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OPINION
December 8, 1991
For a time, California's timber wars threatened to last longer than the ancient forests over which they were fought. Now, like so many of the redwoods that sparked these battles, the skirmishes may be gone forever. What should put an end to them is Gov. Pete Wilson's announcement last week that he wants to achieve most--if not all--of the goals of a forest-protection bill he vetoed in October. But getting a new bill through the Legislature may take more than good intentions.
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NATIONAL
March 6, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
Snow, sleet and frozen rain damaged a year's worth of South Carolina's timber harvest last month, making it the most damaging storm in the region since 1989, officials reported. About 11% of the forestland was significantly affected by the pre-Valentine's Day storm, which left an inch of ice across half of the state. Though most of the $360 million in damage was considered “light” by the South Carolina Forestry Commission because some of it could be salvaged, the agency declared a disaster and called on timber companies Wednesday to save as much as they could.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2010 | By Margot Roosevelt, Los Angeles Times
California regulators Thursday voted to cap the greenhouse gas emissions of the state's major industries and establish the nation's first broad-based carbon trading program. The move marks another bellwether moment for a state that has led in environmental policy, coming as national climate legislation to regulate greenhouse gases and curb climate change has stalled in Congress. "This is an historic venture," said Mary Nichols, chairwoman of the California Air Resources Board, as the panel voted 9 to 1 to approve some 3,000 pages of regulations and supporting documents, crafted over three years of intense negotiations with businesses and public interest groups.
BUSINESS
March 15, 2013 | By Shan Li
Even before dawn breaks, workers at the lumberyard in Lynwood were bustling around, getting a move on the day. Men in yellow safety vests drove flatbed trucks stacked to the brim with planks of wood. Others were buzzing around in forklifts, ferrying more boards. It's a scene that had John Cencak smiling in satisfaction and relief. After years of anxiously waiting for the economy to rebound, the vice president of Jones Wholesale Lumber Cos. was seeing an upswing. "You see this new truck?"
OPINION
June 11, 2003
Re "Forest Service Plan Would Triple Logging Limits in Sierra," June 6: The U.S. Forest Service's plan for increasing logging limits is a thinly veiled smokescreen to benefit timber companies under the guise of a wrongheaded wildfire management plan. Rather than ask logging companies to groom our forests by removing small trees and natural brush, government officials need to acknowledge the wealth of data that supports fire's necessary role in maintaining the biodiversity in fire-dependent ecosystems.
NATIONAL
March 6, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
Snow, sleet and frozen rain damaged a year's worth of South Carolina's timber harvest last month, making it the most damaging storm in the region since 1989, officials reported. About 11% of the forestland was significantly affected by the pre-Valentine's Day storm, which left an inch of ice across half of the state. Though most of the $360 million in damage was considered “light” by the South Carolina Forestry Commission because some of it could be salvaged, the agency declared a disaster and called on timber companies Wednesday to save as much as they could.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2001
In an April 17 editorial on the expiration of the U.S.-Canada softwood lumber agreement, The Times argues that the claim of unfair Canadian subsidies for lumber has been made three times in the last 20 years and never succeeded. Over the past 15 years, the Commerce Department twice determined that stumpage programs in Canada constituted unfair subsidies. These determinations were then overruled by binational panels, with three Canadians outvoting two Americans each time. The Canadian government grossly subsidizes its timber exports.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1989
Albert Einstein said many years ago that he saw two things as infinite: God's wisdom and human folly. This truth was never more apparent than in the sawmill operators' protest against preserving some of the last remaining acres of natural forest. It's important that people understand that the dispute isn't over privately owned timber land--it's over destroying old growth on our land, in the national forests. Many years ago, all the best timber land was given to private operators--only the dregs went into our national forests.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1988
As your story on the congressional budget mess noted, too few legislators are willing to vote for cuts that may be painful (Part I, Jan. 26). But here's a program that should be easy to cut: the subsidized logging on our national forests. From 1982 to 1986, the U.S. lost at least $1.2 billion on timber sales because the money paid by giant timber companies did not always cover the costs of road building, timber surveys, and other Forest Service overhead. The most egregious example is logging on the Tongass National Forest in Southeast Alaska, a rare rain forest where taxpayers are losing 99 cents on every dollar spent, to the tune of about $50 million a year.
