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Times 125th Anniversary

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November 30, 2006
Nov. 30, 1925: Los Angeles' "first section of underground electric railway" opened with much fanfare -- including a Chamber of Commerce luncheon for 1,100 people at the Biltmore Hotel -- and The Times declared it "the beginning of a new era in transportation" for the city. The privately owned Pacific Electric Railroad started work on the one-mile tunnel in May 1924, The Times reported. The new route connected Hollywood and Glendale with downtown Los Angeles.
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November 29, 2006
Nov. 29, 1984: Just a few hours after West Hollywood officially became a city, hundreds gathered to watch its first City Council be sworn in, The Times reported. It was "a celebration attended by an overflow crowd of enthusiastic neighbors and local dignitaries," the newspaper reported. "After being sworn into office ...
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November 28, 2006
Nov. 28, 1939: Treasure hunters dug deep into the Hollywood Bowl parking lot in search of a 74-year-old stash of gold, The Times reported. The hole they made was "big enough to bury a prehistoric hairy mammoth," the newspaper said. "By nightfall, they had delved some 12 feet toward the supposed lost wealth of Juarez -- $200,000 in gold and jewels -- without uncovering as much as a plugged doubloon." Henry Jones, a Seattle mining engineer, was behind the dig.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 2006
Nov. 27, 1917: "White Bathing Suits Taboo," read the headline in The Times after a teenager was arrested on the sands in Long Beach. " 'It's a violation of the city ordinance to wear white bathing suits on this beach,' was the comment of a police officer today as he ordered Miss Marion Williams, 17 years old, to quit the surf and accompany him to police headquarters.
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November 26, 2006
Nov. 26, 1931: Thanksgiving was not a peaceful day in the Wilshire Division police station, The Times reported under the headline "Lack of Turkey Stirs Jail Riot." "Angered when lamb stew, macaroni and carrots were substituted for turkey and trimmings on their Thanksgiving menu, 43 prisoners in the misdemeanor tank ... threw their food in splotches about the room and, after being quelled by jail attaches, were forced to clean up the mess and retire without any dinner," the newspaper said.
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November 25, 2006
Nov. 25, 1893: Three boys who, in broad daylight on horseback, approached a Chinese vegetable salesman and robbed him of his watch and $28.50 appeared in Los Angeles Superior Court, where each was held on $1,000 bail, The Times reported.
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November 24, 2006
Nov. 24, 1914: Twenty-one people -- 19 USC law students, a faculty member and a stenographer -- had "squeezed into an elevator" in the Tajo Building at 1st Street and Broadway when the cage "dropped five stories to the pit, 65 feet below," The Times reported. The accident occurred as students were "scrambling from a class in torts" and the elevator was "loaded far beyond its safety limit," the newspaper said. No one escaped injury, but none was killed.
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November 23, 2006
Nov. 23, 1904: Donations arrived at the McKinley Home for Boys just in time for Thanksgiving, The Times reported under the headline "Happy Days for Orphans." "There were fowls and vegetables and other good things to eat, and the whole thing was topped off with 72 pairs of new shoes, sent out as the Thanksgiving gift of the Mystic Shriners," the newspaper said. "Never was there a material endowment more timely.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2006
Nov. 22, 1963: This is the way Times columnist Jack Smith described a grieving Los Angeles on the day that President John F. Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas: "In the streets and sidewalks of Los Angeles the dreadful words fell with the suddenness of some natural calamity. 'The president is dead!' The words came from radios in cars or carried by hand or blaring out the awful news from open doorways.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2006
Nov. 21, 1930: A Los Angeles City Council appeals hearing over an assessment for paving Avenue 45 "swiftly turned into a one-man riot" when, "a protesting property owner" named Hugh Hoffman "roared defiance right and left before he was ejected," The Times reported. "Hoffman said he would prefer Al Capone as the governing force of Los Angeles, because, he said, Capone fights out in the open with guns," the newspaper said.
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