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Times 125th Anniversary

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 2006
Nov. 24, 1914: Twenty-one people -- 19 USC law students, a faculty member and a stenographer -- had "squeezed into an elevator" in the Tajo Building at 1st Street and Broadway when the cage "dropped five stories to the pit, 65 feet below," The Times reported. The accident occurred as students were "scrambling from a class in torts" and the elevator was "loaded far beyond its safety limit," the newspaper said. No one escaped injury, but none was killed.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2006
Nov. 22, 1963: This is the way Times columnist Jack Smith described a grieving Los Angeles on the day that President John F. Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas: "In the streets and sidewalks of Los Angeles the dreadful words fell with the suddenness of some natural calamity. 'The president is dead!' The words came from radios in cars or carried by hand or blaring out the awful news from open doorways.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2006
Nov. 21, 1930: A Los Angeles City Council appeals hearing over an assessment for paving Avenue 45 "swiftly turned into a one-man riot" when, "a protesting property owner" named Hugh Hoffman "roared defiance right and left before he was ejected," The Times reported. "Hoffman said he would prefer Al Capone as the governing force of Los Angeles, because, he said, Capone fights out in the open with guns," the newspaper said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2006
Nov. 20, 1903: Thousands were on hand at the Agricultural Park's one-mile dirt oval to watch one of the biggest stars in automobile racing make history. "Barney Oldfield's attempt to commit suicide ... only resulted in a compound fracture of the world's automobile record," The Times said. The cigar-chewing racer broke a world record by driving a mile in 55 seconds in his Winton Bullet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2006
Nov. 19, 1937: "It would have been a novel experiment, but Superior Judge Brand refused to allow a parrot to testify concerning its knowledge of the domestic affairs of James J. Reynolds, real estate broker, and Mrs. Willetta Reynolds," The Times reported. The husband's attorney, the newspaper said, wanted to put the parrot on the stand "to show that the bird had learned to call Reynolds certain abusive names and that the bird's teacher could have been none other than Mrs. Reynolds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2006
Nov. 18, 1933: The city received a major gift, The Times reported under the headline "Nippon Trees Placed in Park." "Strengthening the bond of friendship between America and Japan, more than 500 men, women and children of both countries met at Griffith Park to participate in the planting of 375 cherry trees given by Japanese individuals and organizations of Los Angeles to help beautify the city of their adoption," the newspaper said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2006
Nov. 17, 1913: Los Angeles Police Chief Charles Sebastian placed a badge on Chinese immigrant Lung Yep, who "stepped from the comparative obscurity of a clerkship in Sing Fat's store into the authority of a star and a club," The Times reported. He became, the newspaper said, "the first Chinese ever to be so invested in the United States or in the entire Occident, so far as the police records of the continent show." His appointment followed an investigation of conditions in Chinatown.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 2006
Nov. 16, 1951: "An embarrassed Pasadena Board of City Directors ... decided that they have no moral right to display 'war loot' in the City Hall foyer," The Times reported. "So the Japanese temple bell which was brought to the Crown City aboard the USS Pasadena at the conclusion of World War II will somehow be returned to its rightful home." The city's decision was prompted by a letter from 1st Lt. David C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2006
Nov. 15, 1903: A boy who said he was "not quite 11 years old" was in "a tramp's cell in the City Jail" after making his way, he said, back home to California from New Orleans. The Times described Carl Edward Lecody under the headline "Would 'Lots Ruther' Go to School; Lilliputian Hobo Says He's Sick of Tramping It."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2006
Nov. 14, 1891: A business owner decided to test the city's parking regulations, The Times reported, under the headline "Will Make a Test Case; the Right to Tie Animals on the Street to Be Tested." "Ex-City Engineer Fred Eaton set rather a singular criminal case in motion before Justice Owens of the Police Court. Mr. Eaton sets forth in his complaint that two men named S.
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