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WORLD
June 6, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
“ Fire in the Land of Snow ,” a documentary examining the spreading phenomenon of self-immolation protests in Tibet, provides the latest troubling chapter in the history of a solitary population inhabiting the Himalayan highlands known as the Roof of the World. An empire of nomadic tribes and remote principalities, Tibet fended off covetous Asian armies for centuries before the new revolutionaries ruling the People's Republic of China invaded in 1950 and embarked on a mission to force the agrarian Buddhists into communism's industrial mold.
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WORLD
February 21, 2014 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING -- China on Friday urged the U.S. to cancel President Obama's planned meeting with the Dalai Lama at the White House, saying the visit by the exiled Tibetan spiritual leader would "severely impair China-U.S. relations. " "Tibet-related affairs fall entirely within the internal affairs of China, which allow no foreign interference," Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying said in a statement. "The Dalai Lama is a political exile who has long been engaged in anti-China separatist activities under the cloak of religion.
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WORLD
November 5, 2012 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
BEIJING - In the last three months, two of Thinlay Gyatso's relatives have set themselves on fire in protest against Chinese rule, and the 31-year-old Tibetan academic is still sorting out his conflicted emotions over their suicides. If any of them had confided their plans, he said, he would have tried to stop them. "From the beginning, I said this was not a good thing to burn yourself," he said. On the other hand, he acknowledged a swell of pride in his relatives - one of them a 26-year-old mother of two young children who was his second cousin, the other an uncle who was in his 50s. "People respect the ones who have immolated themselves.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
In the world of postmodern opera production, setting "Carmen" on a cruise ship or "La Bohème" on a submarine is no longer considered eccentric. Stage directors are paid to come up with concepts. And so for his Long Beach Opera production of Peter Lieberson's "King Gesar" on Saturday night, Andreas Mitisek had both the Queen Mary and a submarine docked in front of it. His backdrop was the Long Beach skyline. He even included the sounds of Long Beach's beloved Lobster Festival wafting over the bay. What was unusual, though, was that this was no concept.
WORLD
August 4, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Scores of people were arrested in a traditionally Tibetan area of western China after public calls for the return of Tibet's exiled spiritual leader, the Dalai Lama, reports said. China also moved to tighten its control over Tibetan Buddhism by asserting the communist government's sole right to recognize Buddhist reincarnations of the lamas that form the backbone of the religion's clergy.
SCIENCE
July 3, 2010 | By Rachel Bernstein, Los Angeles Times
The Tibet plateau is a land of yaks and sherpas — and rapid evolution. Over a mere 3,000 years, a blink of an evolutionary eye, Tibetan highlanders have developed a unique version of a gene that apparently helps them cope with life at extremely high altitudes, according to a study published Friday in the journal Science. The research group, led by UC Berkeley biologist Rasmus Nielsen, found the gene by comparing DNA from 50 Tibetans and 40 neighboring Han Chinese. The two ethnic groups are closely related, with one important difference: The Tibetans live at elevations of 14,000 feet and higher, while the Han population generally lives relatively close to sea level.
WORLD
October 23, 2011 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
Shopkeepers peer out from storefronts festooned with traditional Tibetan prayer flags at platoons of armed police, some carrying an unusual addition to their riot regalia: fire extinguishers. A string of self-immolations by young Buddhist monks in Sichuan province is unnerving the Chinese government and giving a new, more radical momentum to the Tibetan protest movement. On Monday, the ninth young Tibetan — and the first woman — killed herself in the small town of Aba by self-immolation in a protest against Chinese rule.
OPINION
March 31, 2008
Re "Last of the Tibetans," Opinion, March 26 Ian Buruma has many good points about the dangers Tibetan culture faces from Chinese modernization, but his opening sentences that describe American Indians as "doomed" and "reduced to peddling cheap mementos" call into question his ability to make such an assessment. Indeed, American Indians are going through a cultural renaissance wherein more of our youth are learning their languages, practicing their traditions and attaining more educational success than ever before.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 2013 | By Kate Linthicum
The leader of the Tibetan government in exile is in Los Angeles this week, and although his administration is not officially recognized by the U.S. or any other regime, Tibetans living here have done their best to mark his visit with all the pomp afforded a visiting head of state. On Sunday, they greeted him at Los Angeles International Airport with white scarves and flowers. Later, a line of shiny black cars, each festooned with a Tibetan flag, ferried him to a reception at a nearby church.
WORLD
July 21, 2010 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
For offenses as minor as printing a Tibetan flag, sending a text message about rioting or holding a photograph of the Dalai Lama, large numbers of Tibetans were badly beaten and tortured, and in some cases killed, by Chinese security forces in 2008, a human rights group reported Thursday. In the most comprehensive report yet on the crackdown on Tibetans during and after March 2008 protests, the most serious in decades, New York-based Human Rights Watch interviewed 203 people described as Tibetan eyewitnesses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 2013 | By Kate Linthicum
The leader of the Tibetan government in exile is in Los Angeles this week, and although his administration is not officially recognized by the U.S. or any other regime, Tibetans living here have done their best to mark his visit with all the pomp afforded a visiting head of state. On Sunday, they greeted him at Los Angeles International Airport with white scarves and flowers. Later, a line of shiny black cars, each festooned with a Tibetan flag, ferried him to a reception at a nearby church.
