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Thomas L Ashley

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NEWS
December 21, 1988 | TOM REDBURN, Times Staff Writer
Advisers to President-elect George Bush are considering a budget strategy in which Bush would warn Congress soon after taking office that he is willing to swallow automatic, indiscriminate spending cuts under the Gramm-Rudman budget law rather than tolerate a tax hike. That strategy, according to aides and congressional sources, would erase the widespread belief that Bush will back away from his campaign pledge not to increase taxes.
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NEWS
December 21, 1988 | TOM REDBURN, Times Staff Writer
Advisers to President-elect George Bush are considering a budget strategy in which Bush would warn Congress soon after taking office that he is willing to swallow automatic, indiscriminate spending cuts under the Gramm-Rudman budget law rather than tolerate a tax hike. That strategy, according to aides and congressional sources, would erase the widespread belief that Bush will back away from his campaign pledge not to increase taxes.
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NEWS
December 20, 1988 | Associated Press
President-elect George Bush, vowing anew not to raise taxes, predicted today that interest rates will decline once he is able to convince world markets that his Administration is serious about shrinking the budget deficit. "I intend to hold the line on taxes," Bush said. "There are a lot of people around saying I can't do that." Bush also selected former Nevada Sen. Paul Laxalt, a Republican, and former Ohio Rep. Thomas L.
BUSINESS
January 30, 1991 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The director of the Congressional Budget Office bluntly warned Tuesday that the bank insurance fund will run out of money late this year and will need to borrow cash from the Treasury if it is to continue rescuing depositors in financially crippled banks. But CBO director Robert D. Reischauer said the banking industry, which supports the fund with annual premiums, should be able to repay such borrowing over the next five years, making a direct taxpayer bailout unnecessary.
BUSINESS
March 2, 1989 | TOM REDBURN, Times Staff Writer
Once touted as the best hope for forging a solution to the federal budget deficit, the National Economic Commission went out of business as scheduled Wednesday not with a bang but with a whimper. The 14-member bipartisan panel, established by Congress after the October, 1987, stock market crash to advise whoever was elected President in 1988, broke up in disarray with two separate reports that mirrored the longstanding split between Republicans and Democrats over the issue.
NEWS
December 17, 1988 | CATHLEEN DECKER and DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writers
Ending a lengthy and presumably humiliating delay, President-elect George Bush selected former Texas Sen. John Tower as his secretary of defense Friday, and both men immediately pledged to pare military spending and to reform the tangled defense procurement process. Other transition appointments, including that of Rep. Jack Kemp as secretary of housing and urban development, are expected as early as Monday. Transition sources said Thursday that Kemp had accepted the job after meeting with Bush.
NEWS
April 24, 1988 | PAUL HOUSTON, Times Staff Writer
For former Rep. Gene Snyder (R-Ky.), retirement from Congress meant anything but financial hardship. Within months of leaving the House in 1986, he was back in his old haunts, earning $90,000 by lobbying former colleagues against banning radar detectors in automobiles and trucks. The former top-ranking Republican on the House Public Works and Transportation Committee takes credit for keeping the provision off a bill that raised the speed limit on rural interstates to 65 m.p.h.
NEWS
January 20, 1993 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was the boxes that startled Ronald and Nancy Reagan when they stepped into their new home in Bel-Air on Jan. 20, 1989. Boxes in the kitchen. Boxes in the bedroom. Boxes at every turn. So many boxes that a week later private citizen Reagan complained of a sore back from the unaccustomed bending and lifting. Life in the White House had been nothing like this. Today George Bush faces a similar return to reality.
NEWS
February 15, 1989 | PAUL HOUSTON, Times Staff Writer
When it comes to accepting campaign money from groups representing financial institutions, Rep. David Dreier (R-La Verne), a member of the House Banking, Finance and Urban Affairs Committee, wants to be fair. So he gives the green light to everybody--banks, savings and loans, credit unions and others.
BUSINESS
February 15, 1989 | PAUL HOUSTON, Times Staff Writer
When it comes to accepting campaign money from groups representing financial institutions, Rep. David Dreier (R-La Verne), a member of the House Banking, Finance and Urban Affairs Committee, wants to be fair. So he gives the green light to everybody--banks, savings and loans, credit unions and others.
NEWS
May 19, 1988 | RUDY ABRAMSON, Times Staff Writer
In the jumbled, faded offices where the stoop-work of the Bush for President campaign goes forward in a maze of posters, coffee cups and rented furniture, they are known as The Adults. They are the Big Three, the vice president's early disciples, men whose friendships span Bush's varied political incarnations and who have prospered with him: a pinstriped executive from Wall Street, an oilman from Texas and the incumbent secretary of the U.S. Treasury.
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