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Tibetans

WORLD
March 10, 2011 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The Dalai Lama, the exiled Tibetan spiritual leader, said Thursday that he will pass the reins of political power to the elected prime minister of the self-proclaimed Tibetan government in exile. The announcement formalizes an approach the Tibetan leader has been edging toward for years, hoping to prevent a political vacuum after his death and ensure an effective response to Chinese crackdowns and Beijing's increasingly effective use of diplomatic pressure. But the Dalai Lama, 75, made a point of saying he wasn't retiring, and his global status and reputation ensure that he will continue to play a major role in Tibetan affairs.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2011 | By Seth Faison, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Colin Thubron, the acclaimed British travel writer, has ventured through Russia, China and Central Asia. With restrained, spare prose, Thubron is a versatile painter of place, capturing the look and the language of locales. His "To a Mountain in Tibet" reads more like an elegy than a traditional story of travels. His trek takes him toward the "lonely peak" of Mt. Kailash, considered by Tibetans to be the holiest mountain in their highly elevated desert. Following an itinerary through a remote section of western Nepal, passing tiny, impoverished villages, on foot and by Jeep, ordinarily would offer a firm framework for his story.
NEWS
January 1, 1992 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An unprecedented migration to the United States of Tibetan refugees, displaced by decades of Communist Chinese rule, will begin this year in an unusual resettlement that promises to reshape one of the smallest and most obscure minority groups in the nation. During the last 30 years, just 500 Tibetans have come to this country, scattered in tiny pockets from Los Angeles to Long Island.
NEWS
June 14, 1994 | ELISABETH GRINSPOON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sonam is a tall, handsome, 34-year-old taxi driver who worships both Buddha and Rambo, oblivious to any contradictions that might imply. Jigme is a 44-year-old carpenter, rebuilding a famous Buddhist monastery that was destroyed during China's 10-year Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution that sent rampaging Red Guards into the four corners of Tibet.
NEWS
November 7, 1990 | K.E.S. KIRBY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"This," says Galen Rowell, tapping a page of his latest book with his forefinger, "this is the photo that got me in trouble." It was not even one of his own, those miracles of image and light that have made Rowell one of America's foremost mountain photographers and adventurers for more than 15 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1999 | PHILIP BRANDES
Where all too many theatrical presentations simply pay lip service to multidisciplinary art forms, writer-director-composer-designer-comparative mythologist Stephen Legawiec does something meaningful with them. Legawiec's Ziggurat Theatre (formerly the Gilgamesh Theatre) has garnered well-deserved acclaim for its evocative weaving of disparate elements into rich, expertly staged explorations of the human psyche.
WORLD
March 15, 2008 | Mark Magnier, Times Staff Writer
Tibet was hit by a fresh wave of violence Friday as protests by hundreds of Buddhist monks and other residents against Chinese rule resulted in burned shops, vandalized police vehicles and at least 10 deaths, government officials and witnesses said. American citizens in Lhasa, the capital of Tibet, reported rioting and gunfire, the U.S. Embassy in Beijing said in a warning to stay away from the city, which has seen several days of anti-Chinese protests. "All care should be taken to avoid unnecessary movement within the city until the situation is under control," the alert said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1995 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The 18-year-old carjacker and probation camp inmate furrowed his brow as he carefully tapped grains of orange sand out of a hollow tube, sketching a fine line around a mandala--a three-foot-wide sand painting. "When I came here, I didn't have no patience," said Jimmy, a Maywood gang member incarcerated at Camp David Gonzales who is studying the ancient art under Tibetan monks. "When somebody looked at me wrong, I'd hit them." "Now I got patience." An onlooking monk smiled approvingly.
NEWS
May 10, 1986 | Associated Press
China will open 12 more Tibetan peaks to foreign climbers during the next five years, the New China News Agency said Friday. Five of the new areas will open this year, including Cho Oyu, the world's sixth-highest mountain.
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