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BUSINESS
June 25, 2012 | By Ricardo Lopez
Losing your company $2 billion apparently causes investors to respect you less, according to a recent survey conducted by Barron's. After an investment group within JPMorgan was found to have lost $2 billion in trading, the bank's listing on Barron's annual survey dropped to 49th this year from 14th last year. After the loss, JPMorgan's chief executive apologized for the risky trading before a congressional committee. Apple again took the top spot, even after its leadership changed when Steve Jobs died last fall.
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BUSINESS
September 23, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Put down your friend's iPhone 5s. You have no idea what's been touching it. The latest Apple iPhone went on sale Friday and one of its signature highlights is a new fingerprint scanner built into the home button at the bottom of the device. The feature, called Touch ID, lets users quickly unlock their device while keeping others out. It can also be used to verify purchases. VIDEO CHAT: Unboxing the iPhone 5s But some Apple users are very strange and creative, and have quickly taken to YouTube and Twitter to confirm that users can scan and unlock the iPhone 5s using more than just fingerprints.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien
Apple's retail stores have been a phenomenon over the last decade, a cornerstone of the company's revival. But with some changes in leadership over the last year, there have been questions about the direction of Apple's retail strategy. During his appearance at the Goldman Sachs technology conference Tuesday, Apple chief executive Tim Cook reemphasized how crucial the stores remain to Apple. And he discussed the company's expansion plans for its stores by noting that they were becoming so popular, their capacity was being strained by the number of visitors.  QUIZ: Test y our Apple knowledge "Some of our stores aren't big enough," Cook said.
BUSINESS
October 5, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
An essential element of the Tim-Cook-Is-Not-Steve-Jobs meme is that its proponents have no idea about (1) who Steve Jobs was, and (2) how Apple performed under his leadership. An excellent example of the form is buried within Fred Vogelstein's article about Apple's iPhone appearing in this weekend's New York Times Magazine. Vogelstein commits a drive-by assault on Cook with this passage: "When Jobs died in October 2011, the prevailing question wasn't whether Tim Cook could succeed him, but whether  anyone  could.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Apple.com might be giving away some of Tim Cook's announcements planned for Wednesday, according to multiple reports. Nine to 5 Mac is saying that you can see some of what Apple has planned for its announcement Wednesday if you use the search function on the company's website. Among the secrets being divulged is the name of the next iPhone, which seems like it will be called the iPhone 5. Rumor roundup: The new iPhone If you go to this link , you can see various search results for the term "iPhone 5" that include a couple of URLs with the name in them.
BUSINESS
October 30, 2012 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO - In the biggest management shake-up since Tim Cook took the helm, Apple has ousted two top executives blamed for a pair of embarrassing missteps. Apple Inc. said Scott Forstall, its longtime executive and a protege of co-founder Steve Jobs, was leaving the company. As head of the mobile software division, Forstall oversaw the iOS operating system that runs the best-selling iPhone and iPad that together account for the bulk of Apple's sales. But the 15-year Apple veteran also was responsible for one of the company's highest-profile gaffes: replacing Google Inc.'s maps with Apple's own faulty mapping software.
NEWS
April 23, 2013 | By Peter Pae
Apple's stock is on a tear following the electronics giant's announcement it would buy back $60 billion in stock and boost its dividend 15% to $3.05 a share. The huge buyback plan and dividend increase eclipsed a somewhat disappointing second-quarter earnings report in which profit dipped for the first time in a decade. The company also forecast that its earnings in the current quarter would be lower. Apple shares are up more than $20 to $426.79 in after-hours trading. The stock closed at $406.13, up $7.64, in regular trading.
BUSINESS
September 28, 2012 | By Michael Hiltzik
Is Apple losing its grip? Most people asking that question are referring to the maps app that comes bundled with iPhone 5. The app, which is Apple's attempt to wean its users off a superb map program created by its archrivals at Google, is a spectacular flop, the NFL replacement ref of the software world. It's so bad that Apple chief executive Tim Cook has issued a formal apology  for it. But when will Cook apologize for the disaster that is Lion upgrade 10.7.5? That's an upgrade to the operating system I installed, unwisely, on my iMac desktop, a superb performer on which I haven't lost 10 minutes of work since I acquired it in mid-2010.
BUSINESS
March 27, 2014 | By Chris O'Brien
Officially, the Microsoft press conference Thursday in San Francisco was intended to take the wraps off the long-awaited version of its Office for iPad. While it's a big deal, it was also the first public appearance of Satya Nadella since becoming Microsoft chief executive this year. And that, as much as a product launch, was what drew dozens of reporters to a Microsoft office in the city.  Nadella, dressed in a snug, black T-shirt and speaking comfortably in front of a series of big monitors, said the event was the first in a series of opportunities he would take to begin laying out his vision for where he wants to take Microsoft.  "Our customers want to know where we're going and what is our innovation agenda," he said.  Broadly speaking, that strategy is "mobile-first, cloud-first.
NEWS
July 24, 2012 | By Jon Healey
Here's one aspect of Steve Jobs' legacy that Tim Cook, his successor at the helm of Apple, must be hating Wednesday: the company's reputation for lowballing its sales and profit estimates. The company found itself in the odd position of reporting better results than it had projected -- and, more objectively, higher quarterly sales and profits than the year before -- yet having its stock hammered in after-hours trading. Why? Because analysts had predicted much higher sales and profits, and thus were surprised and disappointed.
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