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NEWS
June 27, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An incinerator has burned the last of the contaminated soil from Times Beach, Mo., the town wiped off the map to contain dioxin contamination. In the early 1970s, oil later found to be contaminated with dioxin was spread on Times Beach's gravel roads and ballpark. A decade later, the problem was discovered. The town was then evacuated and leveled, and the debris burned or buried. In 1985, Times Beach aldermen voted to disincorporate the town, and it ceased to exist.
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NEWS
October 12, 1999 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Memories haunt Missouri's latest state park, just as surely as wild turkeys stalk the shaded trails. Memories. And fear. For the park perches on the rubble of Times Beach. That name might not mean much now. The town of Times Beach hasn't existed for nearly 15 years. But back in the early 1980s, Times Beach was notorious. It was the dioxin town. The poison town. Back then, just a mention of Times Beach could conjure fear. It was not quite Three Mile Island.
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NEWS
June 5, 1989
Dioxin contamination in Times Beach, Mo., has remained relatively stable, a researcher reported. Armon Yanders, director of a study funded by Amoco Oil Co., said in the 17 years since dioxin-laced oil was sprayed to control dust the highly toxic chemical has not moved into the groundwater. The federal Environmental Protection Agency closed the town, 20 miles southwest of St. Louis, after the dioxin was sprayed in 1972. Dioxin is a byproduct of the manufacture of pesticides and other chlorine compounds and of burning wood.
NEWS
June 27, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An incinerator has burned the last of the contaminated soil from Times Beach, Mo., the town wiped off the map to contain dioxin contamination. In the early 1970s, oil later found to be contaminated with dioxin was spread on Times Beach's gravel roads and ballpark. A decade later, the problem was discovered. The town was then evacuated and leveled, and the debris burned or buried. In 1985, Times Beach aldermen voted to disincorporate the town, and it ceased to exist.
NEWS
May 25, 1991 | From Associated Press
A federal health official who recommended that Times Beach be evacuated because of contamination by the chemical dioxin now says that he no longer views it as the deadly substance it was believed to be. That change of opinion could influence pending or future lawsuits involving dioxin, parties to the suits say. Dr. Vernon N. Houk of the federal Centers for Disease Control told the St.
NEWS
October 12, 1999 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Memories haunt Missouri's latest state park, just as surely as wild turkeys stalk the shaded trails. Memories. And fear. For the park perches on the rubble of Times Beach. That name might not mean much now. The town of Times Beach hasn't existed for nearly 15 years. But back in the early 1980s, Times Beach was notorious. It was the dioxin town. The poison town. Back then, just a mention of Times Beach could conjure fear. It was not quite Three Mile Island.
NEWS
May 5, 1985 | MARK PETERSON, Associated Press
From a distance, it looks merely to be a town napping peacefully in the shade of its flowering dogwood trees. It is not. Nearly every window of every building has been smashed, every item of value salvaged or stolen. Waist-high weeds harbor snakes and rodents that have migrated from the banks of the Meramec River. Graffiti has been painted on streets. The smell of mold and mildew seeps out of boarded-up houses with much the same force as the floodwaters that seeped in. There is no electricity.
NEWS
July 21, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Federal and state environmental officials announced an agreement intended to pave the way for the cleanup of the dioxin-contaminated ghost town of Times Beach, Mo., after seven years of study and negotiations. The EPA announced in St. Louis that a cleanup agreement had been reached with Syntex Agribusiness Inc., a chemical and animal health company. Under the settlement, Syntex will burn the tons of dioxin-tainted soil from Times Beach and 27 other sites in eastern Missouri.
NEWS
October 25, 1986 | Associated Press
The Charter Co. said Friday it had agreed to pay the federal government $5 million to settle an $80 million claim for cleanup costs at dioxin-contaminated Times Beach, Mo. Stephen D. Busey, Charter attorney, said that the company negotiated the agreement to expedite the firm's reorganization under Chapter 11 of the federal bankruptcy code. In the settlement, the company did not admit any responsibility for the contamination. The U.S.
NEWS
January 6, 1986 | United Press International
Dr. John Dale Cavaness, a small-town practitioner in Southern Illinois, was sentenced today to die in the gas chamber for murdering his son to collect $148,000 in insurance benefits. St. Louis County Circuit Judge Drew W. Luten Jr. followed the recommendation of the jury that found Cavaness guilty Nov. 20. No execution date was set. Cavaness, 60, said nothing when the sentence was passed but tightened his lips and stared at the floor.
NEWS
May 25, 1991 | From Associated Press
A federal health official who recommended that Times Beach be evacuated because of contamination by the chemical dioxin now says that he no longer views it as the deadly substance it was believed to be. That change of opinion could influence pending or future lawsuits involving dioxin, parties to the suits say. Dr. Vernon N. Houk of the federal Centers for Disease Control told the St.
NEWS
June 5, 1989
Dioxin contamination in Times Beach, Mo., has remained relatively stable, a researcher reported. Armon Yanders, director of a study funded by Amoco Oil Co., said in the 17 years since dioxin-laced oil was sprayed to control dust the highly toxic chemical has not moved into the groundwater. The federal Environmental Protection Agency closed the town, 20 miles southwest of St. Louis, after the dioxin was sprayed in 1972. Dioxin is a byproduct of the manufacture of pesticides and other chlorine compounds and of burning wood.
NEWS
May 5, 1985 | MARK PETERSON, Associated Press
From a distance, it looks merely to be a town napping peacefully in the shade of its flowering dogwood trees. It is not. Nearly every window of every building has been smashed, every item of value salvaged or stolen. Waist-high weeds harbor snakes and rodents that have migrated from the banks of the Meramec River. Graffiti has been painted on streets. The smell of mold and mildew seeps out of boarded-up houses with much the same force as the floodwaters that seeped in. There is no electricity.
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