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NEWS
August 9, 1997 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Colombians saw new hope for improving their embittered relations with the United States in this week's brief visit by Thomas A. Constantine, the head of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration. Yet Constantine's whistle-stop Thursday also clearly indicated that the prospect of reconciliation does not extend to President Ernesto Samper, whose 1994 election campaign has been the target of persistent accusations that it was financed in part by drug money.
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NEWS
May 25, 1999 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thomas A. Constantine, a onetime state trooper in New York who rose to become head of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, announced Monday that he is resigning his post after five years to spend more time with his family. The 60-year-old Constantine said in an interview that, although he is proud of increases in drug arrests and seizures made by his 4,600 agents around the world, international drug cartels have proved an increasing menace. "I don't think we've lost ground.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1997
Drug Enforcement administrator Thomas Constantine's comments berating the Murphy Brown character for "abusing" marijuana to counteract the nauseous effects of chemotherapy again confirms the sad fact that these drug "warriors" consistently ignore the views of the majority of Americans who realize the obvious difference between substance use and substance abuse (" 'Murphy' Irks DEA Head," Morning Report, Nov. 7). JIM HARRIGAN Rancho Palos Verdes Drug Enforcement administrator Thomas Constantine recently objected to the message he considered contained in the recent "Murphy Brown" episode concerning the medical use of marijuana.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1997
Drug Enforcement administrator Thomas Constantine's comments berating the Murphy Brown character for "abusing" marijuana to counteract the nauseous effects of chemotherapy again confirms the sad fact that these drug "warriors" consistently ignore the views of the majority of Americans who realize the obvious difference between substance use and substance abuse (" 'Murphy' Irks DEA Head," Morning Report, Nov. 7). JIM HARRIGAN Rancho Palos Verdes Drug Enforcement administrator Thomas Constantine recently objected to the message he considered contained in the recent "Murphy Brown" episode concerning the medical use of marijuana.
NEWS
May 25, 1999 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thomas A. Constantine, a onetime state trooper in New York who rose to become head of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, announced Monday that he is resigning his post after five years to spend more time with his family. The 60-year-old Constantine said in an interview that, although he is proud of increases in drug arrests and seizures made by his 4,600 agents around the world, international drug cartels have proved an increasing menace. "I don't think we've lost ground.
NEWS
January 12, 1994 | From a Times Staff Writer
New York State Police Supt. Thomas Constantine is expected to be tapped this week by President Clinton to head the Drug Enforcement Administration, sources said Tuesday. Constantine, whose appointment requires Senate confirmation, would succeed former U.S. District Judge Robert C. Bonner, a George Bush Administration appointee who resigned in October to return to Los Angeles to practice law. The DEA chief oversees a 3,500-agent organization whose mission is to enforce the nation's drug laws.
NEWS
December 17, 1994 | RONALD J. OSTROW and PAUL LIEBERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Federal law enforcement authorities Friday took the cover off a nearly three-year money-laundering investigation that set up a Caribbean offshore bank to penetrate the Colombian Cali drug cartel and damaged a link between the cartel and a rising Italian organized crime group. In addition to producing 88 arrests and the seizure of about 9 tons of cocaine and $52 million in cash and property, Operation Dinero took possession of three paintings purportedly by Rubens, Reynolds and Picasso.
NEWS
September 4, 1994 | Associated Press
Five U.S. narcotics enforcement special agents who perished in a plane crash in the Andes Mountains last week were honored Saturday as martyrs to the struggle for a safer America and world. "They have given their lives so that you and I and all who come after us can live in a safer, better world," Atty. Gen. Janet Reno told relatives and colleagues after the five flag-draped coffins arrived at Andrews Air Force Base, Md.
NEWS
June 1, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Britain appointed a former U.S. law enforcement official to oversee reform of the Northern Ireland police force, one of the most divisive goals of the province's peace accord. Roman Catholics are demanding drastic changes in the Royal Ulster Constabulary, a predominantly Protestant force. As the independent police oversight commissioner, Thomas A.
NEWS
June 30, 1993 | From Associated Press
A man who said he had killed 17 prostitutes during the past two years led police to the buried remains of two women Tuesday, providing the first physical evidence to support his claim, investigators said. One source said documents apparently identifying many victims were found in the suspect's home. Joel Rifkin, an unemployed gardener, made the claim of serial killings after he was pulled over for traffic violations Monday and an officer discovered a woman's decomposed body in his pickup.
NEWS
August 9, 1997 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Colombians saw new hope for improving their embittered relations with the United States in this week's brief visit by Thomas A. Constantine, the head of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration. Yet Constantine's whistle-stop Thursday also clearly indicated that the prospect of reconciliation does not extend to President Ernesto Samper, whose 1994 election campaign has been the target of persistent accusations that it was financed in part by drug money.
NEWS
January 14, 1994 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Calling him "street-smart, tough and an able administrator," the Clinton Administration on Thursday nominated New York State Police Supt. Thomas A. Constantine to head the Drug Enforcement Administration. At a ceremony at the agency's headquarters in Virginia, Constantine, 55, said he began his career as a 20-year-old cadet living in a police barracks and worked his way up through the ranks to head the 4,800-member state police force. "I believe that people do not have to be victims of crime.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1996 | BARBARA FERRY, STATES NEWS SERVICE
Orange County Sheriff Brad Gates met here Thursday with top federal officials to plan a strategy for dealing with California's new medical marijuana law and a similar Arizona initiative approved by voters last week. Gates and other participants at the closed-door meeting, including Drug Enforcement Administration chief Thomas Constantine and Director Gen. Barry McCaffrey of the Office of National Drug Control Policy, discussed the possibilities of amending or overturning the new laws.
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