BUSINESS
June 24, 1989 | From United Press International
A $10,000 reward has been posted by a southern Oregon timber company hoping to find whoever drove several 8-inch-long metal spikes into trees cut on a disputed timber sale, causing damage to sawmill equipment. "You're playing with dynamite in cases like this," Buck Mehl, general manager of Gregory Forest Products Co. in Glendale, said Friday, eight days after the first of about 20 spikes began turning up in logs at the company's mill. No injuries have occurred, but some saw blades were damaged when they struck the spikes, Mehl said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 2012 | By Michael J. Mishak, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - When Gov. Jerry Brown spoke to a crowd of beaming environmentalists and renewable energy advocates at the launch of a solar farm last year, he turned heads by praising another form of fuel: oil. It was a surprising pivot from the man credited with helping to usher in the modern environmental movement as California's governor nearly four decades ago. Back then, Brown enacted the nation's first energy-efficiency standards, signed strict...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2012 | By Chris Megerian, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO — California consumers will pay a new tax to fund government oversight of the state's vast timber industry under a bill signed by Gov. Jerry Brown on Tuesday, relieving logging companies of the cost. The measure also benefits the industry by restricting how much money government agencies can seek when suing for damages in wildfires caused by negligent practices. Federal prosecutors and members of President Obama's cabinet had fought the bill, which tightens the rules for tallying damages.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 2012 | By Chris Megerian, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO — Federal prosecutors Tuesday announced a record $122.5-million settlement for one of the most devastating wildfires in state history, which charred 65,000 acres in Northern California in 2007. The deal, which includes $55 million in cash and $67.5 million in land to be turned over to the federal government, is the result of a closely watched legal battle between federal prosecutors in Sacramento and Sierra Pacific Industries, the state's largest timber company. The case has been a flash point in a debate over how much money government agencies should be able to collect for damage in wildfires caused by negligence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2010 | By Margot Roosevelt, Los Angeles Times
California regulators Thursday voted to cap the greenhouse gas emissions of the state's major industries and establish the nation's first broad-based carbon trading program. The move marks another bellwether moment for a state that has led in environmental policy, coming as national climate legislation to regulate greenhouse gases and curb climate change has stalled in Congress. "This is an historic venture," said Mary Nichols, chairwoman of the California Air Resources Board, as the panel voted 9 to 1 to approve some 3,000 pages of regulations and supporting documents, crafted over three years of intense negotiations with businesses and public interest groups.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 2006 | Tim Reiterman, Times Staff Writer
The Schwarzenegger administration is poised to allow financially troubled Pacific Lumber Co. to remove special habitat protections on more than 2,000 acres covered by a historic agreement creating the Headwaters Preserve of ancient redwoods in Humboldt County. In exchange, Pacific Lumber has proposed placing the environmental restrictions on an equivalent amount of its land that company and wildlife officials say has superior conservation value.
NEWS
April 30, 2006 | Anjan Sundaram, Associated Press Writer
Pygmy chief Mbomba Bokenu says he may soon let loggers cut his people's forest, and all he expects in return is soap and a few bags of salt. "The Pygmies are suffering; we accept what we are given," said Bokenu, draped in brown civet-cat skins and holding a slender carved-wood shield. "Our children live in dirt, they suffer from disease. Soap and salt are a lot to our people."
BUSINESS
September 30, 1987 | Associated Press
The U.S. Forest Service plans to haul more than 1.3 billion board feet of timber out of California's charred forests and hold the biggest lumber salvage sale in state history. Ray Wienmann, timber manager for the National Forest Service, said about 85% of the 1.6 billion board feet of commercial trees killed in forest fires will be cut and sold--enough to build a city the size of San Francisco. A board foot measures one foot long, one foot wide and one inch thick.
BUSINESS
May 17, 2001 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anti-dumping penalties that could raise the price of imported Canadian softwood lumber--in turn boosting the cost of new U.S. homes--edged closer to reality Wednesday. The U.S. International Trade Commission ruled unanimously that there is a "reasonable indication" that U.S. timber interests have been hurt by unfair Canadian government subsidies. The ruling could lead to the imposition of duties on Canadian wood. The case is a thorn in U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2004 | Kenneth R. Weiss, Times Staff Writer
Humboldt County voters rallied behind their district attorney Tuesday, rejecting a campaign bankrolled by Pacific Lumber Co. to recall the prosecutor who had accused the powerful timber company of fraud. With all precincts reporting, voters decided to retain Dist. Atty. Paul Gallegos, 61% to 39%, despite an intensive campaign of radio, television and direct mail advertisements that portrayed Gallegos as soft on crime and a friend of illegal tree-sitters, rapists and pot growers.
OPINION
June 11, 2003
Re "Forest Service Plan Would Triple Logging Limits in Sierra," June 6: The U.S. Forest Service's plan for increasing logging limits is a thinly veiled smokescreen to benefit timber companies under the guise of a wrongheaded wildfire management plan. Rather than ask logging companies to groom our forests by removing small trees and natural brush, government officials need to acknowledge the wealth of data that supports fire's necessary role in maintaining the biodiversity in fire-dependent ecosystems.
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