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BUSINESS
October 11, 2011 | By Nathan Olivarez-Giles, Los Angeles Times
Steve Jobs died of respiratory arrest and a pancreatic tumor, according to his death certificate released Monday. The Apple Inc. co-founder and chairman died around 3 p.m. Wednesday in his Palo Alto home, the certificate noted. Apple and Jobs' family announced his death Wednesday but did not provide details about the time, place or cause. Jobs resigned as Apple chief executive Aug. 24. He had been diagnosed in 2003 with a neuroendocrine tumor on his pancreas, and he underwent a liver transplant in 2009.
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BUSINESS
September 12, 2012 | By Joe Bel Bruno
Apple's stock barely budged after the technology giant unveiled the iPhone 5, which it bills as the world's thinnest smartphone. Investors seemed to shrug off the announcement -- but that's not entirely shocking. Apple shares have, on average, fallen 1.4% the day the company launched all of the previous incarnations of the iPhone, according to Morgan Stanley. PHOTOS: Apple iPhone 5 The investment bank said the week after Apple announcements haven't been all that hot either.
BUSINESS
November 16, 2011 | By David Sarno, Los Angeles Times
In the first change to Apple's leadership since the death of Steve Jobs last month, the company announced that Walt Disney Co. President and Chief Executive Robert Iger would be the Cupertino, Calif., electronics maker's newest board member. At the same time, Genentech Inc. Chairman Arthur Levinson, an Apple board member since 2005, will become the company's non-executive chairman, filling the role Jobs occupied briefly after his resignation as Apple's chief executive in August.
BUSINESS
July 24, 2012 | By Joe Bel Bruno
Apple Inc. under the leadership of Steve Jobs was never known for giving particularly good guidance to Wall Street when it came to how much the tech giant might earn. Things appear to have gotten a whole lot uglier under Tim Cook. There are 42 analysts that track Apple's stock, and every single one of them got it wrong. Apple turned in third-quarter earnings of $9.32 a share. Analysts' estimates were for $10.37, with the lowest projection coming in at $9.45 and the highest at $12.51.
BUSINESS
September 23, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien
Owners of Apple devices have been upgrading to the radically redesigned iOS 7 that was released last Wednesday faster than any previous version. Apple reported Monday that 200 million iOS devices are running the new operating system. The company likes to tout the fact that the vast majority of its customers use the latest version of its mobile operating system. Apple argues that makes its experience superior to Android devices, which tend to be more fragmented with many running on much older versions of the Google operating system.  PHOTOS: Top 11 hidden, cool features in Apple's iOS 7 According to statistics from Fiksu , a mobile analysts firm, more than 50% of all iOS devices have  upgraded to iOS 7. Indeed, the rush to upgrade last Wednesday led to long waits and error messages for many users who apparently overwhelmed Apple's servers.  The Fiksu report says that at this same point, less than 40% of users had upgraded to iOS 6, and less than 30% had upgraded to iOS 5.  The percentages are even more impressive considering there are far more devices running iOS than there were two years ago.  With Apple also announcing it sold a record 9 million new iPhones during the first weekend, investors sent the company's stock up $17.67 or 3.78% to $ 485.08.
BUSINESS
December 30, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
While Apple and Microsoft saw their share of laptops sold to businesses and other organizations in the U.S. decrease in 2013, Google dramatically increased its portion of sales. From January through November, Google sold 1.76 million Chromebook laptops in the U.S., up from 400,000 during the same period in 2012, according to a recent report by NPD Group . that tracked sales through commercial channels. That includes devices that were sold to businesses, government agencies, schools and other organizations.
BUSINESS
August 7, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Along with the news that there would not be a native YouTube app on iOS 6, Apple injected some humor -- a very unusual move for the Cupertino, Calif., company -- and "Rickrolled" its developers in a recent change log for its next mobile operating system. As you might know, Rickrolling is emailing someone a link that claims to go to a particular website but actually sends them to a YouTube video of Rick Astley's 1987 song "Never Gonna Give You Up. " In this instance, Apple was explaining the proper way to embed videos in iOS 6 and used the Rickroll as its example.
NATIONAL
April 16, 2014 | By David Horsey
A beginning elementary school teacher in a small district in California makes around $40,000 per year. That's 2 or 3 thousand dollars more than poor Larry Ellison brings in -- but Ellison, the CEO of Oracle Corp., earns it in an hour. There's nothing that illustrates the vast and growing wealth gap in America more starkly than a list of the incomes enjoyed by the top business executives in the country. A new study done for the New York Times found that pay for the 100 top CEOs jumped 9% from 2012 to 2013, raising their median annual compensation to nearly $14 million.
BUSINESS
February 1, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien
[This post has been  updated .] The panel at Macworld was called "The State of Apple 2013. " But it could just as well have been called "In Defense of Apple. "  The Friday afternoon panel was moderated by Macworld senior editor Dan Moren and gathered four panelists he described as Apple fans. The group included Ryan Block, co-founder of the blog gdgt ; Christina Bonnington, a Wired writer; Jacqui Cheng, a senior editor at Ars Technica ; and John Gruber, who writes the influential Daring Fireball blog.
BUSINESS
December 29, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez and Deborah Netburn
As 2012 comes to a close we take a look back at the biggest "oops" moments of the last year. Whether it was an advertising misstep (Facebook's "Chair" commercial), or a product released before it was ready (Apple Maps), or just an idea that was ill-received (homeless men as Wi-Fi hotspots), we tried to compose a list of the times when the major players lost control of the narrative.  It's also a reminder that everyone makes mistakes--even exacting tech companies.  1. Apple Maps fiasco How bad was it when Apple replaced Google Maps with its own mapping system on iOS 6?
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