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Thomas Elfmont

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1995
A Los Angeles City Council panel said it would consider recommending that all 911 operators be bilingual. Police Capt. Thomas Elfmont, commanding officer of the Communications Division, said only one out of six operators on duty at any given time speaks Spanish. "I'm very concerned about this issue," said Councilwoman Jackie Goldberg, chairwoman of the Personnel Committee. "One out of six does not seem to me like an adequate ratio." The committee asked the Personnel Department to report in a few weeks on the recruitment of bilingual operators.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1995
A Los Angeles City Council panel said it would consider recommending that all 911 operators be bilingual. Police Capt. Thomas Elfmont, commanding officer of the Communications Division, said only one out of six operators on duty at any given time speaks Spanish. "I'm very concerned about this issue," said Councilwoman Jackie Goldberg, chairwoman of the Personnel Committee. "One out of six does not seem to me like an adequate ratio." The committee asked the Personnel Department to report in a few weeks on the recruitment of bilingual operators.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1993 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city of Los Angeles will not have to pay the legal fees of four police officers accused of the notorious ransacking of four apartments near Exposition Park in 1988, a Los Angeles Superior Court judge ruled Thursday. The decision by Judge Bruce R. Geernaert appears to close the books on the so-called Dalton Avenue raid, in which 80 police officers swarmed apartments on Dalton Avenue--leaving them a shambles of smashed windows, broken furniture and pro-police graffiti.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1993 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city of Los Angeles will not have to pay the legal fees of four police officers accused of the notorious ransacking of four apartments near Exposition Park in 1988, a Los Angeles Superior Court judge ruled Thursday. The decision by Judge Bruce R. Geernaert appears to close the books on the so-called Dalton Avenue raid, in which 80 police officers swarmed apartments on Dalton Avenue--leaving them a shambles of smashed windows, broken furniture and pro-police graffiti.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1991 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fragments of dialogue, in which a Los Angeles Police Department captain allegedly instructed his troops to "level" and make "uninhabitable" four apartment units in South-Central Los Angeles, became a point of debate Wednesday as closing arguments began in the 39th and Dalton case. "These aren't slang words, or words with more than one meaning," Deputy Dist. Atty. Christopher Darden told jurors, summing up six weeks of testimony by pointing to Capt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1990 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just days before the 39th and Dalton drug raid, a Los Angeles police captain suggested to his troops in a roll-call session that if an officer shot a gang member "it would not be a loss to the community" and LAPD "management would not view it negatively," according to an internal police report made public Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1991 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid heightened awareness of police abuse, the trial of three Los Angeles policemen accused of wrecking two duplexes in a 1988 narcotics raid began Monday with the prosecutor alleging that the officers conspired to "level those residences and make them uninhabitable." In his opening statement to jurors in the courtroom of Municipal Judge Larry Fidler, Deputy Dist. Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1991 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A defense attorney, responding to conspiracy charges against a Los Angeles Police Department supervisor, argued Thursday that Capt. Thomas Elfmont became a target in the case only after he recommended that other officers be disciplined for the ill-fated drug raid at 39th Street and Dalton Avenue. Elfmont fully cooperated with the LAPD's Internal Affairs investigators and the district attorney's office in the months after the Aug. 1, 1988, raid, attorney Barry Levin told jurors.
NEWS
November 26, 1990 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Officer Todd B. Parrick swung the red ax so wildly as he tore from room to room in the apartments near 39th Street and Dalton Avenue that his fellow LAPD officers believed he was going to hurt himself or the other policemen in his path. "He was pretty well busting the place up," recalled Officer Charles A. Wilson. "He was dangerous." Later, a shocked Capt. Thomas Elfmont, the police official who helped plan the drug raid, viewed the destruction and said he could not believe it.
NEWS
June 20, 1991 | TERRY PRISTIN and DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Three Los Angeles police officers were cleared Wednesday of criminal wrongdoing in the notorious ransacking of four apartments at 39th Street and Dalton Avenue in a 1988 drug raid. After nearly three weeks of deliberation, a Municipal Court jury returned verdicts of not guilty on five of six counts lodged against the three officers. It deadlocked 9 to 3 in favor of acquittal on the sixth count, which was subsequently dismissed.
NEWS
June 20, 1991 | TERRY PRISTIN and DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Three Los Angeles police officers were cleared Wednesday of criminal wrongdoing in the notorious ransacking of four apartments at 39th Street and Dalton Avenue in a 1988 drug raid. After nearly three weeks of deliberation, a Municipal Court jury returned verdicts of not guilty on five of six counts lodged against the three officers. It deadlocked 9 to 3 in favor of acquittal on the sixth count, which was subsequently dismissed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1991 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A defense attorney, responding to conspiracy charges against a Los Angeles Police Department supervisor, argued Thursday that Capt. Thomas Elfmont became a target in the case only after he recommended that other officers be disciplined for the ill-fated drug raid at 39th Street and Dalton Avenue. Elfmont fully cooperated with the LAPD's Internal Affairs investigators and the district attorney's office in the months after the Aug. 1, 1988, raid, attorney Barry Levin told jurors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1991 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fragments of dialogue, in which a Los Angeles Police Department captain allegedly instructed his troops to "level" and make "uninhabitable" four apartment units in South-Central Los Angeles, became a point of debate Wednesday as closing arguments began in the 39th and Dalton case. "These aren't slang words, or words with more than one meaning," Deputy Dist. Atty. Christopher Darden told jurors, summing up six weeks of testimony by pointing to Capt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1991 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid heightened awareness of police abuse, the trial of three Los Angeles policemen accused of wrecking two duplexes in a 1988 narcotics raid began Monday with the prosecutor alleging that the officers conspired to "level those residences and make them uninhabitable." In his opening statement to jurors in the courtroom of Municipal Judge Larry Fidler, Deputy Dist. Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1990 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just days before the 39th and Dalton drug raid, a Los Angeles police captain suggested to his troops in a roll-call session that if an officer shot a gang member "it would not be a loss to the community" and LAPD "management would not view it negatively," according to an internal police report made public Wednesday.
NEWS
November 26, 1990 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Officer Todd B. Parrick swung the red ax so wildly as he tore from room to room in the apartments near 39th Street and Dalton Avenue that his fellow LAPD officers believed he was going to hurt himself or the other policemen in his path. "He was pretty well busting the place up," recalled Officer Charles A. Wilson. "He was dangerous." Later, a shocked Capt. Thomas Elfmont, the police official who helped plan the drug raid, viewed the destruction and said he could not believe it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1991 | RONALD L. SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pressing for a rapid conclusion to the "39th and Dalton" trial, attorneys representing three Los Angeles police officers rested their case Thursday after only one defense witness testified. When the prosecutor, Christopher A. Darden, announced Wednesday that he was resting his case, "my feeling was he just threw in the towel," said defense lawyer Barry Levin, who represents Capt. Thomas Elfmont. By that time, Darden had called 25 witnesses.
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