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August 28, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Retired Gen. Tin Oo, a former Burmese defense minister whose influence still reaches deep into the ranks of the military, demanded Saturday that the beleaguered government of the ruling Burma Socialist Program Party give way to an interim regime. "The light of democracy is visible, but the final goal has yet to be achieved," the 62-year-old one-time army chief of staff told a cheering rally of 50,000 in downtown Rangoon, the Burmese capital.
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WORLD
March 8, 2013 | By Mark Magnier, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
NEW DELHI, India -- Myanmar's main opposition party led by Nobel laureate lawmaker Aung San Suu Kyi began three days of meetings in Yangon on Friday to elect leaders for the first time in its 25-year history. The fact that the government allowed the general assembly of the once-banned party is in itself a milestone in a country emerging from decades of repressive military rule. Suu Kyi, who spent 15 years under detention before her release in late 2010, is widely expected to be reappointed party head.
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WORLD
March 8, 2013 | By Mark Magnier, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
NEW DELHI, India -- Myanmar's main opposition party led by Nobel laureate lawmaker Aung San Suu Kyi began three days of meetings in Yangon on Friday to elect leaders for the first time in its 25-year history. The fact that the government allowed the general assembly of the once-banned party is in itself a milestone in a country emerging from decades of repressive military rule. Suu Kyi, who spent 15 years under detention before her release in late 2010, is widely expected to be reappointed party head.
NEWS
August 28, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Retired Gen. Tin Oo, a former Burmese defense minister whose influence still reaches deep into the ranks of the military, demanded Saturday that the beleaguered government of the ruling Burma Socialist Program Party give way to an interim regime. "The light of democracy is visible, but the final goal has yet to be achieved," the 62-year-old one-time army chief of staff told a cheering rally of 50,000 in downtown Rangoon, the Burmese capital.
NEWS
February 20, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
One of the most powerful generals in Myanmar's military junta was killed in a helicopter crash that left 14 other people missing, the government said. A Cabinet minister and seven junta officials appeared to be among the missing. The military helicopter, carrying 22 officials and seven crew members, crashed into the Salween river in southeastern Myanmar. Lt. Gen. Tin Oo, 67, and the rest of his party were en route to inspect a bridge.
WORLD
February 15, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Myanmar opposition figure Tin Oo, a key advisor to Aung San Suu Kyi, has been moved to house arrest in his Yangon home after being jailed since May, a government official said. Tin Oo, 77, vice chairman of the National League for Democracy, is the latest opposition official to be freed from jail since a clash between Suu Kyi's followers and government supporters May 30.
WORLD
June 14, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi left Yangon, Myanmar's capital, today on a pilgrimage to Thamanya mountain, her first trip to the countryside since her release from house arrest May 6. Suu Kyi's car was joined by three other vehicles carrying her National League for Democracy party vice chairman, Tin Oo, and his wife, other senior members of the party, youth members and a doctor, party officials said, speaking on condition of anonymity.
NEWS
April 8, 1997 | Times Wire Services
A bomb exploded at the house of one of Myanmar's top military officials, killing his daughter and setting off a security alert in Yangon, the government and diplomats said Monday. The bomb went off Sunday night at the home of Lt. Gen. Tin Oo, one of two secretaries of the State Law and Order Restoration Council and army chief of staff.
NEWS
September 28, 1988
Burmese fleeing to frontier areas said they saw troops execute anti-government protesters. Western diplomats in Rangoon say there are increasing reports of executions of lower-level anti-government leaders, but they have yet to be confirmed. The opposition League for Democracy accused Burma's military regime of torture, killings and illegal arrests, and demanded that they stop.
NEWS
September 23, 2000 | Associated Press
Striking a fresh blow against pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi, Myanmar's military regime detained her deputy and eight other followers Friday after thwarting their latest attempt to travel outside the capital, Yangon. Suu Kyi and Tin Oo, the deputy leader of her National League for Democracy, were evicted from Yangon's railway station early Friday when they became "abusive," a government statement said. Suu Kyi was escorted home, it added.
NEWS
August 27, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Two senior members of the National League for Democracy opposition party were freed from virtual house arrest a day before the U.N. envoy who kick-started reconciliation talks was to visit the country. With the lifting of restrictions on party Chairman Aung Shwe and Vice Chairman Tin Oo, only Nobel peace laureate and opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi remains under house arrest a year after party members were detained for defying a travel ban.
NEWS
September 3, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Security forces in Myanmar raided the headquarters of opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi's pro-democracy party after forcing the Nobel Peace laureate to end a nine-day roadside standoff, party officials said. Sources close to Suu Kyi's National League for Democracy, or NLD, said the security forces seized documents and sealed the offices.
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