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March 12, 2004 | Gordon Cox, Newsday
"Young Frankenstein," the next Mel Brooks musical, is coming along nicely, but its creators still aren't sure when the public can expect to see it on Broadway. "We've got Act 1 done, and we've written about 10 songs," reports Thomas Meehan, the Tony-winning book writer who also collaborated with Brooks on "The Producers." He and Brooks expect to return to the project in May but have no firm timeline for the production. "We've always felt we'd just keep working on it until we finish it," he said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2004 | Patrick Pacheco, Special to The Times
Long before David Letterman's "Oprah, Uma" gag at the 1995 Oscars, there was Tom Meehan's "Oona, Yma." In 1962, the then-New Yorker writer wrote a comic essay about a dream in which he is hosting a party for the famed Peruvian vocalist Yma Sumac. Because Sumac finds surnames too formal, he soon finds himself in a roundelay of escalating silliness as guests, including Ava Gardner, Abba Eban and Oona O'Neill, pour through the door: "Oona, Yma"; "Oona, Ava"; "Oona, Abba."
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2004 | Patrick Pacheco, Special to The Times
Long before David Letterman's "Oprah, Uma" gag at the 1995 Oscars, there was Tom Meehan's "Oona, Yma." In 1962, the then-New Yorker writer wrote a comic essay about a dream in which he is hosting a party for the famed Peruvian vocalist Yma Sumac. Because Sumac finds surnames too formal, he soon finds himself in a roundelay of escalating silliness as guests, including Ava Gardner, Abba Eban and Oona O'Neill, pour through the door: "Oona, Yma"; "Oona, Ava"; "Oona, Abba."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2004 | Gordon Cox, Newsday
"Young Frankenstein," the next Mel Brooks musical, is coming along nicely, but its creators still aren't sure when the public can expect to see it on Broadway. "We've got Act 1 done, and we've written about 10 songs," reports Thomas Meehan, the Tony-winning book writer who also collaborated with Brooks on "The Producers." He and Brooks expect to return to the project in May but have no firm timeline for the production. "We've always felt we'd just keep working on it until we finish it," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2007 | From Playbill.com
Rocky Balboa sings. Playbill reports that a musical version of the 1976 Sylvester Stallone hit film "Rocky" is being developed for stage with book by Tony Award winner Thomas Meehan ("Annie," "The Producers," "Young Frankenstein"). "It was made to be a musical," Meehan says on the magazine's website. "It's got all the elements."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2008 | Lynne Heffley
"Cry-Baby," the musical based on John Waters' film spoof of teen life in 1950s Baltimore, will cut short its Broadway run on Sunday after 45 previews and 68 performances. The musical -- with songs by David Javerbaum and Adam Schlesinger and book by Mark O'Donnell and Thomas Meehan -- was shut out at the Tony Awards after receiving four nominations, including best musical. It premiered at the La Jolla Playhouse in 2007, then opened at New York's Marquis Theatre on April 24 to unenthusiastic reviews and disappointing box office.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2007 | Lee Margulies
Megan Mullally, an Emmy winner for "Will & Grace," will join Tony winners Roger Bart, Sutton Foster and Shuler Hensley in Mel Brooks' musical adaptation of his 1974 film "Young Frankenstein," the producers said Thursday. The stage show opens in Seattle Aug.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1997
Re the source of David Letterman's "Uma, Oprah" routine (Letters, Aug. 24): It all began in the comic mind of Thomas Meehan, who conceived a totally off-the-wall 1962 article for the New Yorker magazine entitled "Yma Dream," based on the premise of his having a recurring dream that he is giving a cocktail party in honor of singer Yma Sumac and as the celebrity guests begin to arrive he has to introduce them to each other: "Oona, Yma; Oona, Ava; Oona,...
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2003
Book of a musical "Hairspray" Mark O'Donnell and Thomas Meehan * Original score "Hairspray" Music by Marc Shaiman, lyrics by Scott Wittman and Marc Shaiman * Revival, play "Long Day's Journey Into Night" * Revival, musical "Nine" * Special theatrical event "Russell Simmons' Def Poetry Jam on Broadway" * Featured actor, play Denis O'Hare "Take Me Out" * Featured actress, play Michele Pawk "Hollywood Arms" * Featured actor, musical Dick Latessa "Hairspray" * Featured actress, musical Jane
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2011 | By Karen Wada, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When he was a kid in the 1960s, Jerry Mitchell visited the Hollywood Bowl for the first time. "We got to walk on the stage," he recalls. "I looked out and said, 'This is amazing. This is what I want to do.'" Mitchell is back at the Bowl, where he will direct and choreograph a new version of "Hairspray," the Broadway hit based on John Waters' film about an effervescent teen who uses a TV dance program to battle segregation in '60s Baltimore. The show, which runs Friday through Sunday, stars Harvey Fierstein and Marissa Jaret Winokur — re-creating their Tony-winning roles as Edna Turnblad and her daughter, Tracy — plus Susan Anton, Corbin Bleu, Drew Carey, Nick Jonas, Darlene Love and John Stamos.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2012 | By David Ng
Mark O'Donnell, a stage and comedy writer who won a Tony Award for his musical adaptation of the John Waters movie "Hairspray," has died at 58. He collapsed Monday in the lobby of his apartment building on New York's Upper West Side, according to the Associated Press. O'Donnell co-wrote the book for "Hairspray" with Thomas Meehan. The musical proved to be an enormous popular success when it opened on Broadway in 2002, and it played for nearly seven years. It also became a hit touring show and was produced last summer at the Hollywood Bowl.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2012 | By Jamie Wetherbe
A Los Angeles native has landed the title role in a new Broadway production of "Annie" opening this fall. After a nine-month, multi-city search and more than 5,000 auditions, producers chose curly haired Lilla Crawford to play the adorable orphan. Crawford is already a Broadway veteran: She made her debut last year playing Debbie in the closing cast of" Billy Elliot"and has performed more than a dozen shows with Youth Academy of Dramatic Arts in Los Angeles. Annie -- which features music by Charles Strouse, lyrics by Martin Charnin and book by Thomas Meehan -- will be directed and choreographed by Tony-winners James Lapine and Andy Blankenbuehler, respectively.  Based on the 1920s comic strip “Little Orphan Annie” by Harold Gray, “Annie” made its Broadway debut in 1977 and ran for six years a fueled by a soundtrack that included "Maybe," "It's The Hard Knock Life" and "Tomorrow.
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