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Tiburcio Vasquez

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June 5, 1994 | BARBARA ISENBERG, Barbara Isenberg is a Times staff writer
A Martinez vividly remembers childhood trips north from Los Angeles. In the car, the future actor's grandmother would tell tales of Tiburcio Vasquez, the notorious bandido who frequented those parts back in the 1850s. Sometimes Martinez's father would stop the car at Vasquez Rocks near Agua Dulce, then pull out his 8-millimeter movie camera. When he and his brothers saw the camera pointing at them, Martinez recalls, "we would shoot each other immediately, then spend the next three minutes dying."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2010 | By Steve Harvey, Special to The Times
A jailed murder suspect poses for a series of photographs to be sold to the public, then becomes the subject of a quickie biography, then confers behind bars with an actor who wants to dramatize his life on stage. Sounds like the story of a modern-day headline-maker. But the subject was actually an Old West outlaw named Tiburcio Vasquez, who spent 10 memorable days in a Los Angeles hoosegow in 1874. He had been captured after a shootout at the adobe of an acquaintance, "Greek George" Caralambo, an ex-camel driver for the U.S. Army.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1993 | JOSE ANTONIO BURCIAGA, Jose Antonio Burciaga is an artist and writer at Stanford University, and author of "Drink Cultura" ( Captra Press, 1993 ) in which he deals with this subject. and
The Santa Clarita school board recently voted unanimously to name the new high school in Agua Dulce after Tiburcio Vasquez. Agua Dulce, 45 miles north of Los Angeles, is the site of Vasquez Rocks, where Vasquez often hid out. But a storm of controversy erupted: Tiburcio Vasquez! The scourge of 19th-Century California! A horse thief and stagecoach robber!
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 1994 | ROB ESHMAN, Rob Eshman is a Santa Monica-based writer and a contributing editor to the Los Angeles Jewish Journal. His article about Emil Harris in Los Angeles Magazine was optioned for the movies by FTM Productions
During intermission at a recent performance of Luis Valdez's new play "Bandido!" at the Mark Taper Forum, I noticed that only about half the audience had left their seats. The other half remained bent over their copies of the performance's program, looking less like happy theatergoers and more like students sweating out a blue book exam.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1994 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Speaking of "Zoot Suit," his 1978 play that marked El Teatro Campesino's famous first collaboration with the Mark Taper Forum, Luis Valdez once remarked that his intention was to "disenravel" certain ethnic stereotypes by re-examining them "directly in historical and theatrical terms."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1991
The Monterey Park City Council has decided it isn't too late to honor the city's most notable historical characters--a group ranging from potato chip queen Laura Scudder to Tiburcio Vasquez, a legendary Mexican bandido. The council approved a list of 20 names, each to be used whenever a new street is paved. The top six constitute a kind of A-list and will be used first. Among the honorees is Scudder, who on Nov. 26, 1926, fried her first batch of potato chips in a factory in the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1993 | RICHARD JEPPERSON, Richard M. Jepperson is an adjunct professor of communications at Cal Poly Pomona. He has directed and taught on-reservation training programs for the Sioux, Cheyenne and Navajo. His grandfather was French and Cree. and
The school board of Santa Clarita should have been more careful about naming a high school after a supposed bandit hero of the romantic past. Tiburcio Vasquez is an unworthy candidate for canonization. "Foreigners in Their Native Land: Historical Roots of the Mexican American," a respected text edited by David J. Weber with foreword by Ramon Eduardo Ruiz, contains this passage wherein Vasquez explained why he was driven to crime: "Americans . . . would . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 1994 | ROB ESHMAN, Rob Eshman is a Santa Monica-based writer and a contributing editor to the Los Angeles Jewish Journal. His article about Emil Harris in Los Angeles Magazine was optioned for the movies by FTM Productions
