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Tim Robbins

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January 17, 2004 | Don Shirley
"Embedded," Tim Robbins' satirical comedy inspired by events in Iraq, will move from the Actors' Gang in Hollywood to the New York Public Theater, with previews beginning Feb. 24. An opening date has not yet been set. Meanwhile, "Caroline, or Change," the Tony Kushner and Jeanine Tesori music drama, will move from the Public Theater to Broadway in the spring, opening May 2 -- in time for consideration for Tony Awards. -- Don Shirley
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2014 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Eva Amurri Martino, the actress daughter of Susan Sarandon, is pregnant with her first child! “Having a family has always been a priority for us both and we couldn't be happier!,” the couple said in confirming the news to People . The baby's daddy is husband Kyle Martino, a former soccer star who married his gal in October 2011, with Sarandon and former partner Tim Robbins hosting the occasion. "Ecstatic bout the new addition to our tribe," Sarandon said on Twitter , posting a link to People's they're-expecting story.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2008 | Lynn Smith, Times Staff Writer
Tim Robbins was somewhere in red-state country last year shooting the film "The Lucky Ones" when a serviceman approached him in a bar. "One would think it wouldn't be safe for me to be in situations in areas like that," said the actor and political activist who still burns over the names he was called -- "traitor," "Saddam lover," "terrorist supporter"-- after he made some antiwar remarks back in 2003. But experience told him that the soldier, an Iraq veteran, would probably just want to talk.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2014 | By Greg Braxton
"Shogun," "The Winds of War," "Game of Thrones" and "Under the Dome" are just a few titles in the library of highly regarded novels that have been adapted for television. And then there's "The Spoils of Babylon," the sprawling 22-hour miniseries with an all-star cast based on the massive novel by self-proclaimed "undisputed master of dramatic fiction" Eric Jonrosh. Filmed during the 1970s when "novels for television" were all the rage, "The Spoils of Babylon" revolved around the oil-rich Morehouse family and was packed with scenes of betrayal, greed and forbidden love.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2007
I'm looking forward to Ian McKellen in "King Lear." I am interested to see the profound fall from dignity of Lear performed by an actor who personifies integrity and grace and courage whenever I have seen him on the stage. I am also a slave to the abounding sounds of Arcade Fire, the poetic and visceral performances of John Doe and Steve Earle and the anarchy and danger of M.I.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1988 | ROBERT KOEHLER
One of the great by-products of federally funded theater during the days of Franklin Roosevelt was the Living Newspaper. This was theater as timely as the morning headlines, from which writers plucked ideas. Ask director-writer-actor Tim Robbins about the Living Newspaper, now a receding moment in American stage history, and he'll plead ignorance. But he's pleased to learn that others, 50 years ago, were doing what he and his ensemble, the Actors' Gang, are in part doing today.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 1996 | FRANK LOVECE, NEWSDAY
The title is probably a tip-off, but "Dead Man Walking" is not the feel-good movie of the year. With deliberate anti-sensationalism, it peels back the day-to-day details and day-to-doom emotions of a death row inmate and the nun who becomes his state-supplied spiritual advisor. And unlike "Murder in the First," the condemned man doesn't get a hooker in his cell.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1992 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
How do you follow a string of high-profile projects such as starring in the critically acclaimed film "The Player," directing, writing and starring in another movie, "Bob Roberts," and hosting "Saturday Night Live"? When you're Tim Robbins, one of the hottest commodities in Hollywood, everyone's watching your next move. Well, the next move may come as a surprise. The 34-year-old Robbins ventures into new and unlikely territory today: writing, starring in and co-directing a satirical radio drama.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 2001 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In four to six shows a week since Oct. 11, the Actors' Gang company has been exploring on stage the role of the theater in society. For 20 years, the same company has been experimenting offstage with the role of democracy in the theater. In both cases, the results look mixed at the moment--but difficult to ignore. And in both cases, the results have much to do with Tim Robbins, the company's once-and-again artistic director, principal benefactor and resident movie star.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1999 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Tim Robbins is tired. Make that exhausted. Not even staying at the most exclusive hotel in the south of France, apparently, guarantees you a good night's sleep. "There was a wild party here yesterday, breaking glass and everything," the actor-filmmaker says, coping with his breakfast on the pristine terrace of the now-tranquil Hotel du Cap. "People were in the hallway in front of our door, yelling and screaming, it was insane. And I thought this place would be quiet."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
