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Thomas S Foley

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October 8, 1990 | RONALD J. OSTROW and PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
He stands out among the 435 members of the House of Representatives--a brainy, undeniably decent man who is liked by almost everyone, Republicans and Democrats alike. Yet Rep. Thomas S. Foley (D-Wash.), after 16 months as Speaker of the House, is facing the most serious political test of his career. The stunning defeat of the bipartisan accord on budget deficit reduction last week has placed Foley on the firing line and raised a new question in the capital: Can this man really lead?
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NEWS
November 7, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Former House Speaker Thomas S. Foley was sworn in as ambassador to Japan in a private State Department ceremony attended by Secretary of State Madeleine Albright. The U.S. Embassy in Tokyo has been without an ambassador since the departure last December of the previous envoy, former Vice President Walter F. Mondale.
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NEWS
November 7, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Former House Speaker Thomas S. Foley was sworn in as ambassador to Japan in a private State Department ceremony attended by Secretary of State Madeleine Albright. The U.S. Embassy in Tokyo has been without an ambassador since the departure last December of the previous envoy, former Vice President Walter F. Mondale.
NEWS
August 30, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
President Clinton on Friday made his long-anticipated nomination of former House Speaker Thomas S. Foley (D-Wash.) to be ambassador to Japan. Former State Department spokesman R. Nicholas Burns was tapped to be ambassador to Greece. If confirmed by the Senate, Foley would replace former Vice President Walter F. Mondale in Tokyo. Mondale left in December, and the critical diplomatic post is vacant.
NEWS
August 10, 1992 | From The Times' Washington staff
FOLEY UPDATE: The fate of House Speaker Thomas S. Foley (D-Wash.) seems to rise and fall with the Democrats' hopes for victory in the fall. . . . Several groups of dissident House members were meeting secretly to plot his ouster as Speaker, numbering among their complaints a general lack of political leadership and his failure to head off the House bank and post office scandals.
BUSINESS
July 24, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Foley Prods Committees for Action on Bank Bill: House Speaker Thomas S. Foley (D-Wash.) set a deadline of Sept. 27 for committee action on comprehensive legislation overhauling the banking system and replenishing the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. The bill cleared the House Banking Committee, 31-20, on June 28, and Foley's referral of the measure to four other panels virtually guarantees that Congress will be debating it as the FDIC nears the brink of insolvency. FDIC Chairman L.
NEWS
January 24, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The most powerful member of the House of Representatives added his voice to the drive to unseal the files on the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. House Speaker Thomas S. Foley (D-Wash.) joined colleagues urging legislation to unseal House files, seeking answers to questions about the 1963 assassination. The files of the House Select Committee on Assassinations were to have remained sealed until 2029.
NEWS
January 27, 1992 | By Times staff writers
RATINGS GAME: Leaders of Congress can add one more burden to their current woes: a sharp drop in their job ratings by senior congressional aides. Senate Majority Leader George J. Mitchell of Maine and Senate Minority Leader Bob Dole of Kansas tied in the poll, with 42% of the staffers rating each of them excellent or very good. But that figure represented a big drop from their 1991 numbers, when 67% rated Mitchell an excellent or very good leader and 59% gave Dole that rating.
NEWS
July 11, 1989
House Speaker Thomas S. Foley (D-Wash.) said that President Bush's proposals to raise pay for judges and top executive branch officials cannot win approval without a link to higher pay for members of Congress. Foley said he prefers there to be no connection, but he suggested his view is not widely shared on Capitol Hill. The Speaker commented at a luncheon with executives and reporters of The Associated Press.
NEWS
September 24, 1994 | Reuters
House Speaker Thomas S. Foley (D-Wash.) trails his Republican challenger by 19 percentage points with less than seven weeks before the Nov. 8 congressional elections, according to a new opinion poll. George Nethercutt, an attorney and former chairman of the Spokane County Republican Party, is favored by 58% of voters, compared to 39% for Foley, said the survey conducted for KHQ-TV of Spokane.
NEWS
November 10, 1994 | JOHN BALZAR and DOUG CONNER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As the ink dries on this page of history, the story winds up with an exclamation point. Thomas S. Foley concedes his seat. The Democratic Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, only two heartbeats away from the presidency, came undone by a power greater than his: a scattered thousand or so swing voters who gambled their ballots on change.
NEWS
November 9, 1994 | MELISSA HEALY and DOUG CONNER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Voters in eastern Washington appeared poised to hand Republicans a prize trophy late Tuesday by toppling Democratic House Speaker Thomas S. Foley and electing his Republican challenger, 50-year-old George Nethercutt. Foley's apparent defeat marked the first time since 1862, when Pennsylvanians voted out Galusha Grow, that a House Speaker has been ousted from the job by voters in his own district.
NEWS
October 18, 1994 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is a keen appreciation for political power here on the remote eastern border of the state of Washington, a landscape of arid farmlands and piney foothills. For years, people in these parts enjoyed more than their share of it. But what is power compared to change, they now ask themselves. So here is Democratic Rep. Thomas S. Foley--30 years in Congress, Speaker of the House, second in line to succeed the President--battling for his political survival the only way he knows how.
NEWS
September 24, 1994 | Reuters
House Speaker Thomas S. Foley (D-Wash.) trails his Republican challenger by 19 percentage points with less than seven weeks before the Nov. 8 congressional elections, according to a new opinion poll. George Nethercutt, an attorney and former chairman of the Spokane County Republican Party, is favored by 58% of voters, compared to 39% for Foley, said the survey conducted for KHQ-TV of Spokane.
NEWS
August 24, 1994 | KAREN TUMULTY and EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a major concession that could alter the most fundamental elements of the health debate, House Speaker Thomas S. Foley (D-Wash.) indicated Tuesday that he would settle for a limited package of insurance reforms this year and put off more ambitious efforts for another day.
NEWS
July 27, 1994 | KAREN TUMULTY and EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Seeking compromise on the most controversial element of President Clinton's health care plan, House Speaker Thomas S. Foley (D-Wash.) said Tuesday that he will not insist on employers paying 80% of workers' insurance premiums and instead is considering setting business contributions at 50%. Foley's comments came as Senate Majority Leader George J. Mitchell (D-Me.) also was exploring whether lowering the contribution to 50% might win some badly needed votes on his side of the Capitol.
NEWS
November 2, 1991 | From Associated Press
House Speaker Thomas S. Foley (D-Wash.) on Friday blasted a term-limitation initiative that could cut short his political career and rejected suggestions that his own reputation is at stake. Foley said proponents of Initiative 553, on Tuesday's ballot in his home state, were pushing term limits for elected officials by waging "a campaign of disinformation."
NEWS
January 24, 1994 | from Associated Press
Overhaul of the nation's health care system, including coverage for everyone, remains the goal this year despite Republican rumblings that it is not as important as crime and welfare reform, Democratic congressional leaders said Sunday. "We do have to act on health care reform," said Senate Majority Leader George J. Mitchell (D-Me.), who said health care and welfare reform can be passed this year.
NEWS
October 23, 1993 | KAREN TUMULTY and WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When Thomas S. Foley came to Congress in 1964, a House baron offered the freshman Washington lawmaker some rules of survival: give unquestioning loyalty to his committee chairman, be strictly obedient to the Democratic majority leader and--most important of all--"pray God, trust and follow the Speaker." Nearly three decades later, Speaker Foley (D-Wash.
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