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BUSINESS
June 25, 2012 | By Ricardo Lopez
Losing your company $2 billion apparently causes investors to respect you less, according to a recent survey conducted by Barron's. After an investment group within JPMorgan was found to have lost $2 billion in trading, the bank's listing on Barron's annual survey dropped to 49th this year from 14th last year. After the loss, JPMorgan's chief executive apologized for the risky trading before a congressional committee. Apple again took the top spot, even after its leadership changed when Steve Jobs died last fall.
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BUSINESS
September 12, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Apple.com might be giving away some of Tim Cook's announcements planned for Wednesday, according to multiple reports. Nine to 5 Mac is saying that you can see some of what Apple has planned for its announcement Wednesday if you use the search function on the company's website. Among the secrets being divulged is the name of the next iPhone, which seems like it will be called the iPhone 5. Rumor roundup: The new iPhone If you go to this link , you can see various search results for the term "iPhone 5" that include a couple of URLs with the name in them.
BUSINESS
October 30, 2012 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO - In the biggest management shake-up since Tim Cook took the helm, Apple has ousted two top executives blamed for a pair of embarrassing missteps. Apple Inc. said Scott Forstall, its longtime executive and a protege of co-founder Steve Jobs, was leaving the company. As head of the mobile software division, Forstall oversaw the iOS operating system that runs the best-selling iPhone and iPad that together account for the bulk of Apple's sales. But the 15-year Apple veteran also was responsible for one of the company's highest-profile gaffes: replacing Google Inc.'s maps with Apple's own faulty mapping software.
BUSINESS
September 23, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Apple this weekend shattered its record for iPhone sales, but customers looking for the iPhone 5c are in luck: There are still plenty of devices available for purchase. The Cupertino, Calif.-based tech company announced Monday morning that it sold more than 9 million new iPhones around the world, breaking the mark it set last year and blowing past the expectations of many analysts. Sure enough, all those sales led to some units selling out. The gold version of the iPhone 5s, for example, quickly sold out at various locations across the country early Friday morning, and since then, all versions of the iPhone 5s have been harder to find.
BUSINESS
September 21, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien
During the iPhone announcement event at Apple's headquarters last week, chief executive Tim Cook took a few minutes to plug a project that hadn't gotten as much attention as the company's new gadgets or iOS 7. On the screen behind him on the stage, Cook flashed a picture of the company's new store at the Stanford Shopping Center. "This month, our attention turns home," Cook said. Photos: Top 11 hidden, cool features in Apple's iOS 7   The company had previously had a small, 1,100-square-foot store at the Stanford mall.  "Despite the size of it, our teams have served 5 million customers there, in just nine years," Cook said.
BUSINESS
September 28, 2012 | By Michael Hiltzik
Is Apple losing its grip? Most people asking that question are referring to the maps app that comes bundled with iPhone 5. The app, which is Apple's attempt to wean its users off a superb map program created by its archrivals at Google, is a spectacular flop, the NFL replacement ref of the software world. It's so bad that Apple chief executive Tim Cook has issued a formal apology  for it. But when will Cook apologize for the disaster that is Lion upgrade 10.7.5? That's an upgrade to the operating system I installed, unwisely, on my iMac desktop, a superb performer on which I haven't lost 10 minutes of work since I acquired it in mid-2010.
BUSINESS
August 25, 2011 | By Walter Hamilton, Dawn Chmielewski and David Sarno, Los Angeles Times
Steve Jobs, the visionary co-founder of Apple Inc. and driving force behind a string of products that revolutionized the consumer-electronics industry, stepped down as chief executive but was named chairman of the board, the company said late Wednesday. His relinquishing of daily control had been widely anticipated since he took an extended medical leave earlier this year. Jobs, 56, had a liver transplant two years ago and underwent surgery for pancreatic cancer seven years ago. Photos: Steve Jobs and Apple's influence "I have always said if there ever came a day when I could no longer meet my duties and expectations as Apple's CEO, I would be the first to let you know," he wrote in a letter to the board Wednesday.
BUSINESS
March 27, 2014 | Chris O'Brien
Officially, the Microsoft press conference Thursday in San Francisco was intended to take the wraps off the long-awaited version of its Office for iPad. While it's a big deal, it was also the first public appearance of Satya Nadella since becoming Microsoft chief executive this year. And that, as much as a product launch, was what drew dozens of reporters to a Microsoft office in the city.  Nadella, dressed in a snug, black T-shirt and speaking comfortably in front of a series of big monitors, said the event was the first in a series of opportunities he would take to begin laying out his vision for where he wants to take Microsoft.  "Our customers want to know where we're going and what is our innovation agenda," he said.  Broadly speaking, that strategy is "mobile-first, cloud-first.
NEWS
July 24, 2012 | By Jon Healey
Here's one aspect of Steve Jobs' legacy that Tim Cook, his successor at the helm of Apple, must be hating Wednesday: the company's reputation for lowballing its sales and profit estimates. The company found itself in the odd position of reporting better results than it had projected -- and, more objectively, higher quarterly sales and profits than the year before -- yet having its stock hammered in after-hours trading. Why? Because analysts had predicted much higher sales and profits, and thus were surprised and disappointed.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2012 | By Joe Bel Bruno
Apple's stock barely budged after the technology giant unveiled the iPhone 5, which it bills as the world's thinnest smartphone. Investors seemed to shrug off the announcement -- but that's not entirely shocking. Apple shares have, on average, fallen 1.4% the day the company launched all of the previous incarnations of the iPhone, according to Morgan Stanley. PHOTOS: Apple iPhone 5 The investment bank said the week after Apple announcements haven't been all that hot either.
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