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Tiffeny Milbrett

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SPORTS
June 20, 2004 | From Associated Press
She scored the goal that won the gold medal for the U.S. women's soccer team in Atlanta. She was the leading American scorer at the magical women's World Cup in 1999, as well as at the 2000 Olympics in Sydney. For several years, she was by far the most dangerous offensive weapon in the world of women's soccer -- more intimidating and productive for a while than even Mia Hamm, who kept getting the awards and the attention.
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SPORTS
July 17, 2011 | By Grahame L. Jones
There are two women above all others who are especially qualified to voice an opinion about the Women's World Cup final between the U.S. and Japan on Sunday in Frankfurt, Germany. Shannon MacMillan and Tiffeny Milbrett are two of the finest attacking players the U.S. has produced. Gold-medal winners at the Atlanta Olympics in 1996 and silver-medal winners four years later at the Sydney Games, they also were teammates on the U.S. side that won the 1999 Women's World Cup. In other words, they know very well the kind of pressure the players on both teams will be under Sunday, and they also know firsthand that something special will be needed to make a difference.
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SPORTS
July 17, 2011 | By Grahame L. Jones
There are two women above all others who are especially qualified to voice an opinion about the Women's World Cup final between the U.S. and Japan on Sunday in Frankfurt, Germany. Shannon MacMillan and Tiffeny Milbrett are two of the finest attacking players the U.S. has produced. Gold-medal winners at the Atlanta Olympics in 1996 and silver-medal winners four years later at the Sydney Games, they also were teammates on the U.S. side that won the 1999 Women's World Cup. In other words, they know very well the kind of pressure the players on both teams will be under Sunday, and they also know firsthand that something special will be needed to make a difference.
SPORTS
July 24, 2005 | Lauren Peterson, Times Staff Writer
It was another goal among so many, a nifty little chip shot over the goalkeeper from just outside the penalty area in the 57th minute of a 7-0 rout of Ukraine in a friendly at the University of Portland on July 10. But for Tiffeny Milbrett, veteran forward for the U.S. women's national soccer team, it was so much more. "For me, what it means is, I'm not done," said Milbrett, who will play forward today when the U.S. plays Iceland at the Home Depot Center.
SPORTS
July 17, 2000
Tiffeny Milbrett scored 14 minutes into the second half, and the U.S. women's team defeated Norway, 1-0, Sunday in the opening game of the DFB Jubilee Tournament. Milbrett, who scored the winning goal against Brazil on July 3 in the championship of the first CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup, took a pass about 40 yards from the goal. After briefly letting the ball get away, she won it on a tackle, raced around a defender and scored from 12 yards out. The U.S.
SPORTS
November 3, 2002 | Grahame L. Jones, Times Staff Writer
Monica Franco must have felt like the proverbial duck in a shooting gallery. A tall duck, to be sure, but a duck nonetheless. And Tiffeny Milbrett was the shotgun. It was Franco's misfortune Saturday night to be in the nets for Panama at a time when the United States women's national team, and Milbrett in particular, decided to take target practice en route to a 9-0 victory.
SPORTS
May 2, 1999 | GRAHAME L. JONES
Memories, not to mention enough money to buy a home of her own in Oregon, were not the only things Tiffeny Milbrett brought back with her from Japan. "The scroll paintings, the kaki jiku, are my absolute favorites, so I brought back a few of those," the 26-year-old forward for the U.S. women's national team said the other day in Charlotte, N.C. "It could be [scenes of] the people, or the scenery, like the mountains, or cranes, or the bamboo. That's my favorite. The black and white bamboo.
SPORTS
September 18, 2003 | Grahame L. Jones, Times Staff Writer
With Isabel lurking darkly and dangerously off the coast, the approaching hurricane was a popular topic of conversation at the United States women's national team camp here Wednesday. The players trained in bright sunshine, but the wind was beginning to pick up and the clouds were slowly moving in. It was the lull before the storm. Tiffeny Milbrett can identify with that. She has been in a bit of a lull lately.
SPORTS
June 23, 1999 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When last spotted on a soccer field, Tiffeny Milbrett was face down on the Giants Stadium turf, wearing Danish cleat marks on her knees and thighs and Danish bruises everywhere else. Suffice to say the U.S. striker, the team's top goal scorer this year, had a rough time in Saturday's 3-0 American victory, often appearing the target of fouls by Denmark. But that didn't bother her. It was nerves that did.
SPORTS
June 6, 1999 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ask almost any soccer player on the planet if scoring the winning goal in the Olympic Games gold-medal match would be the ultimate career highlight and the answer would probably be a resounding yes. But not if you ask Tiffeny Milbrett. The striker who teams with Mia Hamm and Cindy Parlow to give the United States the most devastating attacking line in women's soccer is confident she can repeat the feat.
