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BUSINESS
January 27, 2010 | By Hugo Martín
After nearly 19 months away from the spotlight, a new King Kong -- more grizzled and, definitely, ferocious -- is preparing to return to Universal Studios Hollywood. Since the old animatronic Kong was destroyed in a fire on the theme park's back lot, Hollywood's top visual effects wizards have been tinkering away in a giant hangar in Playa Vista to create a new, more realistic ape to terrify visitors who take the park's signature back lot studio tour. Inside the humongous drab-green building, Academy Award-winning director Peter Jackson has led a team of film and theme park ride experts in creating a 3-D version of the hairy ape to replace the Kong that died in the June 2008 fire.
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BUSINESS
February 6, 2010 | By Richard Verrier
Lifting a roadblock limiting the availability of 3-D movies at the local multiplex, banking giant JP Morgan Chase & Co. has raised nearly $700 million on behalf of a group of the country's largest theater operators, a move many in Hollywood hope will win over a new generation of filmgoers who enjoy an increasing array of options for entertainment. The financing, delayed for more than a year because of the financial crisis and the tightening of credit markets, will speed the rollout of 3-D movies to the country's movie screens as Hollywood races to capitalize on the success of such blockbusters as "Avatar" and "Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs."
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2006 | Geoff Boucher, Times Staff Writer
Bryan Singer was gushing about some in-your-face Smallville corn. "Look at that! Oh, look at the corn." The director of "Superman Returns," wearing plastic 3-D glasses, was sitting in an empty Imax theater at Universal City a few days ago where he saw his own movie in an unexpected way.
BUSINESS
January 27, 2010 | By Hugo Martín
After nearly 19 months away from the spotlight, a new King Kong -- more grizzled and, definitely, ferocious -- is preparing to return to Universal Studios Hollywood. Since the old animatronic Kong was destroyed in a fire on the theme park's back lot, Hollywood's top visual effects wizards have been tinkering away in a giant hangar in Playa Vista to create a new, more realistic ape to terrify visitors who take the park's signature back lot studio tour. Inside the humongous drab-green building, Academy Award-winning director Peter Jackson has led a team of film and theme park ride experts in creating a 3-D version of the hairy ape to replace the Kong that died in the June 2008 fire.
BUSINESS
February 6, 2010 | By Richard Verrier
Lifting a roadblock limiting the availability of 3-D movies at the local multiplex, banking giant JP Morgan Chase & Co. has raised nearly $700 million on behalf of a group of the country's largest theater operators, a move many in Hollywood hope will win over a new generation of filmgoers who enjoy an increasing array of options for entertainment. The financing, delayed for more than a year because of the financial crisis and the tightening of credit markets, will speed the rollout of 3-D movies to the country's movie screens as Hollywood races to capitalize on the success of such blockbusters as "Avatar" and "Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2009 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
Apparently, size does matter. As you may remember, comedian and "Parks and Recreation" costar Aziz Ansari recently caused a huge flap when he put up an outraged post on his blog excoriating Imax after he went to see "Star Trek" in Burbank -- and discovered that the supposedly giant Imax screen was barely any bigger than an average-size theater screen. Feeling ripped off (after all, he'd paid an extra $5), he blasted Imax for "duping" its customers and "whoring out their brand name."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2007 | John Horn
He's already played the Grinch, and now Jim Carrey is out to ruin Christmas all over again, this time playing Ebenezer Scrooge. Walt Disney Pictures announced Friday that Carrey will play the lead role in the computer-animated, 3-D retelling of "A Christmas Carol," to be directed by Robert Zemeckis. And because Carrey is Carrey, he'll play Scrooge at different ages as well as the ghosts of Christmas past, present and future that haunt Ebenezer and make him rethink his misguided ways.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2007 | From a Times staff writer
Academy Award-winning director James Cameron will partner with Interscope Geffen A&M Records (home of Dr. Dre, Eminem, U2, Gwen Stefani, 50 Cent, the Pussycat Dolls and many others) to produce 3-D presentations of music videos, concerts, commercials and stage musicals using the Fusion digital stereo camera system developed by Cameron with Vincent Pace.
BUSINESS
June 2, 1998 | BARBARA MURPHY
Synthonics Inc. in Westlake Village, developer of 3-D Rapid Virtual Reality, has been awarded a patent that includes processes that will be used to transmit 3-D color images across television airwaves. This is the third patent approved for Synthonics in less than a year, and company officials said it arrived just in time for the advent of high-definition television.
BUSINESS
February 17, 1998 | BARBARA MURPHY
Synthonics Technologies in Westlake Village has reached an agreement with the Smithsonian Institution and Centro Alameda, a San Antonio organization devoted to promoting Hispanic culture, to create 3-D digital replicas of historic artifacts that can be displayed or used for research.
