Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsThomas J Stonewall Jackson
IN THE NEWS

Thomas J Stonewall Jackson

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2003 | Robert W. Welkos, Times Staff Writer
His military feats during the early years of the Civil War have elevated him to almost mythical proportions. He was adored by his troops, he was feared and admired by his foes, and he is still considered an icon in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia, where his body is laid to rest. Yet as far as Hollywood is concerned, Gen. Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson has been a forgotten man.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2003 | Robert W. Welkos, Times Staff Writer
His military feats during the early years of the Civil War have elevated him to almost mythical proportions. He was adored by his troops, he was feared and admired by his foes, and he is still considered an icon in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia, where his body is laid to rest. Yet as far as Hollywood is concerned, Gen. Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson has been a forgotten man.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 22, 1991
Julia Jackson Christian Preston, 104, granddaughter of Confederate Gen. Thomas J. (Stonewall) Jackson. At age 4 in 1891, she and her brother unveiled a statue in Lexington, Va., of their grandfather, who defeated Union soldiers at Bull Run and in other battles before he was killed in the Battle of Chancellorsville in 1863. Mrs. Preston organized a Red Cross chapter in High Point, N.C., and wrote humorous essays, several of which were published.
NEWS
November 23, 1986 | United Press International
An unknown Confederate soldier, killed during a skirmish in Virginia in 1862, was awarded South Carolina's highest honor Saturday and buried in his home state. A horse-drawn wagon carried the soldier's coffin, draped with a Confederate battle flag, from the Statehouse, down Main Street to a cemetery where other unknown soldiers of the Civil War are buried. In a ceremony on the Statehouse steps, Lt. Gov.
NEWS
February 3, 1991 | HARRY G. SUMMERS Jr.
There are fears that at least some of the 11 U.S. Marines killed in action in the fighting along the Kuwaiti-Saudi Arabian border last week and another Marine in a convoy may have been struck down by friendly fire. While it will not be known for sure until the battle has been thoroughly investigated, the sad truth is that such incidents are not unusual on the battlefield. In the Civil War, for example, one of the South's most famous generals, Thomas J.
NEWS
January 9, 2000 | MATTHEW MOSK, WASHINGTON POST
At the wheel of his German luxury sedan, William F. Chaney cuts off the main road through Sharpsburg, Md., and makes his assault up a grassy hill near the spot where the Battle of Antietam began. Over to the left, he says, extending his arm out the window, is the sunken road that had earned the name Bloody Lane when the fighting stopped.
NEWS
March 28, 1988 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, Times Staff Writer
They're calling it the third great battle of Manassas. It was here, in the rolling hills and open fields overlooking Bull Run creek, that 35,000 cocksure Union troops were routed in July, 1861, by a surprisingly strong Confederate force in the first battle of the Civil War. A year later, Confederate Gen. Thomas J. (Stonewall) Jackson reputedly earned his nickname in another major clash on the site.
NEWS
January 14, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lawrence Douglas Wilder, the grandson of slaves, stood here Saturday in the one-time capital of the Confederacy and took the oath of office as governor of Virginia--the first elected black governor in U.S. history. Bracing against a bright winter chill, Wilder, 58, a Democrat and one-time Richmond lawyer who served a term as lieutenant governor before winning the state's highest office last November, conceded during his inauguration speech that it was a moment to savor.
NEWS
June 27, 1996 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ending the reign of single-sex public colleges, the Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that the admissions policy is unconstitutional at the nation's last state college whose doors were closed to women. On a 7-1 vote, the justices said that Virginia Military Institute must admit qualified women and made clear that public schools can separate students based on gender only if there are "exceedingly persuasive" reasons for doing so.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2000 | CECILIA RASMUSSEN
John Brown's body lies a-moldering in the grave, John Brown's body lies a-moldering in the grave, John Brown's body lies a-moldering in the grave, But his soul goes marching on. --Author unknown * Wherever John Brown's soul may be, his son's body lies on an Altadena hilltop named for what may have been the most critical battle in the bloody Civil War that followed his father's storied death.
TRAVEL
August 16, 1987 | SAM TEAFORD, Teaford is an editor on The Times ' foreign desk.
A family reunion as a great vacation? Compared to Maui or Mazatlan? Compared to three nights in Oxnard? Typically, a family reunion means a trip back to the old hometown, to see uncles and cousins you haven't seen since last year--while the spouse is complaining: "Why do we have to spend our vacations visiting your relatives? Why can't we go someplace interesting for a change?" But this was not an ordinary family reunion.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|