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BUSINESS
March 8, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Facebook is bringing back F8, its conference for software developers in a bid to get them to create more and better mobile apps for the giant social network. The conference will be held April 30 in San Francisco, Ilya Sukhar, Parse chief executive and Facebook product manager, announced at SXSW on Saturday. F8 will return to its roots by focusing on technical content for mobile and Web developers, not on major announcements for Facebook users, Facebook said. The conference will feature hands-on workshops and technical sessions for about 1,500 developers to learn how to create, grow and make money from apps, the company said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2013 | By John Horn and Chris Lee
For pop culture aficionados, it's become a cherished ritual that must be observed around the biggest broadcast events: the TV drinking game. For Sunday's Hollywood edition, Times-sanctified enablers have gone beyond boozy suggestions and conjured up a list of prompts to maximize your  enjoyment of - while perhaps minimizing your sobriety during -- the 85th Academy Awards. FULL COVERAGE: Oscars 2013 | Top nominees Some suggestions ... * Every time Seth MacFarlane makes a self-serving reference to one of his TV shows or movies: Take a shot of cheap tequila.
NEWS
November 19, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times
Friday is World Toilet Day. It’s not about potty jokes but rather the importance of toilets and proper sanitation worldwide. The nonprofit World Toilet Organization estimates that, in the developing world, diarrheal diseases spread via feces kill more children than HIV/AIDS. Here ’s more information and statistics about the toll poor sanitation takes globally. But good bathroom hygiene isn’t a novel concept. This "toilet timeline" includes pictures of latrines from ancient Egyptian and Roman civilizations.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Rather than concentrate on the execution of the crime, this week's DVDs focus on what comes afterward: first the trial, then, for the unlucky, time behind bars. Nominated for seven Academy Awards, including best picture, 1959's “Anatomy of a Murder” is one of the great American courtroom dramas. Directed by Otto Preminger, it features Jimmy Stewart as a small-town lawyer defending Ben Gazzara against a murder charge brought by George C. Scott's hard-driving prosecutor. Archetypes don't get more archetypal than this, with a great Duke Ellington score thrown in for good measure.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2013 | By August Brown
Watching the Violent Femmes at Coachella is a kind of existential angst for a millennial guy. The trio's acoustic punk reveries on the Main Stage were perhaps the most articulate depiction of young male desire that any band could conjure for a twentysomething male. Sure, you can rage in the dance tent, or profess your affections in a smaller arena, but for real, uncut adolescent masculinity and its attendant frustrations, there is the Violent Femmes, and no one else. FULL COVERAGE: Coachella 2013  |  What to see and do Hearing them play "Add It Up" on the main stage is both a reminder and a warning: The world is big and wide and nothing can replace that first gasp of musical influence as a document of how to feel attraction.
BUSINESS
December 12, 2012 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- It's déjà vu all over again for Facebook privacy. Facebook says it's changing its privacy controls yet again to make them easier for users to understand. One of the new features: privacy shortcuts that pop up on the right-hand side at the top of News Feeds that answer questions such as “Who can see my stuff?” You can also block someone with one click. Facebook is also rolling out a feature that allows people to more easily hide or remove posts that appear on their Timeline.
BUSINESS
October 16, 2012 | By Jessica Guynn
LinkedIn just unveiled a sleek new look for profile pages that it hopes will get people to spend more time and come back more often. The professional network, dubbed "the anti-Facebook" with 175 million users and its shares trading at about $111, said the new design, which will roll out over the next few months, makes it easier for users to update their profiles and connect with others. It's all part of a push to fuel growth and engagement on LinkedIn. LinkedIn wants people to visit LinkedIn every day to stay in touch with their professional contacts, not just when they are job hunting, much the way people check Facebook each day for status updates from their friends.
BUSINESS
September 18, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Twitter introduced a feature similar to Facebook's "Cover Photo" that allows users to post a large personal picture to their profile page. It also updated the apps for using Twitter on mobile devices such as iPhones and iPads as well as phones running Android. Users can now add large photos that will appear above their tweets on their profile page, a feature Twitter is calling the "Header Photo. " But the Header Photo is hardly innovative. Facebook introduced something similar called the Cover Photo back when it announced its new Timeline profiles late last year.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
Dave Alvin and a slew of other veterans of the Southern California blues and roots music communities, including Junior Watson, James Harman and the Mike Eldred Trio, will gather Sunday at Café Fais Do Do in Los Angeles to salute harmonica ace John “Juke” Logan in a benefit for the American Institute for Cancer Research. Logan has been contending with esophageal cancer on and off since 2009, and proceeds from the show will be targeted toward research on that strain of cancer.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2013 | By Robert Abele
Swathed in gunmetal blues and grays and motored by a deliriously heaving pulp sensibility, the British gangsters-and-cops thriller "Welcome to the Punch" is derivative, dumb fun. Writer-director Eran Creevy shows himself to be well versed in the mythic sweep of Christopher Nolan's and Michael Mann's crime sagas, if not their intelligence with storytelling. Plotted like a British conspiracy miniseries (think "State of Play") that's been reduced to only the juiciest, silliest moments, it pits James McAvoy's dogged, renegade detective against Mark Strong's brooding criminal mastermind, and eventually the two together against a greater threat with - naturally - political connections.
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