama about a group of yuppie pals in Philadelphia with writing partner Edward Zwick, explained in a recent interview. "We thought if we do something that is so specific to us and our friends, no one will watch it, it will be quickly canceled, and we can get back to making movies."
NEWS
April 3, 1988
We thought the Lakers were the best thing on television until we discovered "thirtysomething." Poignant topics, sensitive, clever dialogue, believable acting. Those of us who are thirtysomething enjoy this realistic slice of life. Elly Beugen, Los Angeles
NEWS
January 10, 1988
The Dec. 15 episode of "thirtysomething" was really something! And every one of the previous shows was also well thought out and acted. Milton F. Zimmerman, Pacific Palisades
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2012 | By Stephanie Zacharek, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In the movies of Todd Solondz, the world is a horrible place populated by miserable or unkind people. While there's plenty of misery and unkindness in the director's seventh full-length feature,"Dark Horse," Solondz also gives us something new, or at least less self-consciously misanthropic. "Dark Horse" is a glum little sort-of comedy brushed with melancholic sweetness; for once, Solondz seems less interested in scoring points off his characters than in creeping into their shy, sad interior worlds.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2012 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
Few would have imagined that one of the most powerful and acclaimed protest songs of the year, "Reagan," would be about the Iran-Contra scandal of the 1980s, name-check Oliver North and feature the final words, "I'm glad Reagan's dead. " Decades old geopolitical scandals aren't exactly hot topics among the Facebook generation. Even fewer would have predicted that the song would arrive via a 37-year-old Atlanta rapper called Killer Mike who'd been through the major label system a decade earlier but had since virtually vanished from the national hip-hop conversation while the next generation staked its claim.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2012 | By David Undercoffler, Los Angeles Times
The Verano is a new compact sedan from that near-luxury nameplate, Buick. It's an impressive, competitively priced car; a stellar cut from the quiet and comfortable motoring cloth. A great car in many respects, the Verano is also an unmitigated failure. It's more off-key than Rosanne Barr's rendition of "The Star Spangled Banner. " It's a strikeout the size of "Gigli," Crystal Pepsi or Charlie Brown's place-kicking career. Yep, a single car is poised to both flourish and fail.
BUSINESS
January 13, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
Hoping to follow in the footsteps of National Lampoon, the digital-comedy company CollegeHumor Media is taking a stab at the film business. The firm has signed on to make a movie about thirtysomething underachievers called "Coffee Town," buying a script from former "Arrested Development" writer-producer Brad Copeland and hiring him to direct it. The low-budget movie, which will star a group of up-and-coming actors, is being financed by CollegeHumor and...
NEWS
June 20, 2011 | By Patrick Kevin Day, Los Angeles Times
It's long been said that there are no new ideas in Hollywood. But we have to admit that there have been some pretty good new incarnations of the old ones. Here we trace the possible genetic forebears of AMC's "Mad Men. " PREMISE "Mad Men": A poor Korean war soldier reinvents himself as a suave ad executive and family man and confronts the increasingly complicated sexual politics of the 1960s. "thirtysomething": Peace-loving hippies of the 1960s reinvent themselves as ad executives and family men and confront the increasingly complicated sexual politics of the 1980s.
HOME & GARDEN
October 9, 2009 | By Lauren Beale
Producer Marshall Herskovitz has purchased an equestrian property in Calabasas for $4.1 million. The ranch has a Mediterranean-style house with six bedrooms and seven bathrooms in 7,000 square feet, a seven-stall barn, two arenas, pastureland and a separate caretaker apartment. The remodeled home's family room opens to a wrap-around veranda overlooking the swimming pool area. An outdoor living area has a hacienda-style fireplace and barbecue. There are mature oak trees and a creek.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2009
How does Winnie Holzman not make the roll call of "thirtysomething" writers ["Eightiessomething," Aug. 23]? She not only wrote several of their most memorable episodes but went on to create "My So-Called Life" and write the book for "Wicked." Melissa, Hope, Nancy, Ellyn, Michael, Elliot and Gary would have a lot to say about such an omission. Sylvia Green Burbank
OPINION
August 27, 2009 | MEGHAN DAUM
There's a delectable symmetry in the fact that the long-awaited DVDs of "thirtysomething," that late 1980s paean to yuppie disquietude and silver-tongued solipsism, have unleashed themselves on us just a week after the flurry of excitement surrounding season three of "Mad Men." I won't go so far as to say the latter show wouldn't have been possible without the former (it's a superior product and very much its own entity), but the programs do have a few eerie commonalities. For starters, they both traffic in the complicated emotions that arise from the relationship between human beings and advertising (we know we're being manipulated, but we reach for our wallets nonetheless)
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