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Tina Kerbrat

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1991 | CHARISSE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was graduation day and the Los Angeles Police Department Concert Band heralded the occasion with everything from "The Star-Spangled Banner" to the theme from "The Magnificent Seven." But as the Police Academy gave birth to 60 new officers, the death of one who graduated only four months before could not be forgotten. Her name was Tina Kerbrat, a young mother who less than two weeks ago became the first female Los Angeles police officer killed in the line of duty.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 2000 | IRENE GARCIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly a decade after Tina Kerbrat became the first female officer in Los Angeles history to die in the line of duty, she will be honored by the community she lost her life protecting. In a ceremony Saturday morning at Sun Valley Park, city officials and community activists will honor Kerbrat by dedicating a large bronze plaque with her Los Angeles Police Department badge number and a brief inscription in English and Spanish.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1991 | LESLIE BERGER and IRIS SCHNEIDER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Los Angeles Patrol Officer Tina Kerbrat, the Police Department's first female officer to die in the line of duty, was honored Friday before 4,000 mourners as a hero whose fatal shooting should humble a society unable to control its violence. "We as a community have not done what is necessary to make our streets, our neighborhoods, our homes and our children safe," said Archbishop Roger Mahony, who led Kerbrat's funeral Mass at St. John Baptist de la Salle Catholic Church in Granada Hills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1994 | LESLIE BERGER and ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Two months after her graduation from the Los Angeles Police Academy, Officer Tina Kerbrat had to drive a murder victim's mother back to the North Hollywood station and question the woman about her son. It was a task that left the rookie officer--herself the mother of two young children--saddened and shaken.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1991
Several months ago the president of our congregation, Anita Green, was murdered. As she lay in the hospital for two days before she died, she was guarded by two police officers. Tina Kerbrat, the policewoman killed, was one of them. So many believe that cops are callous and lack understanding of the human condition. Tina Kerbrat literally took Anita's son and daughter-in-law, and those of us gathered at her bedside, into her arms with great sensitivity and compassion. She was a mother, a cop, a psychiatrist, a clergyperson, a human being who deeply cared about our community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1991
I am writing in response to allegations made by newly appointed Police Commissioner Melanie Lomax with regard to the statements made by Gates concerning the killer of Tina Kerbrat (Metro, Feb. 13). Free speech is a right granted to us all. This includes our chief of police. For Lomax to call Gates' remarks "racist," impinges upon the rights of all of us to express the truth. One has to wonder if the same statements were made by Mayor Tom Bradley if any clamor would have been raised by Lomax.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1991
On Feb. 11, at 12:20 a.m., just 24 1/2 hours after her 34th birthday, Los Angeles Police Officer Tina Zapata Kerbrat died. She died while trying to protect the people of Los Angeles by making their streets safe. She died while serving all the people of Los Angeles without regard for their race, nationality, creed, religion, age, sex or their status of residency in this country. She died without warning; without reason. She died when a drunken illegal immigrant from El Salvador walked up to her police car and shot her point-blank in the face with a .357-magnum pistol.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1991 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A group of immigrant rights advocates demanded an apology from Police Chief Daryl F. Gates on Thursday for what they called racist remarks about a Salvadoran national who shot and killed Los Angeles Police Officer Tina Kerbrat. In a bitter statement following Monday's shooting of Kerbrat--a 34-year-old mother of two and the first Los Angeles policewoman murdered in the line of duty--Gates described her killer as "an El Salvadoran drunk--a drunk who doesn't belong here."
