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Times 125th Anniversary

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2006
Nov. 14, 1891: A business owner decided to test the city's parking regulations, The Times reported, under the headline "Will Make a Test Case; the Right to Tie Animals on the Street to Be Tested." "Ex-City Engineer Fred Eaton set rather a singular criminal case in motion before Justice Owens of the Police Court. Mr. Eaton sets forth in his complaint that two men named S.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 2006
Nov. 13, 1966: Gloria Parker, an employee in the Van Nuys post office, decided she wanted a more active career and applied to transfer to the post office near her Burbank home as the city's first female mail carrier. She was hired as a substitute, filling in for other carriers on their days off, The Times reported.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2006
Nov. 12, 1937: "More than 600 automobile owners have reported their cars damaged by the acid rain which followed aerial smoke screen maneuvers over the city by 12 Army planes ... and more complaints are coming in," The Times said. Major insurance firms met to assess the problem. S.H. Bucholtz of the Fire Companies Adjustment Bureau said: "The loss may total many thousands of dollars." The insurers said they would ask the government to pay for the claims.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 2006
Nov. 10, 1907: Sierra Madre held Cleaning-Up Day, "and it proved to be the greatest day in the history of the town," The Times reported.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 2006
Nov. 9, 1917: Los Angeles would supply more than 2,000 recruits for the U.S. Army's camouflage divisions, mostly "from the ranks of motion-picture scene painters and carpenters," The Times reported under the headline "They Fool You Every Day; Will They Fool the Germans?" Milton Moore, technical director of the Universal Film Co., told the newspaper, "We can build fake villages in 48 hours -- villages that we will defy an airman to detect.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 2006
Nov. 8, 1908: More and more tourists would soon be heading to California, The Times reported under the headline "Westward Turns Tourist Tide, Direction of Travel Toward Sunny California, Wealthy Easterners Will 'See' This State Rather Than 'Do' Europe." "That there is a general change in the disposition of wealthy tourists to give up going abroad and to spend some time in seeing the sights and enjoying the climate of their own country, is the report that O.L.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 2006
Nov. 7, 1991: "With an announcement that stunned the nation, Earvin 'Magic' Johnson, the brilliant guard who was the marquee name for the Lakers and the National Basketball Assn. for 12 years, retired ... saying he had tested positive for the virus that causes AIDS," The Times reported. "Johnson, 32, was characteristically upbeat when he made the announcement at a packed news conference at the Forum in Inglewood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2006
Nov. 6, 1910: A young man pulled an age-old scam in downtown Los Angeles, The Times reported under the headline "Old Game Revived, Slick Youth Gets Candy and Cash in Exchange for Paper That Has Color of Money." The loser in the deal was George B. Wilson, proprietor of a store at 6th and Figueroa streets. Wilson took a telephone call from a young man who "asked that a 50-cent box of candy and change for a $5 bill be sent to No. 354 S. Flower St.," the newspaper said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2006
Nov. 5, 1913: Forty-thousand people were on hand in the San Fernando Valley to witness the long-awaited moment when water from 200 miles away in the Owens Valley reached Los Angeles via the city's new aqueduct, The Times reported under the headline "Silver Torrent Crowns the City's Mighty Achievement."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 2006
Nov. 4, 1907: "Five of the most superlatively hungry men in the State of California" appeared in court "charged with the crime of sleeping in a boxcar," The Times reported. "The men were so hungry that they gazed with envy at a little boy who happened to be in the courtroom at the time chewing sugared crackers," the paper said. "Their story," The Times went on, "would have caused a bronze dog to weep bronze tears out of sympathy.
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