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Thomas Hart Benton

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1989 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Television is at once the best and worst venue for Thomas Hart Benton. It's the best because it achieves what he always said he wanted to do: make his art available to "ordinary people." It's the worst because Benton was essentially a muralist whose figures are too large and whose canvasses of rural America too vast and busy--almost communities unto themselves--to be contained on the small screen, even with the most adroit camera work.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1990 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT
Don't breathe a word to the people of Cincinnati--you might find yourself under indictment if you do--but sex and sexuality have been central to art for at least 10,000 years, give or take a few. So let's talk about art and sex for a moment, and especially about art and the kind of sex that dares not speak its name.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
While celebrations around the world Sunday were noting the 100th anniversary of the birth of film pioneer Charlie Chaplin, folks in Missouri were marking a similar anniversary involving a native son. Thomas Hart Benton, the prolific and provocative painter whose work brought him fame but not wide acceptance by the art world's elite, received a spirited celebration in his home state. He remained a Missouri resident until his death in 1975.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1990
"Lewd, immoral, obscene . . . the lowest expression of pure filth." The above statement was made not made about a Robert Mapplethorpe or Andres Serrano exhibition in 1990 but rather in 1939 concerning Thomas Hart Benton's painting "Susanna and the Elders." (The current Los Angeles County Museum show of Benton works was reviewed by William Wilson April 29.) It has been interesting to re-read quotes from Benton and Mapplethorpe, very different artists from very different eras. It would appear both were concerned with (and condemned for)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1990
"Lewd, immoral, obscene . . . the lowest expression of pure filth." The above statement was made not made about a Robert Mapplethorpe or Andres Serrano exhibition in 1990 but rather in 1939 concerning Thomas Hart Benton's painting "Susanna and the Elders." (The current Los Angeles County Museum show of Benton works was reviewed by William Wilson April 29.) It has been interesting to re-read quotes from Benton and Mapplethorpe, very different artists from very different eras. It would appear both were concerned with (and condemned for)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1988 | MARLENA DONOHUE
L.A. artist Olga Seem takes strides toward those interpretive renditions of nature that hover somewhere between realism and abstraction, translating observation into an eccentric reality full of mystery and life force. Thomas Hart Benton was a master at this; more recently, the goofy floating interiors of Elizabeth Murray hit the same target from another angle. Seem's current show is more compact and sure than the loose and almost chaotic work of the past.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1990
The decade ended, the world seemed to crumble like a chimney falling in slow motion. The wreckage revealed grimy scraps of gilt-edged securities, broken bottles of bathtub gin, the fender of a yellow Stutz Bearcat--detritus of good times gone. Bony derelicts would soon rummage in the rubble to a harmonica tune asking, "Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1990 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT
Don't breathe a word to the people of Cincinnati--you might find yourself under indictment if you do--but sex and sexuality have been central to art for at least 10,000 years, give or take a few. So let's talk about art and sex for a moment, and especially about art and the kind of sex that dares not speak its name.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2009 | Scott Timberg
The documentary filmmaker Ken Burns has a story he clearly loves to tell. He was walking in New York City a few years ago -- on a date -- when he heard a man he'd just passed yell violently back at him: "What about Mingus?!" Preceding the name of the protean jazz bassist was a pungent (and unprintable) expletive. Burns turned to his date and reassured her. "It's just about 'Jazz,' " he said, referring to his 10-part history shown on PBS in 2001, which drew big audiences and critics' complaints that he overlooked key figures.
NEWS
January 19, 1993
John D. Paulus Jr., 83, an architect who worked on the Manhattan Project, which developed the first atomic bomb. Paulus joined the Raytheon Co. in Concord, Mass., in 1942 and wound up overseeing a group of engineers, drafters and designers working on an electrical guidance system. He also worked on the conceptual design for what was to be the first radar tracking system. He had lived in the Jefferson City, Mo., area since 1946 and worked for Missouri state government until 1974.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1990
The decade ended, the world seemed to crumble like a chimney falling in slow motion. The wreckage revealed grimy scraps of gilt-edged securities, broken bottles of bathtub gin, the fender of a yellow Stutz Bearcat--detritus of good times gone. Bony derelicts would soon rummage in the rubble to a harmonica tune asking, "Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1989 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Television is at once the best and worst venue for Thomas Hart Benton. It's the best because it achieves what he always said he wanted to do: make his art available to "ordinary people." It's the worst because Benton was essentially a muralist whose figures are too large and whose canvasses of rural America too vast and busy--almost communities unto themselves--to be contained on the small screen, even with the most adroit camera work.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
While celebrations around the world Sunday were noting the 100th anniversary of the birth of film pioneer Charlie Chaplin, folks in Missouri were marking a similar anniversary involving a native son. Thomas Hart Benton, the prolific and provocative painter whose work brought him fame but not wide acceptance by the art world's elite, received a spirited celebration in his home state. He remained a Missouri resident until his death in 1975.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1988 | MARLENA DONOHUE
L.A. artist Olga Seem takes strides toward those interpretive renditions of nature that hover somewhere between realism and abstraction, translating observation into an eccentric reality full of mystery and life force. Thomas Hart Benton was a master at this; more recently, the goofy floating interiors of Elizabeth Murray hit the same target from another angle. Seem's current show is more compact and sure than the loose and almost chaotic work of the past.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1989 | SUVAN GEER
This exhibition of works by Georgia O'Keeffe and her contemporaries is notable more for the illustriousness of the names than the paintings and drawings. Even O'Keeffe is poorly represented. Noteworthy, however, are her stunning charcoal drawing of a bulging "Banana Flower" done in 1934 and several of Marsden Hartley's paintings. Actually it is Hartley who shines in this grouping of such luminaries as Arthur Dove, Thomas Hart Benton and Joseph Stella.
NEWS
April 15, 1992
Herman Cherry, 83, an abstract painter whose Expressionist canvases were known on both coasts. Raised in Philadelphia where he studied art, Cherry moved to Los Angeles with his family when still in his teens and worked for 20th Century Fox helping to design sets. He studied in Europe and then New York City with Thomas Hart Benton before returning to Los Angeles and establishing a gallery where he staged his first solo show in 1934.
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