SPORTS
June 20, 2004 | From Associated Press
She scored the goal that won the gold medal for the U.S. women's soccer team in Atlanta. She was the leading American scorer at the magical women's World Cup in 1999, as well as at the 2000 Olympics in Sydney. For several years, she was by far the most dangerous offensive weapon in the world of women's soccer -- more intimidating and productive for a while than even Mia Hamm, who kept getting the awards and the attention.
SPORTS
September 18, 2003 | Grahame L. Jones, Times Staff Writer
With Isabel lurking darkly and dangerously off the coast, the approaching hurricane was a popular topic of conversation at the United States women's national team camp here Wednesday. The players trained in bright sunshine, but the wind was beginning to pick up and the clouds were slowly moving in. It was the lull before the storm. Tiffeny Milbrett can identify with that. She has been in a bit of a lull lately.
SPORTS
November 3, 2002 | Grahame L. Jones, Times Staff Writer
Monica Franco must have felt like the proverbial duck in a shooting gallery. A tall duck, to be sure, but a duck nonetheless. And Tiffeny Milbrett was the shotgun. It was Franco's misfortune Saturday night to be in the nets for Panama at a time when the United States women's national team, and Milbrett in particular, decided to take target practice en route to a 9-0 victory.
NEWS
December 7, 2000 | JINNY GUDMUNDSEN, jinny@choosechildrensoftware.com
Soccer players Cobi Jones, midfielder for the Los Angeles Galaxy, and Tiffeny Milbrett, forward for the Women's National Team, star in "Backyard Soccer MLS Edition" as cartoon kid kickers. How do real players end up as cartoon characters? Jones: I wanted to be in a children's game where kids get to participate in something that is not violent and that is good, basic fun. You know how you always hear about actors wanting to be in cartoon movies?
SPORTS
July 17, 2000
Tiffeny Milbrett scored 14 minutes into the second half, and the U.S. women's team defeated Norway, 1-0, Sunday in the opening game of the DFB Jubilee Tournament. Milbrett, who scored the winning goal against Brazil on July 3 in the championship of the first CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup, took a pass about 40 yards from the goal. After briefly letting the ball get away, she won it on a tackle, raced around a defender and scored from 12 yards out. The U.S.
SPORTS
June 23, 1999 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When last spotted on a soccer field, Tiffeny Milbrett was face down on the Giants Stadium turf, wearing Danish cleat marks on her knees and thighs and Danish bruises everywhere else. Suffice to say the U.S. striker, the team's top goal scorer this year, had a rough time in Saturday's 3-0 American victory, often appearing the target of fouls by Denmark. But that didn't bother her. It was nerves that did.
SPORTS
July 24, 2005 | Lauren Peterson, Times Staff Writer
It was another goal among so many, a nifty little chip shot over the goalkeeper from just outside the penalty area in the 57th minute of a 7-0 rout of Ukraine in a friendly at the University of Portland on July 10. But for Tiffeny Milbrett, veteran forward for the U.S. women's national soccer team, it was so much more. "For me, what it means is, I'm not done," said Milbrett, who will play forward today when the U.S. plays Iceland at the Home Depot Center.
SPORTS
March 17, 1999 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All that was needed was a little laughter, or at least a smile, and Tiffeny Milbrett was happy to oblige. Her two goals--the first a long-range rocket, the second a piece of close-in opportunism--helped power the United States to an impressive 4-0 victory over Finland on Tuesday and restored the Americans' chance of winning the sixth Algarve Cup women's soccer tournament. "I think sometimes our team is a little too serious, to the point where we're a little hard on ourselves," Milbrett said.
SPORTS
June 6, 1999 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ask almost any soccer player on the planet if scoring the winning goal in the Olympic Games gold-medal match would be the ultimate career highlight and the answer would probably be a resounding yes. But not if you ask Tiffeny Milbrett. The striker who teams with Mia Hamm and Cindy Parlow to give the United States the most devastating attacking line in women's soccer is confident she can repeat the feat.
SPORTS
May 2, 1999 | GRAHAME L. JONES
Memories, not to mention enough money to buy a home of her own in Oregon, were not the only things Tiffeny Milbrett brought back with her from Japan. "The scroll paintings, the kaki jiku, are my absolute favorites, so I brought back a few of those," the 26-year-old forward for the U.S. women's national team said the other day in Charlotte, N.C. "It could be [scenes of] the people, or the scenery, like the mountains, or cranes, or the bamboo. That's my favorite. The black and white bamboo.
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