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Thomas W Lynch

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2006 | Kate Aurthur, Times Staff Writer
IN his television credits, he's Thomas W. Lynch, but in person, he's all Tommy. "Everything is called the Tommy bubble -- and Tommy town is where I live!" the writer-producer said recently when describing his creative process, practically shouting with enthusiasm over lunch at the Standard Hotel downtown. Lynch is an irrepressible 50-year-old, born and raised in West Hollywood, who likes to talk about being Irish Catholic, hating George W. Bush and loving Alec Baldwin ("He's a god, right?
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2006 | Kate Aurthur, Times Staff Writer
IN his television credits, he's Thomas W. Lynch, but in person, he's all Tommy. "Everything is called the Tommy bubble -- and Tommy town is where I live!" the writer-producer said recently when describing his creative process, practically shouting with enthusiasm over lunch at the Standard Hotel downtown. Lynch is an irrepressible 50-year-old, born and raised in West Hollywood, who likes to talk about being Irish Catholic, hating George W. Bush and loving Alec Baldwin ("He's a god, right?
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2011 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
The most, and almost the only, surprising thing about "Bucket & Skinner's Epic Adventures," a new tweencom debuting Friday on Nickelodeon before taking up its regular Sunday post, is that the character called Skinner is the one you'd expect, given a certain emptiness of head, to be called Bucket. Nickelodeon has been in its time a place where marvelous, strange and poetic things have happened — yes, "The Adventures of Pete & Pete," I'm talking to you, but also to "Ned's Declassified School Survival Guide" and "The Secret World of Alex Mack," the last of which was co-created by Thomas W. Lynch, who developed "Bucket & Skinner.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2000 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you can get past the stay-away title of the year, "Smiling Fish and Goat on Fire," you'll find an endearing little picture hiding behind it. Chris (Derick Martini) and Tony (Steve Martini) are mid-to-late-twentysomething brothers, who have recently lost their parents in a freeway crash, and for now are living in the old L.A. Craftsman cottage in which they grew up.
BUSINESS
July 22, 1998 | MICHAEL P. LUCAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Peppy new technology is rapidly changing the look of television and expanding markets for companies involved in visual effects production, bringing artists in the field gratifying assignments--and a few they didn't quite anticipate. Emmy Award-winning effects supervisor Ron Thornton said his best work last year was creating a computer-animated, 9-foot-tall, three-legged alien for UPN network's "Star Trek: Voyager."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1999 | MICHAEL P. LUCAS, Michael P. Lucas is a Times staff writer who often writes about children's programming
Nine-year-old Mia Savagian of Redondo Beach stuck out her tongue at a two-way mirror in Nickelodeon's Santa Monica test-viewer lab one recent evening, then beamed when she was handed a $50 check for what amounts to jury duty in a court of popular culture, where verdicts hold sway over what kind of shows America's kids will eventually get to watch on television.
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