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Timothy Mcveigh

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1997
Alexander Cockburn's June 29 Column Left ("Where Do We Bury McVeigh?") is remarkable. His premise is that since Timothy McVeigh was trained to kill by the Army, and all McVeigh did in Oklahoma City was simply what the Army trained him to do, how can McVeigh not now be buried in a national cemetery? Cockburn seems to believe that all people who underwent Army training are now social deviates who don't see anything wrong with bombing 168 innocent people. This is a despicable insult to those who have loyally served in America's military services.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2013 | By Robin Abcarian
What kind of power do the living have over the dead? It's a question that a Massachusetts town answered Sunday, when Cambridge City Manager Robert W. Healy said he would not allow Tamerlan Tsarnaev, the alleged mastermind of the Boston Marathon bombings, to be buried in the local public cemetery. “The difficult and stressful efforts of the citizens of the City of Cambridge to return to a peaceful life would be adversely effected by the turmoil, protests and widespread media presence at such an internment,” Healy said in a statement emailed to reporters.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2001
Re "Killing Him Lets Us Off the Hook," Commentary, June 12: "We failed Timothy McVeigh and . . . his execution fails us all." Robert Scheer's "we" does not include me. It does, however, include Scheer. If McVeigh was "us in our darkest moments" then Scheer switched off the lights. McVeigh learned the lessons of the radical movement of which Scheer was a prominent member: The government of the United States is a criminal enterprise, those who serve in the military are baby killers, and "off the pigs."
NATIONAL
May 5, 2013 | By Matt Pearce, This post has been updated. See below for details.
There may be no place in the earth for Tamerlan Tsarnaev. One of the Boston Marathon bombing suspects has been dead more than two weeks after a dramatic showdown with police in Watertown, Mass., on April 19. But officials and his family still don't know where Tsarnaev, an ethnic Chechen who turned to conservative Islam, will be buried. On Sunday, city officials in Cambridge, Tsarnaev's home in the United States, announced that the city's cemetery would reject his body for burial after other local cemeteries also said they did not want the remains.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 2001
Timothy McVeigh was rightly put to death (June 11). His note, "I am the master of my fate, the captain of my soul," tells why. He did not give 168 people the right to be the masters of their fates or the captains of their souls. Anyone who takes this right away should forfeit his own life. Douglas Hall Culver City One last thought: What if McVeigh had decided to martyr himself and explode with the bomb? We would likely never have known who engineered the thing.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2001 | Howard Rosenberg
If confessed mass murderer Timothy (not "Tim," as some TV people chummily call him) McVeigh is executed June 11 or on any other date, I want to see him die. Not necessarily in person at the U.S. Penitentiary in Terre Haute, Ind., where McVeigh is still on death row after getting a stay, although that would be fine. Already picked, though, are the few media members and others who will be watching there through a glass window, as provided by law.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2001 | AUSTIN SARAT, Austin Sarat, who teaches political science and law at Amherst College, is the author of "When the State Kills: Capital Punishment and the American Condition," forthcoming from Princeton University Press
Timothy McVeigh is back in the news, and this is bad for opponents of capital punishment. McVeigh's desire to end all further legal appeals arising from the Oklahoma City bombing and receive an execution date puts the death penalty abolitionist community in a bind.
OPINION
July 28, 2011 | By Andrew Gumbel
America's violent far right would have no difficulty recognizing the tell-tale signatures of Friday's killing spree in Norway — and not just because they would see the confessed perpetrator, Anders Behring Breivik, as an ideological soul mate who, like their own heroes, thought he could trigger a white-supremacist revolution with bombs and bullets. Breivik appears to have been more than simply inspired by American predecessors such as Timothy McVeigh, the Oklahoma City bomber: The materials he used, the way he planned and carried out his attacks, and his own writings all suggest he was deeply familiar with the actions of some notorious political killers on this side of the Atlantic.
NEWS
May 9, 2001 | SUSAN CARPENTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The one-room office with overflowing bookshelves and Maria Callas playing quietly in the background isn't the likeliest setting for a storm of controversy. Nor is its slender, soft-spoken inhabitant a likely target for angry finger-pointing. But Los Angeles composer David Woodard could easily incense the friends and family of those who were killed in the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing when he performs a musical "prequiem" for Timothy McVeigh shortly before his execution next Wednesday.
NEWS
September 29, 1995 | RICHARD A. SERRANO and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a development that could cloud the credibility of the government's key witness, new evidence in the Oklahoma City federal building bombing case appears to challenge Michael Fortier's account of suspect Timothy J. McVeigh's alleged involvement in a robbery that the government believes helped finance the blast.