The love games of Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's Dream" are as frolicsome as they are exquisitely patterned. Of all his romantic comedies, this one has the structural elegance of an elaborate dance. The play has flashes of magnificent poetry, but it's the way the action is choreographed that Shakespeare's genius most fully reveals itself. The Actors' Gang production of "Midsummer," directed by company chief Tim Robbins, strips the play down to its bare essentials. There are no sets to speak of, the lighting is often stark and the special effects tend to involve nothing more than plastic foliage and billowing sheets.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2013 | By David Ng
Actor-director Tim Robbins and guitarist Wayne Kramer were among a handful of local cultural leaders to voice their support on Friday for programs that bring the arts to prisons and other correctional facilities around the country.  The event was a hearing in downtown Los Angeles intended to address the efficacy of the arts as a rehabilitative tool in the correctional system. The discussion, held at the Grammy Museum at L.A Live, was moderated by California state Sen. Curren Price, who serves as chairman of the joint committee on the arts.  Robbins voiced his concern that state policies emphasizing inmate labor has made it difficult for many to attend arts sessions.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2012 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
The night after the first preview of "Oy," a two-character play about the Holocaust that he directed for the Actors' Gang theater, French actor and director Georges Bigot arrived for an interview at the Culver City theater looking tired and bleary-eyed. He apologized - there had been a "celebration" after the performance. Bigot had only a few hours before he flew home to Paris. Cellphones in each of his pants pockets occasionally interrupted the proceedings as did the cacophony emanating from the stage where a summer camp for teenage actors was taking place.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2011 | By Keith Thursby, Los Angeles Times
Gil Robbins, a musician and actor who was a member of the 1960s folk group the Highwaymen, died Tuesday at his home in Mexico, said his son, actor-director Tim Robbins. He was 80 and had prostate cancer. "He was very charming, open and funny," Tim Robbins told The Times on Saturday. "He had a real strong moral center; he spoke up for what he believed in. " In 1962, Gil Robbins joined the Highwaymen, best known for "Michael," their recording of "Michael, Row the Boat Ashore.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2010 | By Chris Lee, Los Angeles Times
— Inside a dingy community room at the California Rehabilitation Center , the prisoners were segregated into two distinct populations. Members from one group awaited their cue behind a "curtain" — an old bed sheet strung from the ceiling. The other group sat in folding chairs waiting to take the "stage. " All wore garish greasepaint to variously resemble mimes or clowns, Kabuki performers or horror movie antiheroes. And all had been kitted out with funny hats, prop glasses and fake mustaches to whimsical effect.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2010 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
To begin with, there was a reading assignment. Tim Robbins, actor and founder of the Actors' Gang, had long admired "A People's History of the United States," the 1980 revisionist history book by the late Howard Zinn that tells America's story from the perspective of have-nots rather than big shots. Robbins asked all 60 or so Actors' Gang members to read its sections on Christopher Columbus, Jamestown and pre-revolutionary Boston; then they began to explore the dramatic possibilities in a series of workshops last summer that he hoped would point toward a play.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1999 | JOHN CLARK
"I don't know if you noticed, but there were a couple of psychos in the crowd the other day," says Tim Robbins, referring to a protest scene he staged in New York City for his new movie, "Cradle Will Rock." Robbins, who is directing but not appearing in this film, is standing in the middle of 156th Street on the West Side of Manhattan, surrounded by camera crew and equipment. "They'd run into the shot dressed in period clothes and do all sorts of things," he says.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1992 | ELAINE DUTKA
Tim Robbins is, hands-down, Hollywood's Man of the Hour--not only the recipient of the best actor award at the Cannes Film Festival for "The Player" but the director, writer and star of "Bob Roberts"--a biting pseudo-documentary about a right-wing folksinger running for political office that has the town abuzz long in advance of its September release.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2009 | Dennis Lim
Samuel Fuller was a director with a signature style: blunt verging on brutal, partial to shock cuts and mega close-ups. As a screenwriter, this former crime reporter was no less distinctive, favoring hot-button issues and hard-boiled repartee. A superb new seven-disc set, "The Samuel Fuller Collection" ($79.95, Sony, out Tuesday), which contains two films written and directed by Fuller and five earlier efforts on which he has a writing or story credit, is an intriguing auteurist study that shows the Fuller personality both as the driving force of a film and as an (often powerful)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2009 | Reed Johnson
Tim Robbins jokes that he could've given the title "While Rome Burns" to his new festival at the Actors' Gang. Times are tough, people are angry, "and they have every right to be," says the Oscar-winning actor and artistic director of the Culver City-based theater company. "There've been really bad decisions made that we're paying the bill for now." Like most cultural entities, the Gang, one of L.A.'s most accomplished theatrical institutions, has been scorched financially by the economic crisis.
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