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Tina Brown

BUSINESS
August 16, 1998
That old line from the past, "Too hep, gotta go," ran through my mind as I canceled my subscription to the New Yorker recently. Ads were too hep, some of the writing too hep, but the cartoons remained priceless. I sought the cartoon books. And perhaps it was time for the too-hep Tina Brown to go ["Tina Brown Unexpectedly Resigns as New Yorker Editor," July 9]. Did she ever live up to the magazine's serious reputation? Or is it that today's readers clamor for "hepness" above all? MARY MEYER Pasadena
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NEWS
July 16, 1998 | PAUL D. COLFORD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Shortly before Tina Brown stunned her boss and the publishing industry last week by announcing her exit from the New Yorker, the magazine sent to my home a subscription offer promising "the world's best cartoons" and the best magazine "with Tina Brown as editor." All for $19.98 a year, a savings of more than $124 off the cover price. That steep discount goes a long way to illustrate the financial problems plaguing a magazine that lost an estimated $11 million last year. The $19.
NEWS
July 14, 1998 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
David Remnick, 39, a staff writer at the New Yorker since 1992 and winner of the Pulitzer Prize for general nonfiction in 1994, was named Monday to succeed Tina Brown as editor of the magazine. S.I. Newhouse Jr., chairman of Conde Nast Publications, which owns the New Yorker, called Remnick "a key contributor, whose work helped define the magazine. His standards of writing and reporting epitomize all the best qualities of the New Yorker's heritage."
BUSINESS
July 10, 1998 | CLAUDIA ELLER
Even by Hollywood standards, some things are hard to fathom. At least at first blush. One is the unlikely marriage of Tina Brown and Harvey Weinstein--the media world's latest odd couple.
NEWS
July 10, 1998 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN
Tina Brown, S.I. Newhouse Jr., chairman of Advance Publications, the parent company of Conde Nast, and Steven T. Florio, the president and CEO of Conde Nast, met on Thursday with the New Yorker's staff to make assurances. Newhouse said he was not cutting the budget of the new editor, whom he hoped to select by the middle of next week. In response to a question, he also said that he was not going to hire an efficiency expert to study the money-losing magazine.
NEWS
July 10, 1998 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Tina Brown came to the New Yorker--the rather smug, genteelly liberal New Yorker--as editor in 1992, the literati gasped. This brash young Brit in the sacred halls once trod by Dorothy Parker, Robert Benchley and James Thurber? This, after all, was the same Tina Brown who'd just turned around the oh-so-celebrity-and-advertiser-friendly Vanity Fair. Brown hadn't hung her hat in her new office before New Yorker devotees began protesting. Horrors! was the more or less universal response.
NEWS
July 10, 1998 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tina Brown, the celebrity editor who is leaving the New Yorker to go into business with Miramax, is hardly the first journalist to make the perilous jump to Hollywood. Scores of screenwriters--Paul Attanasio ("Donnie Brasco"), Pete Dexter ("Michael") and William Broyles Jr. ("Apollo 13"), to name just three--used to edit and write for newspapers and magazines, and the same is true of many well-known producers. Lynda Obst ("Contact," "Hope Floats") worked at the New York Times Magazine.
BUSINESS
July 9, 1998 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tina Brown, one of the nation's most closely watched magazine editors, stunned the publishing world Wednesday by unexpectedly resigning after six years as editor of the New Yorker magazine. The move raised fresh questions about the future of the venerable but money-losing magazine, a landmark on the American literary scene that has been the launching pad for such notable works as John Hersey's "Hiroshima" and showcase for such respected authors as John Updike, Truman Capote and James Baldwin.
NEWS
December 30, 1996 | ELEANOR RANDOLPH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this city's contentious world of letters, they are known simply as Tina and Harry. Or "Teenanarry," which is how their names sound when they are whispered in awe or horror by the city's literati. Tina Brown, 43, has been editor of one of the nation's most revered magazines, the New Yorker, since 1992. Her husband, Harry Evans, 68, has been running one of the country's largest publishing houses, Random House, since 1990. Separately, each would command Manhattan's attention.
NEWS
May 30, 1993
"The Talk of The Town" by Bob Sipchen (May 11) belongs more properly in the obituary section. As one of very few survivors who can boast of having cut his literary teeth on Harold Ross' first edition of a once-noble institution, I mourn its passing. Publisher S. I. Newhouse and (Editor) Tina Brown have killed the New Yorker and converted the corpse to the Journal of the Middle Finger Generation. I shall not renew my subscription, which follows that of my parents for almost 70 years continuity.
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