OPINION
April 17, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Commenting on the horrific explosions in Boston, President Obama insisted Tuesday that "the American people refuse to be terrorized. " Brave words, but also accurate ones. In the years since 9/11, residents of this country have acquiesced in an array of inconveniences and encumbrances, hoping they are contributing to their own protection but often suspecting that this or that precaution is either arbitrary or useless. But even as they alternate between stoicism and resentment, Americans have continued to travel, socialize and take part in communal celebrations such as the Boston Marathon and New Year's Eve festivities in Times Square.
NATIONAL
April 17, 2013 | By Hailey Branson-Potts
Charlie Hanger, the man who arrested Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh, had already planned to speak to middle school students Friday on the 18th anniversary of the bombing. Now he anticipates questions from the young people about Monday's deadly bombings at the Boston Marathon, he told the Los Angeles Times.   The Boston blasts, which left at least three people dead and more than 170 injured, struck a chilling chord for Oklahomans. On April 19, 1995, a Ryder truck with a fertilizer bomb exploded outside the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, killing 168 people, including 19 children at a daycare center.
NATIONAL
April 16, 2013 | By David Horsey
The terrorist bombing at the Boston Marathon is yet another cause for despair. It places the hometown of Paul Revere, Sam Adams and the Sons of Liberty in company with Mumbai, Karachi and Baghdad, as well as Oklahoma City. Hour after hour Monday, the same heart-wrenching images cycled through the nonstop television coverage: moms, dads, kids, amateur athletes shooting for a personal best, all suddenly engulfed in horror. As I write, the death toll is set at three; the number of reported injuries has climbed to 134. Those numbers will probably be revised upward.
OPINION
September 1, 2012
Responding to an Op-Ed article Sunday on last year's mass killings in Norway and Islamophobia, Larry Shapiro wrote in a letter published Tuesday: "Nathan Lean is more concerned by acts of vandalism against Muslim institutions, suggesting that these acts are inspired by various activists and writers who spread Islamophobia. His prescription is censorship. He suggests that right-wing terrorism is of greater concern. "American terrorism carried out by the likes of David Koresh and Timothy McVeigh has nothing to do with Muslims.
OPINION
August 26, 2012 | Nathan Lean, Nathan Lean is editor in chief of AslanMedia.com. He is the author of "The Islamophobia Industry: How the Right Manufactures Fear of Muslims."
On Friday, a Norwegian court ruled that Anders Behring Breivik, who mowed down 77 people in a bombing and shooting rampage in Oslo in July 2011, was sane. It was a verdict that many had waited for, one ensuring that the cold and loveless man who carried out the country's worst bloodbath since World War II would be held responsible for his actions and not dismissed as a helpless victim of his sick mind. It was also the verdict that Breivik himself wanted. He loathed the idea of incarceration in a mental facility, a fate he called "worse than death," and insisted during the 10-week trial that his fertilizer bomb and machine gun were necessary instruments to stop what he viewed as a creeping Muslim takeover of Europe.
NEWS
November 22, 2011 | By Kim Geiger
It only took a few minutes for Newt Gingrich to display the bluntness that has become his signature quality during the Republican presidential debates. Gathered at the Daughters of the American Revolution Constitution Hall in Washington, the GOP presidential hopefuls were quizzed by CNN's Wolf Blitzer on foreign policy topics. First up was the Patriot Act. Asked whether the Patriot Act should be strengthened, Gingrich launched into a lecture about "the difference between national security requirements and criminal law requirements.
NEWS
September 30, 2011 | By Michael Muskal
Ron Paul, the Texas congressman who is seeking the GOP presidential nomination, on Friday criticized the Obama administration's action in killing Anwar Awlaki, the American-born cleric who advocated jihad against the United States. Paul was the strongest critic on the Republican side in condemning the attack, which was praised by other candidates including Texas Gov. Rick Perry. Former New Mexico Gov. Gary Johnson, a libertarian like Paul, also questioned the tactic of killing a U.S. citizen without due process.
OPINION
July 28, 2011 | By Andrew Gumbel
America's violent far right would have no difficulty recognizing the tell-tale signatures of Friday's killing spree in Norway — and not just because they would see the confessed perpetrator, Anders Behring Breivik, as an ideological soul mate who, like their own heroes, thought he could trigger a white-supremacist revolution with bombs and bullets. Breivik appears to have been more than simply inspired by American predecessors such as Timothy McVeigh, the Oklahoma City bomber: The materials he used, the way he planned and carried out his attacks, and his own writings all suggest he was deeply familiar with the actions of some notorious political killers on this side of the Atlantic.
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