WORLD
June 27, 2013 | By Barbara Demick
XINING, China -- The U.S. ambassador to China, Gary Locke, paid a rare visit to Tibet this week as human rights advocates blasted the Chinese government's policy of luring Tibetan nomads into concrete housing projects with little job opportunities. In meetings with residents and officials, Locke stressed the need to preserve Tibetan culture and urged authorities to allow foreigners to travel more freely in the tightly controlled region, according to the Associated Press. The Tibetan Autonomous Region, as it is known, has been mostly closed to western diplomats and journalists since an uprising in 2008 against Chinese rule.
WORLD
June 6, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
“ Fire in the Land of Snow ,” a documentary examining the spreading phenomenon of self-immolation protests in Tibet, provides the latest troubling chapter in the history of a solitary population inhabiting the Himalayan highlands known as the Roof of the World. An empire of nomadic tribes and remote principalities, Tibet fended off covetous Asian armies for centuries before the new revolutionaries ruling the People's Republic of China invaded in 1950 and embarked on a mission to force the agrarian Buddhists into communism's industrial mold.
WORLD
November 9, 2012 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
BEIJING - As China launched its 18th Communist Party congress on Thursday, a record number of Tibetans immolated themselves in a stark illustration of the internal tensions facing the country's new leadership. Over a 48-hour period, at least five Tibetans were reported to have set themselves on fire in western China. Most of them were teenagers. As many as 6,000 people demonstrated against the government Thursday afternoon in Tongren, a monastery town in Qinghai province, after two self-immolations - a 23-year-old woman on Wednesday and a young former monk on Thursday, exile groups reported.
WORLD
November 5, 2012 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
BEIJING - In the last three months, two of Thinlay Gyatso's relatives have set themselves on fire in protest against Chinese rule, and the 31-year-old Tibetan academic is still sorting out his conflicted emotions over their suicides. If any of them had confided their plans, he said, he would have tried to stop them. "From the beginning, I said this was not a good thing to burn yourself," he said. On the other hand, he acknowledged a swell of pride in his relatives - one of them a 26-year-old mother of two young children who was his second cousin, the other an uncle who was in his 50s. "People respect the ones who have immolated themselves.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2012 | By Mindy Farabee
"Digital Dharma: One Man's Mission to Save a Culture," an informative if not entirely engaging documentary centered on American E. Gene Smith's lifelong efforts to collect and preserve the sacred texts of Tibetan Buddhism, pays homage to a noble undertaking but little illuminates the man whose passion animated it. Smith was born in Ogden, Utah, and raised in the Mormon faith. In the early 1960s, when Tibetan refugees began to arrive in the U.S., fleeing the Chinese occupation, Smith was a doctoral student studying Asian languages at the University of Washington.
NEWS
May 16, 1999
The greatest threat to those poor Tibetans comes not from the Chinese oppressors. It comes from the vacuous schemes of well-meaning Westerners such as Nathalie Marciano of Charles David ("In Her Shoes, You'd Help Tibetans Too" by Booth Moore, April 16). During my five months working as a volunteer in the exile Tibetan community of Dharamsala, India, I watched the parade of addlepated rich Americans sitting uncomfortably cross-legged at eight-hour-long teachings by the Dalai Lama. Back in the States, I hear them uttering the very word "Tibet" with such reverence that I've considered trademarking it. Yes, the situation in Tibet is dire.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1998 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is a tale to tell the children sitting around the table after a festive dinner: How the pilgrims suffered political and religious persecution and decided to flee their homeland. How their journey proved long and perilous. How they arrived both fearful and hopeful in a new country and had to rely on the natives for their survival. And finally, how they came to celebrate their newfound home with a feast of thanksgiving.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 2012 | By Richard Cromelin, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It had only been a few years since Adam Yauch had found fame as the in-your-face rapper and bass player MCA in the transgressive, boundary-breaking trio the Beastie Boys. But in 1992 he was searching for something else, traveling in Nepal to snowboard and pursue a growing interest in Buddhism when he came upon a group of Tibetan refugees. The encounter intensified his interest in the teachings of the Dalai Lama, and he was soon one of the world's leading advocates for the cause of Tibetan independence.
TRAVEL
March 18, 2012
1. Poland, a major food exporter, removed from the market half a million pounds of food, including pickles and bread, because of fears it contained industrial salt, used for de-icing roads. 2. A performance this month of North Korea's Unhasu Orchestra in Paris, arranged by the principal conductor of the Seoul Philharmonic, may signal a slight thaw in relations with the West. 3. Five men were flogged six times each in the Aceh province of Indonesia after their conviction on gambling charges.
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