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Tide Pools

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TRAVEL
September 11, 1994 | EILEEN OGINTZ
"Look, there's a starfish," Reggie said excitedly, pointing alongside the slippery rock. "I found the first crab," Matt said triumphantly. The kids gently touched the sticky sea anemones, making them close up like bumps on the rock. They splashed a barnacle and watched it open. They found snails and chitons clinging to the rocks.
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TRAVEL
December 30, 2012
EUROPE Workshop Veteran travelers will offer tips on planning, budgeting, lodging, transportation and other topics for first-time visitors to Europe. When, where: 10 a.m. Saturday at the Hostelling International Travel Store, 1434 2nd St., Santa Monica. Admission, info: Free. (310) 393-6263. PERU Presentation Adventurer and musician Chuck Jonkey will present a "Sonic Safari" of Peru, from the coastal Afro-Peruvian culture to the central and high Andes and the Quecha culture.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1990
Students will patrol two local tide pools during coming low tides in order to protect the fragile marine environment from people tempted to take starfish, rocks or other items found there. "People need to realize how fragile the tide pools are," said Lee Waian, head of Saddleback College's environmental studies department and adviser to a group of students from his campus and Dana Hills High School.
OPINION
December 26, 2012
This is the strange story of the California sheephead - a strikingly colored fish that swims in the kelp forests and can grow to nearly 3 feet long - as told to me by a marine scientist when I was training to volunteer at the local tide pools. To keep the sheephead stocks healthy, the state set a minimum size for those that could be caught. But over time, experts noticed that the average size of the adults was shrinking. It was an undesirable and unintended consequence of the rules: Smaller sheephead were thrown back into the water.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1993 | FRANK MESSINA
Taking advantage of seasonal low tides, the Orange County Marine Institute is offering a series of two-hour tours of coastal tide pools. The tours, to be held through March, will inspect the intricate tide-pool communities off the shores of Dana Point. Tide pools are visited by more people during the winter when tides expose larger stretches of beach. Institute officials hope to help preserve tide pools by educating the public.
NEWS
February 17, 1990 | MARIA NEWMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As an extensive effort to mop up the last of the 394,000-gallon oil spill was being scaled back Friday afternoon, a light foam of oil began washing ashore between Crystal Cove State Beach and Abalone Point. The news sent local officials and about 40 cleanup workers scrambling to keep the oil, which was spilled last week, from entering the tide pools that teem with sea life along the rocky coastline.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1991 | LISA MASCARO
Almost every school day, hundreds of children come in dozens of buses to visit the tide pools in Little Corona beach on field trips. Rather than pulling up in the free parking areas at Corona del Mar State Beach, also known as Big Corona, most buses stop in Judy Spindle's residential area to unload the pupils. Those stops in red zones have her seeing red.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1989 | Gerald Faris
You don't need a guide to visit the extensive tide pools below the San Pedro bluffs that stretch from Cabrillo Beach to well beyond Point Fermin. After all, the pools are a natural formation of rocks and water harboring sea life, and they are readily accessible to everyone at low tide. But if you don't take advantage of the free weekend tide-pool field trips led by Cabrillo Marine Museum naturalists Jim Burcheri and George Van Doren, there are a few things about the area you may never know.
NEWS
August 18, 1991 | ELIZABETH LOPREST, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
You want to relax. You want to forget about that report due yesterday, about the presentation next week, about the recent round of layoffs. Sunbathing is too passive, an amusement park too hectic. You need something peaceful and meaningful to connect with nature--but it can't be a hassle. What do you do? Observing small intertidal invertebrates may not instantly come to mind. But why not explore this harmonious world of tide pooling where sea and land meet?