During intermission at a recent performance of Luis Valdez's new play "Bandido!" at the Mark Taper Forum, I noticed that only about half the audience had left their seats. The other half remained bent over their copies of the performance's program, looking less like happy theatergoers and more like students sweating out a blue book exam.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1994 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Speaking of "Zoot Suit," his 1978 play that marked El Teatro Campesino's famous first collaboration with the Mark Taper Forum, Luis Valdez once remarked that his intention was to "disenravel" certain ethnic stereotypes by re-examining them "directly in historical and theatrical terms."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1994 | BARBARA ISENBERG, Barbara Isenberg is a Times staff writer
A Martinez vividly remembers childhood trips north from Los Angeles. In the car, the future actor's grandmother would tell tales of Tiburcio Vasquez, the notorious bandido who frequented those parts back in the 1850s. Sometimes Martinez's father would stop the car at Vasquez Rocks near Agua Dulce, then pull out his 8-millimeter movie camera. When he and his brothers saw the camera pointing at them, Martinez recalls, "we would shoot each other immediately, then spend the next three minutes dying."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1993 | RICHARD JEPPERSON, Richard M. Jepperson is an adjunct professor of communications at Cal Poly Pomona. He has directed and taught on-reservation training programs for the Sioux, Cheyenne and Navajo. His grandfather was French and Cree. and
The school board of Santa Clarita should have been more careful about naming a high school after a supposed bandit hero of the romantic past. Tiburcio Vasquez is an unworthy candidate for canonization. "Foreigners in Their Native Land: Historical Roots of the Mexican American," a respected text edited by David J. Weber with foreword by Ramon Eduardo Ruiz, contains this passage wherein Vasquez explained why he was driven to crime: "Americans . . . would . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1993 | JOSE ANTONIO BURCIAGA, Jose Antonio Burciaga is an artist and writer at Stanford University, and author of "Drink Cultura" ( Captra Press, 1993 ) in which he deals with this subject. and
The Santa Clarita school board recently voted unanimously to name the new high school in Agua Dulce after Tiburcio Vasquez. Agua Dulce, 45 miles north of Los Angeles, is the site of Vasquez Rocks, where Vasquez often hid out. But a storm of controversy erupted: Tiburcio Vasquez! The scourge of 19th-Century California! A horse thief and stagecoach robber!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1993 | SAM ENRIQUEZ and JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Gang leader Tiburcio Vasquez was never a tagger. He preferred armed occupation and looting of entire towns. At least until he was hanged for murder in San Jose. On the plus side, he had exceptionally good handwriting and was apparently well-educated. Still, there was some grumbling that perhaps Vasquez, who died in 1875, might not be the best historic figure to use for naming a proposed new high school in Agua Dulce.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2010 | By Steve Harvey, Special to The Times
A jailed murder suspect poses for a series of photographs to be sold to the public, then becomes the subject of a quickie biography, then confers behind bars with an actor who wants to dramatize his life on stage. Sounds like the story of a modern-day headline-maker. But the subject was actually an Old West outlaw named Tiburcio Vasquez, who spent 10 memorable days in a Los Angeles hoosegow in 1874. He had been captured after a shootout at the adobe of an acquaintance, "Greek George" Caralambo, an ex-camel driver for the U.S. Army.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1993 | SAM ENRIQUEZ and JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Gang leader Tiburcio Vasquez was never a tagger. He preferred armed occupation and looting of entire towns. At least until he was hanged for murder in San Jose. On the plus side, he had exceptionally good handwriting and was apparently well-educated. Still, there was some grumbling that perhaps Vasquez, who died in 1875, might not be the best historic figure to use for naming a proposed new high school in Agua Dulce.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1991
The Monterey Park City Council has decided it isn't too late to honor the city's most notable historical characters--a group ranging from potato chip queen Laura Scudder to Tiburcio Vasquez, a legendary Mexican bandido. The council approved a list of 20 names, each to be used whenever a new street is paved. The top six constitute a kind of A-list and will be used first. Among the honorees is Scudder, who on Nov. 26, 1926, fried her first batch of potato chips in a factory in the city.
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