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Tissue Transplants

NEWS
April 26, 1991 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new director of the National Institutes of Health said Thursday that while she continues to believe that it is acceptable to use fetal tissue for biomedical research, she will abide by the ban on federal funding for such work "without hesitation." Dr. Bernadine P.
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NEWS
January 8, 1991 | Associated Press
Calling the government "bankrupt in dealing with ethical issues," two medical societies announced plans Monday to establish a private board to review research that uses the tissues of aborted fetuses. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American Fertility Society said a board of 15 citizens would set guidelines for research in transplanting of fetal tissue and for studies involving test-tube embryos.
NEWS
October 17, 1989 | From Times staff and wire reports
Health and Human Services Secretary Louis W. Sullivan is expected to act soon on a recommendation by Dr. James O. Mason, assistant secretary for health, to extend an 19-month-old ban on fetal tissue research, government sources said. Anti-abortion groups argue that to permit transplants of tissue from aborted fetuses would create a demand for the tissue, encouraging women to have abortions.
NEWS
June 25, 1992 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House failed Wednesday to override President Bush's veto of legislation that would have ended a ban on fetal tissue research but supporters immediately introduced another bill aimed at allowing the work to proceed unimpeded. In an override vote of 271 to 156, supporters fell more than a dozen votes short of the two-thirds majority needed to enact the measure over the President's objection. So far, Congress has failed to override any of the President's vetoes.
NEWS
April 16, 1991 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Texas couple who described themselves as anti-abortion told congressmen Monday, in often emotional testimony, why they decided to undergo a fetus-to-fetus tissue transplant in attempting to save their unborn child. "We do not agree with abortion," said the Rev. Guy Walden, a Baptist minister from Houston, his voice breaking at times. But "we believed that . . . this would be consistent with a pro-life, anti-abortion position." Theirs was the first public report of such surgery.
NEWS
June 5, 1992 | From Associated Press
The Senate voted 85 to 12 Thursday to lift a government ban on the use of aborted fetuses in disease research, setting the stage for an expected veto by President Bush. The same measure passed the House last week on a 260-148 vote, which, unlike the Senate tally, is short of the two-thirds necessary to override the veto. Its supporters said fetal tissue holds the promise of new treatments for Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, diabetes and spinal cord injuries.
NEWS
January 26, 1993 | MARLENE CIMONS and THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Dr. Edward Oldfield remembers the fall weekend in 1987 when he and Dr. Robert Plunkett, a fellow neurosurgeon at the National Institutes of Health, were preparing to take a historic step--performing the world's first fetal-cell transplant on a patient suffering from Parkinson's disease. Instead, less than 48 hours before the scheduled brain surgery on a middle-aged patient, the operation was canceled as a five-year moratorium began on federal aid for fetal-tissue research.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1998
Clint Hallam, the Australian man who received a pioneering hand and forearm transplant seven weeks ago, is able to move his fingers and rotate his wrist, surgeons said this week. Hallam is able to bend each finger about 25 degrees and then straighten it out, according to Dr. Earl Owen, who headed the surgical team that performed the operation in France. However, the patient has regained no sensation.
NEWS
November 1, 1989 | MICHAEL SPECTER, THE WASHINGTON POST
Health and Human Services Secretary Louis W. Sullivan has declined to rule on whether to extend the government's controversial ban on fetal-tissue research, an unexpected action that places responsibility for the decision with a lower official known to favor continuing the ban, health officials said Tuesday.
NEWS
January 26, 1999 | From Associated Press
A man whose left hand was blown off while playing with a powerful firecracker 13 years ago received the first hand transplant in the United States. Hours later, the new hand was pink and warm. The 14 1/2-hour surgery, completed Monday, was the second such transplant ever. But doctors cautioned that the patient, Matthew David Scott, 37, had a high risk of blood clots and other complications in the first 24 hours.
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