Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsTicks
IN THE NEWS

Ticks

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1998 | PHIL DAVIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As if El Nino wasn't causing enough headaches with gully-washer storms and house-toppling mudslides, it's also responsible for a bumper crop of ticks in California. Worse still, some of the nasty little parasites are carrying a disease called ehrlichia--a bacteria that causes a severe flu-like illness in humans.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1999 | IRENE GARCIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ticks carrying Lyme disease have been found in Tapia Park and adjacent Malibu Creek State Park, Los Angeles County health officials reported Tuesday. The first confirmed Lyme disease-bearing tick in Los Angeles County was found last year in Topanga State Park, which, like Malibu Creek and Tapia, is part of the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area. "We found 37 male and 28 female ticks in that area, and they were divided into seven pools of eight to 10," said Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1998 | T. CHRISTIAN MILLER and CLAIRE VITUCCI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
County officials warned hikers on Thursday to be cautious in the Santa Monica Mountains after finding the first tick in Los Angeles County showing evidence of carrying Lyme disease. A hiker who frequents Topanga State Park reported finding the tick two weeks ago. Officials from the county's West Vector Control District said the tick tested positive for the disease, which can lead to severe neurological problems if left untreated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1998 | T. CHRISTIAN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County officials warned hikers on Thursday to be cautious in the Santa Monica Mountains after finding the first tick in the county showing evidence of carrying Lyme disease. A hiker who frequents Topanga State Park reported finding the tick two weeks ago. Officials from the West Vector Control District said the tick tested positive for the disease, which can lead to severe neurological problems if left untreated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1998 | T. CHRISTIAN MILLER and CLAIRE VITUCCI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
While evidence of the first Lyme disease-carrying tick in the Los Angeles area alarmed hikers and homeowners in the Santa Monica Mountains this week, the news brought vindication to Barbara Barsocchini. She is one of several local people found to have Lyme disease who say they have long been ignored by a medical community that is skeptical that the illness could originate in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1991 | LANIE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a brushy San Clemente canyon near the San Diego County border, Orange County health officials have found a tick infected with debilitating Lyme disease. That discovery marks the first such find in Southern California and the farthest south that an infected tick has ever been detected in California, local and state health officials said Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2000
Re "Hikers, Pet Owners Warned About Ticks," April 16. This article reported that tick season has arrived, and that 139 suspected cases of Lyme disease were reported in California, including one case in Ventura county. These figures give the reader a false sense of security regarding the danger of contracting Lyme disease in this area. The Centers for Disease Control estimates that Lyme disease is underreported by at least tenfold. That would indicate that there are at least 10 cases of Lyme disease contracted in Ventura county each year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1989 | From Times staff and wire reports
Scientists last week reported evidence debunking the theory that a distant relative of the AIDS virus that causes leukemia could be spread by insects. The researchers said they produced evidence that mosquitoes and ticks do not transmit HTLV-1, the human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type 1, a virus related to the AIDS virus that causes leukemia. "This is reassuring," said Dr. Edward Murphy, an assistant professor of laboratory medicine at UC San Francisco, who headed the research reported in a letter in the New England Journal of Medicine.
NEWS
August 16, 1989 | From Associated Press
A wasp no bigger than the dot of an "i" could play a big role in the fight against Lyme disease after its rediscovery by a victim of the ailment who was searching through old newspaper files. The state on Tuesday awarded a $15,000 grant to the University of Massachusetts at Amherst to collect chalcid wasps, reproduce them and eventually turn them loose on the deer tick, which carries Lyme disease.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|