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ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2009 | Harriet Ryan; Chris Lee
A Los Angeles Superior Court judge has approved a deal with Sony Music Entertainment to allow the soundtrack for the Michael Jackson movie "This Is It" to be released at the same time as the theatrical roll-out of the film. The move enables Sony and the superstar's estate to cash in on some synergistic marketing at a time when demand for Jackson-related properties remains high. In court documents, special administrators for Jackson's estate John Branca and John McClain had argued the deal would provide the estate with "an immediate and substantial cash advance from Sony."
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November 1, 2009 | BOOTH MOORE, FASHION CRITIC
In "Michael Jackson's This Is It," moviegoers will not see the elaborate costumes created for the tour that never was, bedazzled with 4 million Swarovski crystals and lighted up using LED technology. Those are on display at the O2 Arena in London, where the engagement had been scheduled to begin in July, and will go on to New York and Tokyo. But what they will see, in addition to tough and tender moments that humanize the pop singer, and one hell of a music and dance show, is an amazing array of designer outfits Jackson wore to rehearsals.
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BUSINESS
October 22, 2009 | Ben Fritz and John Horn
In late July, a month after Michael Jackson died from the effects of a powerful anesthetic plus other medications, Sony Pictures bid $60 million for a movie after seeing just 97 seconds of footage. That brief clip was a glimpse of more than 100 hours that concert promoter AEG Live shot of the late singer during rehearsals for a planned London concert series called "This Is It." "We had a very strong gut feeling that this could be a cultural event despite the fact that none of us really saw any of the footage before we concluded the deal," said Sony's production president, Doug Belgrad.
BUSINESS
October 22, 2009 | Ben Fritz and John Horn
In late July, a month after Michael Jackson died from the effects of a powerful anesthetic plus other medications, Sony Pictures bid $60 million for a movie after seeing just 97 seconds of footage. That brief clip was a glimpse of more than 100 hours that concert promoter AEG Live shot of the late singer during rehearsals for a planned London concert series called "This Is It." "We had a very strong gut feeling that this could be a cultural event despite the fact that none of us really saw any of the footage before we concluded the deal," said Sony's production president, Doug Belgrad.
IMAGE
November 1, 2009 | BOOTH MOORE, FASHION CRITIC
In "Michael Jackson's This Is It," moviegoers will not see the elaborate costumes created for the tour that never was, bedazzled with 4 million Swarovski crystals and lighted up using LED technology. Those are on display at the O2 Arena in London, where the engagement had been scheduled to begin in July, and will go on to New York and Tokyo. But what they will see, in addition to tough and tender moments that humanize the pop singer, and one hell of a music and dance show, is an amazing array of designer outfits Jackson wore to rehearsals.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2010
Filmmaker Jean-Luc Godard will not be coming to Hollywood to accept his honorary Academy Award. Academy President Tom Sherak said Monday that he had gotten word from Godard that the 79-year-old director would not attend the Governors Awards on Nov. 13, when honorary Oscars are presented. The decision followed what the academy called a cordial, two-month exchange with the iconoclastic filmmaker, a pioneer of the French New Wave who has taken potshots at Hollywood over the years.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2009 | Harriet Ryan; Chris Lee
A Los Angeles Superior Court judge has approved a deal with Sony Music Entertainment to allow the soundtrack for the Michael Jackson movie "This Is It" to be released at the same time as the theatrical roll-out of the film. The move enables Sony and the superstar's estate to cash in on some synergistic marketing at a time when demand for Jackson-related properties remains high. In court documents, special administrators for Jackson's estate John Branca and John McClain had argued the deal would provide the estate with "an immediate and substantial cash advance from Sony."
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