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NEWS
November 10, 1993 | From Times Wire Services
A school became a war zone filled with the screams and broken bodies of children Tuesday in the deadliest attack in Sarajevo in nearly a month. Bosnian Radio quoted Prime Minister Haris Silajdzic as saying nine children died in the mortar attack. But early accounts had said that at least seven people, including three to four children and one teacher, were killed when mortar rounds exploded near the school entrance.
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NEWS
August 19, 1994 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As senior ministers from NATO's 16 member nations gather here today at a commemorative service for the alliance's late secretary general, Manfred Woerner, they will start to address the crucial issue of succession. Although Woerner, who died here Saturday, had been fighting a losing battle against cancer for more than two years, there has been little thought given to a successor.
NEWS
January 28, 1994 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The troubled U.N. mission in the former Yugoslav republics disclosed Thursday that it has dismissed 23 soldiers and seven civilians for corruption following an investigation into allegations of widespread criminal activity in its ranks. But Austrian Gen. Guenther Greindl, who conducted the internal probe of one of the largest and most expensive U.N. peacekeeping forces in history, brushed off the most serious accusations as unfounded or lacking enough evidence to prosecute.
NEWS
November 12, 1995 | LAURA SILBER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"I constantly dream of Osijek," Dragan Car said Saturday, but the Croatian Serb doubted he will ever return to the hometown he fled four years ago after war engulfed Eastern Slavonia, a patch of land that borders the rump Yugoslavia. And as international envoys struggle to resolve the status of this last bit of Serb-held land in Croatia, Car wondered whether he is destined to become embroiled in fighting once again.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1994
Bosnia is starving. On Tuesday, the United Nations confirmed numbers reported by Bosnian Prime Minister Haris Silajdzic: During December, people in Bosnian-controlled territory got about 5.5 pounds of U.N.-delivered food each. In Serb-controlled territory in Bosnia, people got more than nine pounds. In Croat-controlled territory, 21 pounds. A U.N. official attributed the discrepancy to Serbian and Croatian military superiority: U.N.
NEWS
September 1, 1993 | From Times Wire Services
Bosnia's Muslim-led government and rebel Serbs agreed Tuesday on a new cease-fire as year-old negotiations to end the brutal war by splitting the country reached a decisive phase. Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic and Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic, meanwhile, said they expected Bosnian President Alija Izetbegovic to accept a plan to split Bosnia-Herzegovina into three ethnic republics today. "The conference continues . . .
NEWS
September 20, 1993 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While the president of Bosnia-Herzegovina pondered an unwanted partitioning of his country as the price for peace, international mediators scrambled Sunday to salvage a pact they hope will bring an end to the deadly conflict. A cease-fire that was widely ignored across Bosnia when it went into effect Saturday appeared to take hold belatedly, suggesting some commitment on the part of government and rebel forces to give the latest armistice drive a chance. U.N.
NEWS
December 15, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
The U.S. decision to open a dialogue with the PLO was hailed today in the Arab world and beyond as a step that would advance peace in the Middle East. Some Palestinian refugees wept for joy at the news. In Washington, congressional leaders sounded a chorus of optimism but urged members of the Palestine Liberation Organization to match their words with action. The Soviet Union, Britain, Italy and Japan were among nations joining Arab states in expressing pleasure at the U.S.
NEWS
January 14, 1994 | From Associated Press
Johan Jorgen Holst, the Norwegian foreign minister who led secret talks that forged the Israel-PLO peace accord and who pledged to pursue peace "as long as there is life in me," died Thursday after a stroke. Holst, 56, was discovered dead in his hospital bed after suffering his second stroke in two months. He had been foreign minister for less than 10 months.
NEWS
April 8, 1993 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.N. Security Council, trying to ease its way past hatreds that date more than two millennia to the conquering days of Alexander the Great, finally approved membership in the United Nations for the little republic of Macedonia on Wednesday but under a temporary name and a flag that will not fly in front of U.N. headquarters.
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