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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1989 | PHILIPP GOLLNER, Times Staff Writer
The organizer of a group asking that Los Angeles declare a Studio City carwash and gas station cultural landmarks will ask the city today to protect a neighboring coffee shop too. Jack McGrath said Wednesday he will formally request that the Los Angeles Cultural Heritage Commission consider a Tiny Naylor's restaurant for cultural landmark status as an example of distinctive 1950s coffee-shop architecture. McGrath and representatives of five Studio City community groups previously had asked that the neighboring 1950s-style gas station and 60-year-old carwash be declared landmarks to stall plans by the property's owner to build a $15-million, two-story shopping center on the site at the intersection of Laurel Canyon and Ventura boulevards.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1991 | LEN HALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The old and long vacant Tiny Naylor's restaurant, a local landmark because of its location at the busy intersection of Ortega Highway, Del Obispo Street and Interstate 5, will remain boarded a while longer. The City Council this week decided that plans to more than triple its size and create a commercial center was "too massive" for the site and sent the project back to the Planning Commission.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1989
Jack McGrath's letter (July 16) said that the corner on Ventura and Laurel Canyon boulevards should be kept as is because visitors would come to see Telly Savalas and Sharon Gless get their cars washed. I couldn't care less who gets their cars washed. I just want that area to stay as is because there are too many mini-malls, cars, office and apartment buildings. What we have is bad air, too much traffic and half-empty buildings. We need the gas station/car wash, and Tiny Naylor's has been there too long to let it go. The City Council should put a moratorium on excessive building.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1989
Jack McGrath's letter (July 16) said that the corner on Ventura and Laurel Canyon boulevards should be kept as is because visitors would come to see Telly Savalas and Sharon Gless get their cars washed. I couldn't care less who gets their cars washed. I just want that area to stay as is because there are too many mini-malls, cars, office and apartment buildings. What we have is bad air, too much traffic and half-empty buildings. We need the gas station/car wash, and Tiny Naylor's has been there too long to let it go. The City Council should put a moratorium on excessive building.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1989 | GABE FUENTES, Times Staff Writer
About 125 people rallied Sunday against a developer's plan to build a mini-mall where a carwash and a coffee shop now stand in Studio City, vowing to boycott the shopping center if it is ever built. "If they don't stop, we won't shop," read several of the signs carried by the protesters who came in support of the 1950s-era carwash and the Tiny Naylor's restaurant at the southeast corner of Ventura and Laurel Canyon boulevards. The residents want the carwash preserved as a cultural monument because of its tall boomerang-shaped steel girders, which, they say, mark "the Gateway to Studio City."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1989
Developer Ira Smedra wants to replace a 60-year-old gas station, a 35-year-old carwash and a 28-year-old cafe at Ventura and laurel Canyon boulevards with a mini-mall. Opponents argue the three structures epitomize San Fernando Valley culture and should be preserved. Others say if a carwash is culture, it's a culture they choose not to embrace. Jack McGrath, a 43-year-old real estate broker, organized the group known as Save Our Corner, which supports preservation of the carwash, gas station and Tiny Naylor's cafe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1989 | BOB POOL, Times Staff Writer
Some called the idea frivolous and a joke, but that didn't stop Los Angeles city officials from refusing to scrub a proposal Wednesday to make a San Fernando Valley carwash a city cultural monument. Instead, they gave it a second chance. Members of the Cultural Heritage Commission were split 2 to 1 in favor of declaring a 1950s-style carwash at Ventura and Laurel Canyon boulevards as the official "Gateway to the San Fernando Valley." But because three votes are needed before cultural monument status can be granted, the commissioners decided to postpone voting on the proposal until after the nomination of a fourth commissioner goes before the City Council next week.
NEWS
June 27, 1989 | Robert A. Jones
From time to time, California will spontaneously produce an event that seems to perpetuate the worst myths about life here. You can always tell when this has happened because the people back East will let us know. The episode pops up on the network news, gets sprinkled around the big newspapers. Invariably these stories are told in the way of a joke. We have one of these events playing itself out right now. In the San Fernando Valley, a group of citizens has nominated a Unocal gas station and carwash for landmark status.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1991 | LEN HALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The old and long vacant Tiny Naylor's restaurant, a local landmark because of its location at the busy intersection of Ortega Highway, Del Obispo Street and Interstate 5, will remain boarded a while longer. The City Council this week decided that plans to more than triple its size and create a commercial center was "too massive" for the site and sent the project back to the Planning Commission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1989 | GREG BRAXTON, Times Staff Writer
The air outside Tiny Naylor's coffee shop in Studio City on Wednesday was blazing hot. The mood inside the coffee shop and the neighboring carwash was hotter yet. A little more than an hour after the Los Angeles Cultural Commission rejected a proposal to designate the coffee shop, carwash and adjoining gas station as cultural landmarks, proponents of the plan gathered in Tiny Naylor's to plot counterattacks. They were disappointed but not discouraged.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1989 | GREG BRAXTON, Times Staff Writer
The air outside Tiny Naylor's coffee shop in Studio City on Wednesday was blazing hot. The mood inside the coffee shop and the neighboring carwash was hotter yet. A little more than an hour after the Los Angeles Cultural Commission rejected a proposal to designate the coffee shop, carwash and adjoining gas station as cultural landmarks, proponents of the plan gathered in Tiny Naylor's to plot counterattacks. They were disappointed but not discouraged.
