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Tim Richmond

SPORTS
August 24, 1989 | Associated Press
Stock car driver Tim Richmond contracted AIDS from an unknown woman and died of complications caused by the disease, a physician close to the driver's family said Wednesday. "There's no way of knowing who that woman was," David W. Dodson said at a news conference. "Tim was a celebrity with a lot of charisma--a handsome guy. He naturally attracted a lot of women."
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SPORTS
February 12, 1988 | SHAV GLICK
A large dose of a prescription drug, not an illegal drug, caused race car driver Tim Richmond to test positive in his substance abuse test last week, NASCAR officials said Thursday night. "Pseudoephedrine, a drug normally used for allergies and respiratory conditions, was found in the urine sample submitted by Tim Richmond on Thursday, Feb. 4," said a report from NASCAR drug adviser Dr. Forest S. Tennant, who tested Richmond's urine samples.
SPORTS
February 23, 1990
Dr. Forest Tennant is no longer working for NASCAR as its drug adviser, a spokesman for the premier stock car sanctioning body said Thursday in Daytona Beach, Fla. Tennant is the executive director of Community Health Projects, Inc., a group of drug-treatment clinics headquartered in West Covina.
SPORTS
November 13, 1986 | JIM MURRAY
Tim Richmond is a motorist who has logged more than 200,000 miles in the last few years without ever seeing Mount Rushmore, Mount Vernon, Old Faithful, a Canadian sunset, Hoover Dam or either Disneyland. He's never had to stop and say, "Excuse me, which way's the Grand Canyon?" or, "Wasn't Lincoln born around here someplace?" He never had to stop to let the kids go to the bathroom.
SPORTS
February 14, 1988 | SHAV GLICK
The dispute between Tim Richmond and NASCAR will have to wait until after today's Daytona 500. Because the controversial driver did not practice in a Winston Cup car during the week, he is not eligible to drive today, even as a backup driver. Richmond, who tested positive in a NASCAR drug-substance test Feb. 5 and then tested negative in a similar test several days later, held a press conference at his hotel Saturday and again said he was innocent in the drug controversy.
SPORTS
September 8, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
Tim Richmond continued his assault on the Winston Cup points championship Sunday, taking the lead with 50 laps left and coasting to victory in the Wrangler Jeans Indigo 400 NASCAR race at Richmond, Va. The victory, Richmond's sixth of the season, moved him into second place in the season point standings behind Dale Earnhardt, who finished in second place. Darrell Waltrip, second in the Winston Cup chase before the race, retired with engine trouble after 61 laps and was last in the 29-car field.
SPORTS
February 24, 1990 | ELLIOTT ALMOND and JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Dr. Forest Tennant, who for more than a month has been at the center of controversy regarding his drug-testing methods and credibility, Friday resigned as the NFL's drug adviser. The NFL issued a four-paragraph statement here saying Tennant, a West Covina drug-treatment expert, cited his many non-NFL commitments as a reason for his stepping down. Commissioner Paul Tagliabue accepted the resignation, effective April 1.
SPORTS
February 21, 1990 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Late in 1986, stock car driver Tim Richmond was hospitalized for pneumonia. But, as he soon discovered, that was secondary to a more serious illness: He was diagnosed with AIDS, the acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Richmond, 31 at the time, did not want to quit racing. And he did not. He was named NASCAR's driver of the year for 1986, and planned to continue driving for as long as his strength would last. But it was not AIDS that knocked him out of racing.
SPORTS
June 22, 1987 | SHAV GLICK, Times Staff Writer
Fun-loving Tim Richmond, who lives life on the ragged edge, drove the same way Sunday to continue his remarkable comeback from a serious illness. Driving a new Chevrolet Monte Carlo prepared by Harry Hyde for car owner Rick Hendrick, Richmond finished two seconds ahead of Ricky Rudd to win the Budweiser 400 NASCAR race at Riverside International Raceway.
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