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Tina Brown

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2010 | By Robin Abcarian
It's possible that she's hard on herself in private, but in public Tina Brown has never been one for self-doubt. A precocious magazine editor who breathed new life into the fusty Tatler (at age 25), Vanity Fair (at 30) and the venerable New Yorker (at 38), Brown's success was notable for many things, among them the envy it inspired and her prodigious talent for self-promotion. And then came Talk, the magazine, book and entertainment venture that was supposed to secure her place in the cultural firmament, starting with the scandalously decadent launch party she threw at the foot of the Statue of Liberty in August 1999.
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NEWS
April 4, 2014 | By Maeve Reston
For decades, questions posed to Hillary Rodham Clinton have turned on the subject of hair. But for all the eyerolls, that famous coif - in all its scrunchie-to-bob iterations - has turned out to be a very helpful talking point. The occasion Thursday night was Tina Brown's “Women In the World” conference in New York, and it was New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman - introduced by Brown as a “sensitive man” -   who asked the former secretary of State and her co-panelist, International Monetary Fund Chief Christine Lagarde, to reflect on whether there was “still a double standard in the media about how we talk about women in public life.” To laughter, Friedman recalled a news clip in which Clinton had said she'd flown all night to meet with a foreign leader and had tied her hair back - “and you said when you came into the room, he was really frightened,” Friedman said, “because he had heard that when your hair was back, you were going to deliver unpleasant news.” “Really, Tom?
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 1986 | PAUL ROSENFIELD
There is so much undiluted undisguised assurance in the room where Tina Brown works that "power seating" is unnecessary--the editor in chief of Vanity Fair works on a table she designed in the shape of an apostrophe. So it really doesn't matter who sits where. Because Tina Brown is sitting at the figurative head of the table, anyway. The Times of London calls her the highest-profile editor in New York. But Tina Brown is after more than Faux Glitz.
NEWS
March 3, 2014 | By Kerry Cavanaugh
California voters - thankfully - will probably not have to decide in November whether to legalize marijuana for recreational use. Backers of the Control, Regulate and Tax Marijuana Act, which had the most funding and organized support of four potential state ballot measures, decided to aim for the 2016 election instead. This will let California learn from the mistakes and successes of Colorado and Washington state, which are rolling out legal weed this year, and help proponents devise a better regulatory model than the state's confusing laws on the distribution of medical marijuana.
NEWS
April 23, 1992 | BOB SIPCHEN
Magazines reflect and inform the culture like no other medium, and Vanity Fair has influenced magazines like no other publication of late. So Tina Brown, the editor-in-chief who made Vanity Fair what it is, is a natural profile subject. "Queen Tina," in the May issue of Spy, is different from most recent portraits of Brown, though--more like the profiles writers did before Vanity Fair's pull-those-punches approach became pervasive.
NEWS
July 12, 1992 | THE SOCIAL CLIMES STAFF
The earthquake that shook the brie-ridden world of the cultural elite this month was the announcement that Vanity Fair Editor Tina Brown would be hopping over to the New Yorker. Words such as venerable are usually used to describe the New Yorker, just as flashy usually goes with the mag Brown leaves behind. Social Climes heard that the reaction around the Vanity Fair office in New York was primarily in the how-does-this-affect- moi range.
NEWS
July 1, 1992 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a major publishing shake-up, Tina Brown, editor of Vanity Fair, will relinquish her post and take over the venerable but troubled New Yorker this fall, it was announced Tuesday. Robert Gottlieb, current editor-in-chief of the New Yorker, said he was stepping down because of "conceptual differences" over the magazine's future with S.I. (Si) Newhouse, the media tycoon whose family owns both publications.
NEWS
October 1, 1992 | BOB SIPCHEN
Throughout snootier Manhattan nooks, the familiar sound of the New Yorker magazine plopping through mail slots this week has been followed by another distinct refrain: Aaaarrrggghh! The new issue, after all, marks the premiere of Tina Brown as editor of America's most prestigious journal and, it has been suggested, the long-dreaded arrival of cultural Armageddon. Right? Well. . . .
NEWS
January 30, 1985 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, Times Staff Writer
On a good day, and allowing for traffic, the trip between Hackensack, N.J., and the plush midtown Manhattan offices of Conde Nast Publications takes about 15 minutes. For Vanity Fair Editor-in-Chief Tina Brown the journey was more like 10 years, a series of British magazines and newspapers, a string of honors and awards, a miracle-worker transformation of Britain's flagging Tatler, two well-received books, a high-profile courtship and marriage and a sequined G-string.
