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Tina Brown

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1992 | STEPHEN RANDALL, Stephen Randall writes the media column for Playboy magazine. He is based in Los Angeles. and
A friend from New York writes: "Perhaps you heard about the earthquake. We mean our Big One, the major shock that forced New York magazine mavens to double their lunchtime martini intake: Tina Brown, the noted glitz addict and editor of Vanity Fair, is becoming, God help us, editor of the New Yorker. "Frankly, we're concerned. Like everyone else, we have a certain fondness for the New Yorker.
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NEWS
July 1, 1992 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a major publishing shake-up, Tina Brown, editor of Vanity Fair, will relinquish her post and take over the venerable but troubled New Yorker this fall, it was announced Tuesday. Robert Gottlieb, current editor-in-chief of the New Yorker, said he was stepping down because of "conceptual differences" over the magazine's future with S.I. (Si) Newhouse, the media tycoon whose family owns both publications.
NEWS
April 23, 1992 | BOB SIPCHEN
Magazines reflect and inform the culture like no other medium, and Vanity Fair has influenced magazines like no other publication of late. So Tina Brown, the editor-in-chief who made Vanity Fair what it is, is a natural profile subject. "Queen Tina," in the May issue of Spy, is different from most recent portraits of Brown, though--more like the profiles writers did before Vanity Fair's pull-those-punches approach became pervasive.
MAGAZINE
November 3, 1991 | BILL THOMAS, Bill Thomas, a former reporter for the Baltimore Sun, is writing a book on the Soviet economy for Dutton. His last stories for this magazine were on CNN and Soviet Georgia.
AT THE HEIGHT OF MORNING RUSH HOUR, a midnight-blue limousine, damp with the mist of a light rain, pulls up to the curb. Look closely and you can see a reflection of Madison Avenue in the shiny hood, and through the back window, a flash of blond hair. The door opens, and a pair of female legs emerges. Showcased in a black dress, the legs belong to Tina Brown, and as she touches down in front of Conde Nast headquarters in New York, she might as well be walking on a red carpet.
NEWS
March 26, 1990 | JEANNINE STEIN, TIMES SOCIETY WRITER
No matter that Nancy Reagan just said no. Tout Hollywood just said yes. Vanity Fair editor Tina Brown pulled together an eclectic, star-filled A-list party Thursday night at Culver Studios to drum up support for Phoenix House, the substance-abuse program headed by Dr. Mitchell Rosenthal. Phoenix House used to have a strong cheerleader in the former First Lady until she yanked her support.
NEWS
March 20, 1990 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's the do-good decade, proclaims Vanity Fair magazine. And few are better placed to do it than Vanity Fair Editor in Chief Tina Brown. After six years at the helm, she is New York's priestess of glossy publishing, the turnaround artist who molded a tottering, year-old magazine into an upscale, high-profile monthly. (Circulation was 220,000 when she took over; it was 760,000 at last count, and advertising has tripled, too.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 1986 | PAUL ROSENFIELD
There is so much undiluted undisguised assurance in the room where Tina Brown works that "power seating" is unnecessary--the editor in chief of Vanity Fair works on a table she designed in the shape of an apostrophe. So it really doesn't matter who sits where. Because Tina Brown is sitting at the figurative head of the table, anyway. The Times of London calls her the highest-profile editor in New York. But Tina Brown is after more than Faux Glitz.
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