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Thyroid

NEWS
December 29, 1999 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tipper Gore, wife of the vice president, had surgery Tuesday to remove a suspicious nodule from her thyroid gland, Vice President Al Gore's office announced. The nodule is to be examined for possible signs of cancer, but the results are not expected until next week, said Camille Johnston, Mrs. Gore's press secretary. Mrs. Gore, 51, was resting comfortably after the two-hour procedure at the Johns Hopkins University Medical Center in Baltimore, Johnston said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1999
Children born to women who suffer from thyroid disease during a pregnancy have significantly lower IQs and a decrease in motor skills, language and reading abilities. However, treatment during pregnancy can prevent the deficits, according to researchers from the Foundation for Blood Research in Scarborough, Maine. The team examined stored blood samples taken from more than 25,000 pregnant women between 1987 and 1990 and identified 62 who had low levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1999
After the Chernobyl nuclear plant disaster, the thyroid cancer rate among Ukrainian youths in the surrounding area shot up tenfold, according to a new study that refines earlier estimates. In the decade after the 1986 reactor explosion, researchers have counted 577 cases of thyroid cancer in youths 18 and under, compared to just 59 cases in the previous five years. That translates into a rate of 45 cases per 10 million youths, up from four to six cases per 10 million beforehand.
HEALTH
July 27, 1998 | JOE GRAEDON and TERESA GRAEDON
Question: I've been on Synthroid for almost 10 years. My dosage has gone from 0.1 mg to 0.175 mg. (Once I tried generic pills and those did not work.) I've gained about 40 pounds over these years, and I have trouble taking off the weight, even though most of the time the blood tests seem OK. My enthusiasm for exercise has also vanished, although I was a professional ballet and musical comedy dancer for quite a few years. Please send me any information you have on the thyroid. --S.G.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1997
Re "Next Time, Listen to Mother," Column Left, by Ruth Rosen, Aug. 7: My extended family and I were having an adventurous time attending the various events at the 1984 Olympics. I had a check-up with my doctor during this time that put a pall on the celebrations. He was direct and helpful. I was not well, I needed to see the oncologist on the fourth floor. Had I ever been exposed to radiation? I had thyroid cancer. Above-ground nuclear testing was suspected, but from atmospheric exposure, not milk.
BUSINESS
August 12, 1997 | (Associated Press)
A pharmaceutical company has agreed to pay up to $135 million to settle allegations it suppressed research showing that its prescription thyroid drug is no better than cheaper alternatives. As many as 8 million consumers who paid two to three times more for Synthroid are eligible, plaintiffs' attorney Allan Kanner said. Knoll Pharmaceutical Co., a Mount Olive, N.J.-based subsidiary of BASF Corp. in Germany, admitted no wrongdoing under the settlement, which was reached Aug.
NEWS
August 2, 1997 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
As many as 75,000 people exposed to iodine-131 in fallout from above-ground nuclear bomb tests in the 1950s could develop thyroid cancer as a result, according to data released Friday by the National Cancer Institute. At highest risk are people who were children during the 1950s and who drank milk contaminated with the radioactive iodine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1997 | THAO HUA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the day Sierra Creason was born at Los Alamitos Medical Center, her parents thought they had the perfect baby--until they brought her home. The life just seemed to vanish from the girl's eyes. Her smiles disappeared and were followed by endless tears. On some days, she slept for 14 hours at a time, yet appeared lethargic during waking hours. After dozens of medical tests and frantic visits to emergency rooms and pediatricians, the Creasons discovered why.
SPORTS
May 25, 1997 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Angel right fielder Tim Salmon got what he called "a reality check" this past week when his wife, Marci, was diagnosed with thyroid cancer. "It was a shellshocking revelation," said Salmon, who did not attend the Angels' game against Seattle in Anaheim Wednesday night but returned for this weekend's series in Toronto. "But we've met with the doctors, and they've eased our minds about it. This is something they can treat. It's not something that's terminal.
NEWS
May 18, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An $8.5-billion lawsuit was filed in federal court against Germany's BASF AG and U.S. unit Knoll Pharmaceutical Co alleging they suppressed a medical study to control the U.S. market for thyroid drugs, attorneys said. The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in San Francisco, alleged that BASF, Knoll and Boots Pharmaceutical concealed a seven-year university study that concluded that their thyroid drug was no better than cheaper, generic brands to treat people suffering from hypothyroidism.
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