NEWS
March 26, 1990 | JEANNINE STEIN, TIMES SOCIETY WRITER
No matter that Nancy Reagan just said no. Tout Hollywood just said yes. Vanity Fair editor Tina Brown pulled together an eclectic, star-filled A-list party Thursday night at Culver Studios to drum up support for Phoenix House, the substance-abuse program headed by Dr. Mitchell Rosenthal. Phoenix House used to have a strong cheerleader in the former First Lady until she yanked her support.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
You may have missed it, but Tina Brown recently went to India and proclaimed the death of magazines, journalism and of reading itself, more or less in that order. Brown, the former editor of Newsweek and the New Yorker, must not do much reading herself anymore. Why else would such an intelligent woman say reading must be dead because “I think you can have more satisfaction from live conversation”? Civilization, Brown added, is “going back to oral culture where the written word will be less relevant.” Brown's words, spoken at a conference in Goa, India, were jotted down by a writer for the Hindustan Times who then reported them in that venerable storytelling form called journalism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 2013 | By Robin Abcarian, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
If Tina Brown is no longer editing magazines, then magazines must be dying. If Tina Brown is going into the live conference business, then the written word must be dying. That, at any rate, is the assessment of Tina Brown, who may not always be on the cutting edge, but has the uncanny ability to make you think she is. What does the future of communication hold? Less writing. More talking. At a conference in India last week, which was covered by the Hindustan Times , Brown, who is leaving the Daily Beast website at the end of the year, pronounced the death of the very sort of journalism that made her famous.
OPINION
October 21, 2012
Re "Newsweek to discontinue print edition at year's end," Business, Oct. 19 Sadly enough, nothing lasts forever. Despite Newsweek's nearly 80 years in print, since the takeover by editor Tina Brown and her magazine makeover, I've watched the publication progress into a downward spiral. What's been most disappointing to me were the stories that read more like gossip instead of being genuinely newsworthy. Oddly enough, just days ago, I made a decision not to renew my subscription after 26 years of reading the magazine.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2011
KEN BRECHER LIBRARY FOUNDATION OF LOS ANGELES PRESIDENT What should the 21st century library look like? That's the question Ken Brecher has been asking; it propelled him to visit more than 60 of the 73 branches of the Los Angeles Public Library in his first 10 months as president of the Library Foundation of Los Angeles. The foundation raises money to support the programs of the city's libraries, a critical role as the libraries have fallen victim to recent city budget cuts.
NATIONAL
November 13, 2010 | By Robin Abcarian, Los Angeles Times
It's a familiar story: A seemingly mismatched pair falls for each other and ties the knot while some look on hopefully and others hold their breath. The merger of Newsweek magazine and the Daily Beast website, announced Friday, is a classic May-December marriage. Newsweek, 77 years old and recently purchased for a dollar by audio pioneer Sidney Harman, gets an infusion of energy and immediacy from the 2-year-old Beast and its irrepressible editor and co-founder, Tina Brown. The Daily Beast, part of media mogul Barry Diller's InterActive Corp.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2010 | By Robin Abcarian
It's possible that she's hard on herself in private, but in public Tina Brown has never been one for self-doubt. A precocious magazine editor who breathed new life into the fusty Tatler (at age 25), Vanity Fair (at 30) and the venerable New Yorker (at 38), Brown's success was notable for many things, among them the envy it inspired and her prodigious talent for self-promotion. And then came Talk, the magazine, book and entertainment venture that was supposed to secure her place in the cultural firmament, starting with the scandalously decadent launch party she threw at the foot of the Statue of Liberty in August 1999.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1992 | STEPHEN RANDALL, Stephen Randall writes the media column for Playboy magazine. He is based in Los Angeles. and
A friend from New York writes: "Perhaps you heard about the earthquake. We mean our Big One, the major shock that forced New York magazine mavens to double their lunchtime martini intake: Tina Brown, the noted glitz addict and editor of Vanity Fair, is becoming, God help us, editor of the New Yorker. "Frankly, we're concerned. Like everyone else, we have a certain fondness for the New Yorker.
BUSINESS
July 9, 1998 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tina Brown, one of the nation's most closely watched magazine editors, stunned the publishing world Wednesday by unexpectedly resigning after six years as editor of the New Yorker magazine. The move raised fresh questions about the future of the venerable but money-losing magazine, a landmark on the American literary scene that has been the launching pad for such notable works as John Hersey's "Hiroshima" and showcase for such respected authors as John Updike, Truman Capote and James Baldwin.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2008 | Julia Keller
In a recent interview designed to gin up interest in her new webzine, the Daily Beast, Tina Brown -- former editor of such buzz-infused publications as Vanity Fair and the New Yorker -- offered a keen precis on the Gospel of Buzz. Her interlocutor asked Brown how she dealt with the nasty jabs and vicious smears and mean-spirited quips that have come flying her way over the years, as her employment fortunes rose and fell and rose.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2008 | Maria Russo, Times Staff Writer
It wasn't so long ago that Tina Brown and Bonnie Fuller were busy transforming entire magazine genres. They lived on opposite ends of the taste spectrum -- Brown edited Vanity Fair and the New Yorker; Fuller revamped Glamour, then reinvented the celebrity gossip concept at Us Weekly and later Star -- but the two had a similar formula: a willingness to throw out the old model, a feel for where the culture was heading and a forward-driving tenacity that...
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