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Tijuana Mexico

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2004 | From a Times Staff Writer
A moderate earthquake centered offshore about 45 miles west of Tijuana rattled that city and San Diego on Tuesday afternoon, but there were no reports of major damage or injury. Seismologists at Caltech said the 5.2-magnitude temblor occurred at 3:29 p.m. They said it had not been determined whether the quake was on a known fault. The quake was felt as far away as Los Angeles and the Palm Springs area.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2004 | Reed Johnson, Times Staff Writer
The images blur and body-slam together like a rough cut of a kung-fu movie: A machine gun in stark monochrome silhouette. Grainy photos of airline passengers being herded off to who-knows-where. A man scaling a fence. Osama bin Laden framed by a bull's-eye. Enigmatic phrases in Spanish, spliced together like old Chevy parts in some back-alley chop shop. Splattered across a section of the infamous wall that keeps Mexico at arm's length from the United States -- or is it the other way around?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
An $85,000 grant from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is expected to launch a project this summer to clean up an abandoned lead smelter site in Tijuana. The funds from the EPA's Office of International Affairs will be used for planning and to stabilize some of the 6,000 tons of lead waste at the site, which sits near a residential neighborhood known as Ejido Chipancingo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2003 | By a Times Staff Writer
Four police officers in Tijuana have been charged in connection with the alleged rape of an American tourist as she tried to return to the United States after spending the day in the border city, officials announced Wednesday. The incident allegedly occurred Oct. 7 as the woman, her husband and their young son were walking across the border at the San Ysidro crossing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 2002 | Anna Gorman, Times Staff Writer
Many of this border city's police officers have a notorious history of teaming up with drug dealers, accepting bribes and intimidating tourists. City leaders have tried to combat corruption in the past by firing officers and raising salaries. In their latest attempt to rein in overzealous and crooked law enforcement, city officials have moved to separate the police and judicial departments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 2002 | Anne-Marie O'Connor, Times Staff Writer
Pity the poor city of Tijuana. Since Prohibition put it on the map, Tijuana has been known for drinking too much, partying too late, and embracing hedonistic strangers. But like an aging wild child, it wants to be known for more. Tijuana is trying to change its image. If the city pulls it off, it will be its biggest reinvention since a Tijuana nightclub dancer named Margarita Cansino morphed into sultry Hollywood legend Rita Hayworth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 2001 | JENNIFER MENA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tijuana is fighting its image as a lawless border town from the street up. Literally. For the last two months, the Mexican city has begun to move slowly toward enforcing a series of new traffic laws designed to tame a free-wheeling and often dangerous driving culture. A phalanx of new police officers has been deployed to enforce the new road rules, some of which are tougher than those north of the border. Talking on a cell phone while driving is prohibited.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 2001 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Martin Rodriguez and thousands of other Tijuana residents cross the international border for the most mundane of reasons: to check their mail. Twice a week or more, Rodriguez, a 43-year-old construction worker, checks his rented box at a private mail center a short walk north of the border crossing at San Ysidro. He and other border denizens, many of whom work legally on the U.S. side and have families and lifestyles that straddle the divide, prefer the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 2001 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's no foreign service job quite like it. At the U.S. Consulate in Tijuana, death and disorder are daily fare, and diplomacy is conducted more often at the jailhouse than at fancy official soirees. So it is not surprising that this consulate comes in for its share of criticism. In recent years, a spate of serious incidents involving U.S. citizens in Baja have redoubled complaints of bureaucratic indifference and inaction.
NEWS
November 10, 2000 | From a Times Staff Writer
A controversial proposal to treat cross-border sewage from Mexico at a for-profit plant in Tijuana has been signed into law by President Clinton. Overflow sewage from Tijuana is a long-standing problem on the border, where millions of gallons flow into the U.S. via the Tijuana River or spill into the Pacific Ocean. "No other members of Congress have raw sewage flowing into their districts from another country," said Rep. Bob Filner (D-San Diego), who sponsored the measure with Rep.
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