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Time Machine

ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 1999 | TRACY JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Do you know what song is sung to the same tune as the ABCs? Or what makes a yo-yo go up and down and round and round? Well, if you don't know that "Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star" is the song and that centripetal force is what makes the yo-yo work, then a trip to the Children's Time Machine Edutainment Center might be in order.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1990 | CHRIS WILLMAN
What if you could go back in time and assassinate Hitler before he came to power? What if you could go back and kill Oswald before he assassinated Kennedy? What if you could go back and eliminate the CBS executives who canceled "The Twilight Zone"? These are the sorts of perennial questions that intrigue new generations of time-travel tale spinners.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 1997
The Richard Tufeld-voiced robot in "Lost in Space," while referred to as Robot in the series, did have a real name (" 'Lost in' Robot Names," Calendar Letters, Aug. 2). Its designated call letters were B9. Robby the Robot, who figured prominently in the MGM feature film "Forbidden Planet," was seen for years off and on in different television series, including "Lost in Space," in a first-season black-and-white episode called "War of the Robots." Robby played a malevolent robot who had dire designs on the Robinsons, but our robot buddy, B9, saved the day for the humans, though doing so might have meant its own demise.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2014 | By Meredith Blake
If “Mad Men” is a story of the '60s told from the perspective of those who “lost” the decade, then it's perfectly apt that the key line in the premiere of the show's final season comes from Richard Nixon, the man who championed the silent majority. In the closing minutes of “Time Zones,” Don shines his shoes as the new president delivers his inaugural address on television. One line from the speech stirs Don to attention: "We have found ourselves rich in goods but ragged in spirit.” Sound like anyone you know?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2001 | MARK SACHS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the series scoring its best ratings ever in this, its sixth season, it sometimes seems as if yes, "Everybody Loves Raymond." But even with the slam-dunk Top 10 finishes and the Emmys earlier this month for Patricia Heaton and Doris Roberts, some quibbles by avowed longtime viewers have begun surfacing on various Web sites.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2014 | By Mark Kellam
A Doritos commercial starring and cowritten by a Burbank resident was a cowinner of an annual contest sponsored by the snack company and it aired during the Super Bowl on Sunday. The ad follows a boy who has created a time machine as he tricks a neighbor, played by Burbank resident Daved Wilkins, into entering the contraption in a ploy to steal his Doritos. When the machine "takes off" using simple maneuvers created by the boy, Wilkins believe he's being transported into the future, the Burbank Leader reported . Wilkins worked on the 30-second spot with two longtime friends Ryan Thomas Andersen and Raj Suri, both of whom live in Phoenix.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
The routes American railroads follow were laid out almost exclusively in the 19th and 20th centuries, when trains were symbols of modernity and industrial power. And today, riding a train - especially in the United States - can feel like stepping into a time machine. Tom Zoellner enters this time machine again and again in his highly entertaining, lucid and perceptive travelogue "Train: Riding the Rails That Created the Modern World - From the Trans-Siberian to the Southwest Chief.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2008 | Susan King, King is a Times staff writer.
Spanish filmmaker Nacho Vigalondo describes his feature debut, "Timecrimes," as a toy -- "something the audience can play with." The award-winning film, which opens Friday, is a sci-fi thriller and a time-traveling film noir, with a dash of dark humor added for good measure. To wit: the movie's time machine, which resembles a giant egg. "We didn't want to make this beautiful time machine," says the 31-year-old Vigalondo, who also wrote and costars in the film.
NEWS
April 28, 1991 | ALICE KAHN
I spoke to "time" the other day. Well, actually the voice of time. You know, when you dial and hear, "At the tone, the time will be. . . . " You might have thought it was a computer or a little man locked in the Bureau of Time in Washington. But it's actually a woman in Atlanta named Joanne Daniels. She isn't the voice of all time. She's the voice of my time. But my time may not be your time. Daniels is the voice of time for California and New York.
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