NEWS
February 12, 1991 | MICHAEL CONNELLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the North Hollywood Division, the flag was at half-staff by the time the sun was up Monday and most officers at the Los Angeles police station wore black mourning bands across their badges by the first roll call. The news traveled fast and hard. The slaying of Officer Tina Kerbrat was the crowning blow to the 233 officers assigned to the station. A week earlier, two other North Hollywood officers were shot while on patrol. They survived, but Kerbrat, a 34-year-old rookie, did not.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1991
Sadness and anger are natural reactions to the shooting death of policewoman Tina Kerbrat, the first female Los Angeles police officer killed in the line of duty. But anguish must not lead us to wrongly place blame for what appears to have been no more than an utterly brutal, random and senseless act of violence. Officer Kerbrat, a 34-year-old mother of two, never had a chance to defend herself.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1991
On Feb. 11, at 12:20 a.m., just 24 1/2 hours after her 34th birthday, Los Angeles Police Officer Tina Zapata Kerbrat died. She died while trying to protect the people of Los Angeles by making their streets safe. She died while serving all the people of Los Angeles without regard for their race, nationality, creed, religion, age, sex or their status of residency in this country. She died without warning; without reason. She died when a drunken illegal immigrant from El Salvador walked up to her police car and shot her point-blank in the face with a .357-magnum pistol.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1991 | CHARISSE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was graduation day and the Los Angeles Police Department Concert Band heralded the occasion with everything from "The Star-Spangled Banner" to the theme from "The Magnificent Seven." But as the Police Academy gave birth to 60 new officers, the death of one who graduated only four months before could not be forgotten. Her name was Tina Kerbrat, a young mother who less than two weeks ago became the first female Los Angeles police officer killed in the line of duty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1991
I am writing in response to allegations made by newly appointed Police Commissioner Melanie Lomax with regard to the statements made by Gates concerning the killer of Tina Kerbrat (Metro, Feb. 13). Free speech is a right granted to us all. This includes our chief of police. For Lomax to call Gates' remarks "racist," impinges upon the rights of all of us to express the truth. One has to wonder if the same statements were made by Mayor Tom Bradley if any clamor would have been raised by Lomax.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1991 | PATT MORRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The whimpering man was laid out on his belly in the ambulance, a pose more considerate of medical efficiency than dignity, his pants yanked down and his bloodied buttocks swaddled in gauze. Across the street, the storekeeper who had shot him in the behind was handcuffed, still glowering from the argument that had gotten out of hand. A young fireman bent down to the open window of Sgt. Gene Lewis' police car, idling alongside the ambulance. "What's going on, all you guys getting shot at?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1991 | LESLIE BERGER and IRIS SCHNEIDER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Los Angeles Patrol Officer Tina Kerbrat, the Police Department's first female officer to die in the line of duty, was honored Friday before 4,000 mourners as a hero whose fatal shooting should humble a society unable to control its violence. "We as a community have not done what is necessary to make our streets, our neighborhoods, our homes and our children safe," said Archbishop Roger Mahony, who led Kerbrat's funeral Mass at St. John Baptist de la Salle Catholic Church in Granada Hills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1991 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A group of immigrant rights advocates demanded an apology from Police Chief Daryl F. Gates on Thursday for what they called racist remarks about a Salvadoran national who shot and killed Los Angeles Police Officer Tina Kerbrat. In a bitter statement following Monday's shooting of Kerbrat--a 34-year-old mother of two and the first Los Angeles policewoman murdered in the line of duty--Gates described her killer as "an El Salvadoran drunk--a drunk who doesn't belong here."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1994 | LESLIE BERGER and ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Two months after her graduation from the Los Angeles Police Academy, Officer Tina Kerbrat had to drive a murder victim's mother back to the North Hollywood station and question the woman about her son. It was a task that left the rookie officer--herself the mother of two young children--saddened and shaken.
NEWS
February 12, 1991 | LESLIE BERGER and STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A rookie Los Angeles policewoman was shot to death in Sun Valley early Monday morning by an assailant who in turn was fatally wounded during a brief gun battle with the officer's partner. Tina Kerbrat, 34, was the department's first female officer killed in the line of duty. Kerbrat, who stepped out of her black-and-white cruiser shortly after midnight to question two men drinking beer in public, had no time to speak or draw her gun, according to police accounts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1991
Sadness and anger are natural reactions to the shooting death of policewoman Tina Kerbrat, the first female Los Angeles police officer killed in the line of duty. But anguish must not lead us to wrongly place blame for what appears to have been no more than an utterly brutal, random and senseless act of violence. Officer Kerbrat, a 34-year-old mother of two, never had a chance to defend herself.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1991
Several months ago the president of our congregation, Anita Green, was murdered. As she lay in the hospital for two days before she died, she was guarded by two police officers. Tina Kerbrat, the policewoman killed, was one of them. So many believe that cops are callous and lack understanding of the human condition. Tina Kerbrat literally took Anita's son and daughter-in-law, and those of us gathered at her bedside, into her arms with great sensitivity and compassion. She was a mother, a cop, a psychiatrist, a clergyperson, a human being who deeply cared about our community.
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