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Thomas Beecham

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 1991 | CHRIS PASLES
All conductors share the same problem. Other musicians can rehearse on their instruments at their leisure. A conductor can't. He has to have a group of live musicians in front of him, and, especially at the start of his career, he's strictly a beginner trying to get his ideas across. Composer Hans Pfitzner gives an idea of how complex the situation is.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 1991 | CHRIS PASLES
All conductors share the same problem. Other musicians can rehearse on their instruments at their leisure. A conductor can't. He has to have a group of live musicians in front of him, and, especially at the start of his career, he's strictly a beginner trying to get his ideas across. Composer Hans Pfitzner gives an idea of how complex the situation is.
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NEWS
February 14, 1994
Norman Del Mar, 74, British conductor and author who focused on works of Sir Edward Elgar, Gustav Mahler and Richard Strauss. Del Mar began his career as a horn player with the Royal Philharmonic and became an assistant to conductor Sir Thomas Beecham. He made his debut as a conductor in 1947. He led many foreign tours for the philharmonic, the English Chamber Orchestra and Northern Sinfonia and the BBC Symphony Orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
With its show-business staging of Mozart's "The Magic Flute" as a cheekily animated silent movie, Los Angeles Opera on Saturday night got what it very much needs. That this will be a hit goes without saying. But what this once pioneering company really needs right now is a reason to be talked about again. So let's talk about Barrie Kosky, one of the hot directors on the international scene and, like most hot directors on the international scene, ignored in America. Not too many American opera companies dare hire directors who put buckets of excrement onstage, as Kosky did in a recent German production of Janácek's "From the House of the Dead.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1999
Years ago in a production of Verdi's "Aida," the story goes, a nervous elephant relieved itself onstage, prompting conductor Sir Thomas Beecham to remark, "Gad, what a critic!" I never thought so much excrement would again be presented on the stage of a major opera house--that is, until the MTV Video Music Awards ("Opera House Turns Hip-Hop Stage for MTV Awards," by Elysa Gardner, Sept. 11). It was appalling when host Chris Rock began by exclaiming, "I may be the first black man in history to take the stage of the Met without a mop."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 1997 | Timothy Mangan
They say that Frederick Delius (1862-1934) is an acquired taste, and the British, so far, are mainly the ones who have acquired it, thanks largely to the efforts of conductor Thomas Beecham. The present disc goes down easy enough, though, and it has some claims on American interest.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1992 | WALTER PRICE
MOZART: "Die Zauberflote." Tiana Lemnitz, Erna Berger, Helge Roswaenge, Gerhard Husch, Wilhelm Strienz, others; Berlin Philharmonic, conducted by Sir Thomas Beecham. Nimbus NI 7827/8. MOZART: "Die Zauberflote." Barbara Hendricks, June Anderson, Jerry Hadley, Thomas Allen, Robert Lloyd, others; Scottish Chamber Orchestra, conducted by Sir Charles Mackerras. Telarc CD 80302. MOZART: "Die Zauberflote."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 1990 | BRUCE BURROUGHS
More than a few orchestras in the last couple decades have discovered a particular equation: the addition of Gary Karr as soloist equals a sure-fire success almost regardless of what else goes on. Saturday night at St. Andrew's Auditorium, conductor Ami Porat hedged his bets, sandwiching the renowned double bassist's appearance with the Mozart Camerata between a Mozart overture and a Beethoven symphony.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1999
Margaret Sagarese's reflections on Chris Rock at MTV include the invitation to call her "crazy" or "old-fashioned" ("Put Between Rock and a Hard Place," Counterpunch, Sept. 20). She is neither. She is just out of touch with theater. Way out. Has she forgotten Don Rickles? Joan Rivers? Does she remember Lenny Bruce? Does she have any notion of the traditions of social criticism in theater, sometimes the only places where criticism is tolerated? She can look all the way back to England and France and Germany, not to mention Greece and Rome.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1985 | ALBERT GOLDBERG
The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra of London covered a lot of ground in Royce Hall on Tuesday night. It started by paying tribute to Aaron Copland, turned into a father-and-son act with Beethoven's Piano Concerto No. 4, tried desperately to make something of Tchaikovsky's "Pathetique" Symphony and ended as a pop concert with three ultra-pop encores. The Royal Philharmonic, founded by Sir Thomas Beecham in 1946, was last heard here in Royce Hall in 1969, Antal Dorati conducting.
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