NEWS
June 27, 1989 | Robert A. Jones
From time to time, California will spontaneously produce an event that seems to perpetuate the worst myths about life here. You can always tell when this has happened because the people back East will let us know. The episode pops up on the network news, gets sprinkled around the big newspapers. Invariably these stories are told in the way of a joke. We have one of these events playing itself out right now. In the San Fernando Valley, a group of citizens has nominated a Unocal gas station and carwash for landmark status.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1989
Developer Ira Smedra wants to replace a 60-year-old gas station, a 35-year-old carwash and a 28-year-old cafe at Ventura and laurel Canyon boulevards with a mini-mall. Opponents argue the three structures epitomize San Fernando Valley culture and should be preserved. Others say if a carwash is culture, it's a culture they choose not to embrace. Jack McGrath, a 43-year-old real estate broker, organized the group known as Save Our Corner, which supports preservation of the carwash, gas station and Tiny Naylor's cafe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1989 | BOB POOL, Times Staff Writer
Some called the idea frivolous and a joke, but that didn't stop Los Angeles city officials from refusing to scrub a proposal Wednesday to make a San Fernando Valley carwash a city cultural monument. Instead, they gave it a second chance. Members of the Cultural Heritage Commission were split 2 to 1 in favor of declaring a 1950s-style carwash at Ventura and Laurel Canyon boulevards as the official "Gateway to the San Fernando Valley." But because three votes are needed before cultural monument status can be granted, the commissioners decided to postpone voting on the proposal until after the nomination of a fourth commissioner goes before the City Council next week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1989 | PHILIPP GOLLNER, Times Staff Writer
The organizer of a group asking that Los Angeles declare a Studio City carwash and gas station cultural landmarks will ask the city today to protect a neighboring coffee shop too. Jack McGrath said Wednesday he will formally request that the Los Angeles Cultural Heritage Commission consider a Tiny Naylor's restaurant for cultural landmark status as an example of distinctive 1950s coffee-shop architecture. McGrath and representatives of five Studio City community groups previously had asked that the neighboring 1950s-style gas station and 60-year-old carwash be declared landmarks to stall plans by the property's owner to build a $15-million, two-story shopping center on the site at the intersection of Laurel Canyon and Ventura boulevards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1989 | GABE FUENTES, Times Staff Writer
About 125 people rallied Sunday against a developer's plan to build a mini-mall where a carwash and a coffee shop now stand in Studio City, vowing to boycott the shopping center if it is ever built. "If they don't stop, we won't shop," read several of the signs carried by the protesters who came in support of the 1950s-era carwash and the Tiny Naylor's restaurant at the southeast corner of Ventura and Laurel Canyon boulevards. The residents want the carwash preserved as a cultural monument because of its tall boomerang-shaped steel girders, which, they say, mark "the Gateway to Studio City."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1985
Police arrested a Corona restaurant manager Friday, charging him with embezzling about $9,000 from the Owen's Pantry restaurant he managed on Pomona Road. Howard Lee Wright, 44, of Riverside was booked into the Corona City Jail for allegedly embezzling the money over the past year, said Lt. Sam Spiegel, commander of detectives for the Corona Police Department. The money was discovered missing during an audit of the restaurant's books, Spiegel said. Owen's Pantry is owned by Tiny Naylor's Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1989
The operator of a Studio City carwash, which has been the focus of an unsuccessful cultural monument campaign, received an eviction notice Tuesday from a developer who plans to tear it down to make room for a mini-mall. The 28-year-old carwash and an adjoining Unocal gas station must shut down Sept. 1. After Unocal removes underground gasoline tanks and checks for pollution, the site will be turned over Oct. 19 to developer Ira Smedra, said Pat Galati, the carwash's owner.
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