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May 28, 2004 | Hugh Hart, Special to The Times
The last time Tian Zhuangzhuang made a feature film, it got him blacklisted by the Chinese government. In 1992, he directed "The Blue Kite," the tale of a spunky child and his family who are torn asunder by Mao Tse-tung's Great Leap Forward experiment in collectivization. The story mirrored some of Tian's own experiences. As a teenager in the late '60s, he'd been deemed an uncooperative Red Guard and was sent to the Chinese countryside to be "reeducated" by peasants.
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May 28, 2004 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
A film about the geometry of desire, "Springtime in a Small Town" opens with a vision of ruin. In a bombed-out Chinese village in 1946, in the wake of Japan's retreat, a husband and wife pass the days in a somnolent haze. Cast away in a crumbling house, attended to by an elderly servant and with only the husband's young sister for company, the pair live like refugees of the world and each other.
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December 10, 1995 | Kenneth Turan
Of all the remarkable movies to have come out of China in recent years, this 1994 Tian Zhuangzhuang film could well be the most authentic, accessible and powerful. Daringly political and quietly shattering, it tells the truth in such a completely human way that it seems hardly foreign at all.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2004 | Hugh Hart, Special to The Times
The last time Tian Zhuangzhuang made a feature film, it got him blacklisted by the Chinese government. In 1992, he directed "The Blue Kite," the tale of a spunky child and his family who are torn asunder by Mao Tse-tung's Great Leap Forward experiment in collectivization. The story mirrored some of Tian's own experiences. As a teenager in the late '60s, he'd been deemed an uncooperative Red Guard and was sent to the Chinese countryside to be "reeducated" by peasants.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1996 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Keeping an international perspective in selecting movies makes sense to UC Irvine Film Society coordinator Alice Parsons. "Given our cultural mix [on campus], it just seems natural that we would appeal to a broad cultural background," said Parsons, who oversees programs organized each semester by a handful of movie-loving students. "We've been devoted [to a world view] for a long time. We feel we should be educational as well as appealing."
NEWS
November 21, 2002 | Scarlet Cheng, Special to The Times
Since the 1950s, filmmaking in China has been clamped in the vise of communist censorship, and predictably sanitized and politically correct fare has been the order of the day. Recently there has been not just a trickle but a surge of feature films from that country that would not have been possible 10 years ago, as the "New Chinese Cinema" series from the UCLA Film and Television Archive demonstrates.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2004 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
A film about the geometry of desire, "Springtime in a Small Town" opens with a vision of ruin. In a bombed-out Chinese village in 1946, in the wake of Japan's retreat, a husband and wife pass the days in a somnolent haze. Cast away in a crumbling house, attended to by an elderly servant and with only the husband's young sister for company, the pair live like refugees of the world and each other.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1995
"Looking Back," a series of films, both rare and familiar and all dealing with the past, commences Thursday at USC's Taper Hall of Humanities, Room 202, with the screening of "American Graffiti." Others are Tian Zhuangzhuang's "The Blue Kite" (Feb.
NEWS
May 19, 1996 | Kevin Thomas
Tian Zhuangzhuang's (1986) film takes us into Tibet in the '20s--it might as well be antiquity--and presents us with a young clansman, Norbu (Tseshang Rigzin, who brings to mind the Toshiro Mifune of "Rashomon"), so poor he stealshorses from transients to support his wife and 5-year-old son, yet so pious he gives most of his profits to the temple.
NEWS
November 21, 2002 | Scarlet Cheng, Special to The Times
Since the 1950s, filmmaking in China has been clamped in the vise of communist censorship, and predictably sanitized and politically correct fare has been the order of the day. Recently there has been not just a trickle but a surge of feature films from that country that would not have been possible 10 years ago, as the "New Chinese Cinema" series from the UCLA Film and Television Archive demonstrates.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1996 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Keeping an international perspective in selecting movies makes sense to UC Irvine Film Society coordinator Alice Parsons. "Given our cultural mix [on campus], it just seems natural that we would appeal to a broad cultural background," said Parsons, who oversees programs organized each semester by a handful of movie-loving students. "We've been devoted [to a world view] for a long time. We feel we should be educational as well as appealing."
NEWS
December 10, 1995 | Kenneth Turan
Of all the remarkable movies to have come out of China in recent years, this 1994 Tian Zhuangzhuang film could well be the most authentic, accessible and powerful. Daringly political and quietly shattering, it tells the truth in such a completely human way that it seems hardly foreign at all.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1994 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Of all the remarkable films to have come out of China over the past few years, "The Blue Kite" could well be the most authentic, the most accessible and, finally, the most powerful. Daring politically and quietly shattering emotionally, it tells the truth in such a completely human way that it hardly seems foreign at all.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1994 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Singapore's fourth annual film festival, designed to showcase the latest wave in Asian cinema, has ended on a surreal note with an entry banned by censors walking off with top honors. Eric Khoo, a young Singaporean filmmaker, won back-to-back awards for best director and special achievement in the short film category for his film "Pain," which deals with a man's obsession with enduring pain.
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