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Ticket Scalping

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1994
Speaking just in public-relations terms, it's been a tough year for UCLA. Student hunger strikes. Faculty houses unsold on the West Side. The flap over Michael Milken's lecture contract. Amid all the negative news, the football team's Rose Bowl appearance was supposed to be an uptick. Guess again. Chancellor Charles E. Young and other UCLA officials are now caught up in a new mess over Rose Bowl ticket scalping.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1992 | KEVIN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No matter how bad the Angels are playing on the field, Anaheim police say there is one loyal group of "fans" who are never too discouraged to stay away from the Big A. Many of them arrive hours before game time to stake out their positions, but are out of the parking lot before the national anthem's end. They are ticket scalpers. And even with the home team lurching through a lost season, the off-field pros never seem to miss a game.
SPORTS
August 1, 1992 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A ticket mess that underlies all those empty seats at Olympic events is giving planners here a double case of embarrassment, but help may be on the way. Officially, attendance has been higher than it was four years ago in Seoul. But cameras don't lie. One event after another in the opening week has unfolded to yawning rows of seats in stadiums and arenas that in many cases were reported sold out months ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 1992 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
So much for trying to beat the scalpers. Despite elaborate efforts to thwart scalping at U2's upcoming Los Angeles Sports Arena shows, prime seats are being sold by independent brokers for as much as $1,200 each. That's 48 times the tickets' $25 face value--double what brokers got for seats to Madonna's 1990 concerts at the same arena, the previous ticket high in Los Angeles.
NEWS
March 23, 1992 | CHUCK PHILIPS
It is almost impossible to purchase a ticket at face value to a concert anywhere in Southern California these days--even if you do not shop at a broker. Why do concert tickets so frequently end up costing more than the advertised price? Sellers add a variety of service fees, which profit the ticket agency handling the transaction and the venue staging the event. Take the March 31 environmental benefit, "Concert for Walden Woods," at the Universal Amphitheatre.
NEWS
March 23, 1992 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Twenty-five-dollar tickets for Irish rock sensation U2's first Southern California concerts in five years will go on sale tonight at 7. But chances are you will not get one. And if you do, you could wind up paying a ticket broker as much as $600 for it. Demand is so high for seats at the band's two shows at the 16,000-seat Los Angeles Sports Arena on April 12 and 13 that they could sell out in the time it takes to read this article. U2's "ZOO TV" tour is the hottest rock show of the year.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1992 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jerry Adelman can't understand why organizers of the Academy Awards are upset with him just because he wants to sell tickets to this year's glamorous Oscar telecast at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. "It's fun to go sit next to Jack Nicholson and the other stars," said Adelman, president of Murray's Tickets, a commercial ticket broker in Los Angeles.
SPORTS
January 30, 1992 | EARL GUSTKEY
It's the hottest ticket in town--yellow scraps of paper that read: "COURTROOM PASS--Public Seating." "You got one of these, you got something that's really hard to get," said Lorne Hill of Indianapolis, who works nights at a bank, processing checks. His pass was one of 17 issued to spectators for Wednesday's session of the Mike Tyson rape trial. "I stood in line here for four hours here yesterday starting at 6:30 a.m.
NEWS
June 15, 1991 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Caught in a cross-fire between promoters of rock concerts and independent agents who resell tickets at super-inflated prices, the Senate reversed itself Friday and narrowly approved a heavily lobbied bill to put scalpers in jail or out of business. The bill, supported by rock music impresario Bill Graham, was defeated last week, with 12 votes for and 15 against. But Sen.
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