BUSINESS
January 7, 2010 | By David Colker and Dawn C. Chmielewski
To sum up Wednesday at the giant Consumer Electronics Show, you need just one number and three letters: 3-D TV. The major consumer electronics manufacturers, which each hosted carefully rehearsed dog and pony shows for thousands of journalists gathered from all over the world, did it this year with dark glasses and promises that the world would welcome 3-D into its living room. No matter that the technology is almost entirely untried on home consumers. Except for a few cheesy experiments, television programming has been physically flat all these decades.
BUSINESS
December 18, 2009 | By David Colker
Three-dimensional television took a big step forward Thursday with the finalization of a standard for Blu-ray disc machines. The Blu-ray Disc Assn. announced it had reached agreement on the long-awaited standard that allows for full 1080p viewing of 3-D movies on TVs. Blu-ray disc players that use the standard will be delivering two images, each in full resolution, to create the effect. Details on the first Blu-ray machines equipped for full-on 3-D are expected at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas in January and then be available later in the year.
SPORTS
August 24, 2009 | Diane Pucin
ESPN is expected to announce today that the Sept. 12 USC at Ohio State football game will have a limited showing in 3-D. The 3-D version will be available at the Galen Center in Los Angeles and the ESPN Zone at LA Live as well as at a single theater in Columbus, Ohio; Hartford, Conn. (for ESPN invitees) and Hurst, Texas. The Texas site, according to Anthony Bailey, ESPN's vice president for emerging technology, was chosen because ESPN would like to see how a 3-D broadcast would do in a place unaffiliated with either team playing.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2009 | Ben Fritz and Richard Verrier
20th Century Fox's high-profile stare-down with exhibitors over who would pay for digital 3-D glasses to go with "Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs" has been settled. But the issues underlying the dispute will almost certainly flare up again. Fox, which had initially threatened to make theater owners bear the costs, has agreed to pick up the tab, according to several people familiar with the matter. The glasses are supplied by RealD, a Beverly Hills company that provides 3-D technology to theaters.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2009 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
Apparently, size does matter. As you may remember, comedian and "Parks and Recreation" costar Aziz Ansari recently caused a huge flap when he put up an outraged post on his blog excoriating Imax after he went to see "Star Trek" in Burbank -- and discovered that the supposedly giant Imax screen was barely any bigger than an average-size theater screen. Feeling ripped off (after all, he'd paid an extra $5), he blasted Imax for "duping" its customers and "whoring out their brand name."
BUSINESS
May 19, 2009 | John Horn
The Cannes Film Festival has no shortage of big-budget 3-D spectacles: It opened with Pixar's 3-D animated film "Up," and Disney on Monday showed footage from its upcoming 3-D holiday movie "A Christmas Carol," while fake snow decorated the landmark Carlton Hotel in the 80-degree Cannes weather. But the immersive technology also is attracting a growing crowd of independent filmmakers, some of whom are making -- and trying to sell -- 3-D movies on a fraction of Pixar's and Disney's budgets.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2003 | From Associated Press
Users won't need special glasses to view the three-dimensional images that pop up from Japanese electronics maker Sharp Corp.'s new laptop. The Mebius PC-RD3D, billed by Sharp as the world's first 3-D laptop, goes on sale Oct. 27 in Japan and is planned for release later this year in the United States. The new laptop is mostly targeted for people who design three-dimensional software, but Sharp also is planning a model for average consumers, a company spokeswoman said.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2003 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
The 3-D movie craze took Hollywood and movie audiences by storm in 1952 and then, as is the case with most fads and novelties, disappeared almost as quickly as it arrived. Although its heyday lasted just slightly more than a year, Hollywood churned out 50 features, several short subjects and a handful of cartoons in 3-D in hopes of luring audiences from their homes and their increasing love affair with television.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2009 | Associated Press
Walt Disney is going 3-D on a lot of future films -- and some from its past. The studio announced Tuesday that 3-D versions of the computer-animated tales "Toy Story" and "Toy Story 2" would be released Oct. 2 for a two-week run as a double feature. Disney also is preparing a 3-D version of its hand-drawn animated musical "Beauty and the Beast" for release Feb. 12, 2010. With 17 3-D releases in the works through 2012, Disney offered a preview of its lineup at ShoWest in Las Vegas, an annual convention of theater owners.
BUSINESS
January 23, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
In an effort to get theater owners to upgrade their technology, Paramount Pictures will pay exhibitors to show its movies in 3-D. The new offer begins with the March 27 release of "Monsters vs. Aliens," said Mark Christiansen, Paramount's executive vice president for operations. The studio is offering a similar incentive for films shown in a digital format, he said. Under Paramount's offer, the studio will help defray the cost of converting at least one digital screen to 3-D. Separately, the studio is offering similar fees to chains that convert at least half their screens to digital.
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