NEWS
October 15, 1988 | SHEARLEAN DUKE, Shearlean Duke is a regular contributor to Orange County Life
With waves crashing just a few yards away, Natalie Lane, 7, places one small foot on a jagged rock, begins to lose her balance and reaches out to grab her mother's hand. Together mother and daughter crouch beside the small pool of seawater trapped between the wave-splashed rocks and uncovered by low tide. Under the watchful eye of naturalist Pam Johnson, a dozen others--children and adults--adopt similar poses as they explore the tide pools in the rocky reefs at Dana Point.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 2008 | Susannah Rosenblatt, Times Staff Writer
The nation's economy might be crumbling, and the housing market may be in crisis, but Newport Beach is still dreaming big. The wealthy beach town's aging City Hall, a conglomeration of overstuffed buildings wedged next to a supermarket, is getting a makeover. Five designs for a new civic center offer flamboyant and wildly divergent visions for the symbolic heart of Orange County affluence. What could be more Newport Beach than an illuminated, sail-shaped roof and an upscale wine bar?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 2005 | Nicholas Shields, Times Staff Writer
Matt Brown could easily be the envy of office workers toiling in cramped, windowless cubicles. Brown works under the sun, is cooled by ocean breezes and wears a shorts-and-sandals uniform that exposes the bear tattoo on his ankle. The former lifeguard and teacher is a beach cop of sorts, hired by Laguna Beach to protect tide pools that are easy prey for beachgoers oblivious to marine sanctuary laws. He was hired six months ago, when the city decided to get serious about protecting aquatic life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2004 | Stanley Allison, Times Staff Writer
The volunteer docents who organized a year ago to patrol Laguna Beach's tide pools had expected to find visitors trying to snatch aquatic souvenirs for home aquariums and bathroom decor. They didn't expect the tide pools' crabs, mussels and sea urchins to be targeted for dinner tables as well. The number of people harvesting the tide pools for seafood soup is small compared with the large number who trample, poke and remove the marine life, say lifeguards and docents.
NEWS
December 16, 2003 | Julie Sheer, Times Staff Writer
MOTHER Nature has a gift next week for Southern California beachcombers -- the best tide pooling of the year. Pools and rocky crevices along the shore regularly fill when waves sweep across California's coastlines. When the water recedes, those pools are left teeming with sea creatures. And the lower the tide, the more diverse the life within the pools. Because of an unusual combination of natural events, low tide will be lower than usual from Dec.
NEWS
May 15, 2001 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Between the edge of land and the beginning of the sea lies a place like no other on Earth. In the narrow band where surf and turf collide, you can walk across several distinct zones of life in just a few footsteps. In a span of inches and days, evolution unfolds and life-and-death dramas play out between prey and predator. Intertidal zones are among the Earth's richest and most dynamic ecosystems. Yet they also are among its most vulnerable.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 2000 | ELAINE GALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The next time you're on the beach and think about snagging that seashell or ocean-smoothed rock, watch out for the Tide Pool Cops. Marine biologists blame declining numbers of tide pool creatures on beachgoers who nab seashells, not knowing they might someday be needed as a hermit crab's home. To keep poachers and casual collectors at bay, a growing number of police agencies across coastal Orange County are assigning officers to the tide pools and rocky beaches with citation books in hand.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 2000 | ELAINE GALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The next time you're on the beach and think about snagging that seashell or ocean-smoothed rock, watch out for the Tide Pool Cops. Marine biologists blame declining numbers of tide pool creatures on beachgoers who nab seashells, not knowing they might someday be needed as a hermit crab's home. To keep poachers and casual collectors at bay, a growing number of police agencies across coastal Orange County are assigning officers to the tide pools and rocky beaches with citation books in hand.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1990 | GERALD FARIS
At the tide pools beneath the bluffs south of the Cabrillo Marine Museum, not all sea life readily meets the eye. It's easy to spot the strands of kelp and algae that undulate in the wave-fed pools. Or you may see a hermit crab using an empty snail shell for refuge. But you have to hunt for little sea worms. (They hide under the rocks.) And some of those bumps on the rocks aren't rock at all. They're barnacles that have cemented themselves to the surface.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 2000 | JESSICA GARRISON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For the first time in a long time, Francisco Andrade was able to feel the spray of the ocean on his face and watch as waves rushed toward him across a sandy, kelp-strewn beach. Trips to the beach always were difficult because his wheelchair would get stuck in the sand. All that changed Thursday when Francisco, 15, joined about 40 other children at Cabrillo Beach in San Pedro to officially inaugurate a new wheelchair-accessible trail from the parking lot to tide pools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2000 | KATIE COOPER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A tanker truck laden with gasoline overturned on U.S. 101 early Sunday, spilling nearly 5,000 gallons of fuel across traffic lanes and down a culvert that drains into the ocean, killing crabs, fish and seabirds as high tide was receding. The 3:45 a.m. crash shut down a 10-mile stretch of the heavily traveled freeway between Carpinteria and Ventura, creating delays as long as three hours for Sunday travelers.
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